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American Indian Studies
5

AIS104B: Beginning Navajo

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical information is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS160A1: Many Nations/Native Am

An interdisciplinary survey of native peoples in North and Central America, from their origins to present. This course is structured around the themes of sovereignty, cultural diversity, native epistemologies, the Columbian exchange, and cultural transformation and survival. These themes integrate our examination of seven native Nations, ranging from the Aztec of Central Mexico to the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. The course focuses on homelands and origins, intercultural exchange, demography, ecological transformation, the impacts of introduced epidemic diseases, processes of colonialism, social organization and culture, education, and contemporary issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
6

AIS197B: 1st Yr Scholars Success

The First-Year Scholars Program (FYSP) is a freshmen retention program offered through the Native American Student Affairs (NASA) office at The University of Arizona. It is designed to increase the retention rates of freshmen Native American students at the university by providing academic, social, and cultural activities that allow students to learn tools and resources that can contribute to their overall academic excellence and success in college. The purpose of the course is to help the First-Year Scholar Program participants build a foundation for success in their academic work by providing a structured location that meets on a weekly basis so that students can learn academic success strategies through workshops, presentations, and self-reflection.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
7

AIS200: Intro Amer Indian Stds

This course introduces student to various approaches and theories involved in American Indian studies. Intended for those minoring in American Indian studies, courses serve as basis for further upper division course work. Provides overview of tribes in U.S. their languages, histories, cultures. Large component focuses on colonialism and U.S. policy toward Native Americans and its affect within Native communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS204B: Intermediate Navajo

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
8

AIS210: Amer Indian Languages

This course surveys American Indian languages and the communities that speak them, focusing on a representative sample for closer study. The role of language in maintaining cultural identity is examined, and prospects for the future of American Indian languages are assessed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS212: Intro to American Indian Reli

An introduction to American Indian religious systems and their larger functions in communities and in history. Of particular importance are the history and effects of colonialism and missionization on native peoples, their continuing struggles for religious freedom and cultural and linguistic survival, and the ways in which American Indians use religion, both past and present, to respond to social, cultural, political, and geographical changes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
9

AIS220: Contemp Am Indian Issues

This course introduces student to various approaches and theories involved in American Indian studies. Intended for those minoring in American Indian studies, course serves as basis for further upper division course work. Provides overview of current issues affecting tribes in U.S. Large component focuses on contemporary U.S. policy toward Native Americans and its affect within Native communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS307B: Elem O'Odham Language

Speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'odham (Papago) language.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
10

AIS344: Native Americans In Film

Survey of images of American Indians in cinema, particularly commercial films. Examines differences between the "western" and the "Indian" film and how imagery affects attitudes and policy-making.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS346: Clovis To Coronado

Investigates native inhabitants of the US Southwest from its initial colonization over 11,000 years ago to the arrival of Europeans in AD 1540. Surveys past societies of the Southwest, including where they lived, their lifeways, and their material culture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
11

AIS347: Native Peoples of The SW

Explores societies and cultures of Native peoples of the US Southwest and Northern Mexico from European contact to present. Examines impact of Spain, Mexico, and the United States on these Native peoples. Discusses major contemporary issues facing Native peoples in the area.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS381: African/Indigenous Reli

This course examines religious beliefs in Africa in order to illuminate connections between religion and culture on that continent, and to examine the relationship between religio-culture and the socio-economic and political forces that shape contemporary African societies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
12

AIS415: Am Indians+Urban Exprnce

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS418: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
13

AIS421: Ethnology North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS426A: Indigenous Economics

Indigenous and aboriginal peoples in the Americas developed distinctive economic systems prior to contact with Europe. As the world economic system developed, indigenous peoples attempted to preserve their ways of life as best they could, with some success. This course examines the ontological, epistemological and moral bases of indigenous economic theory with application to contemporary problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
14

AIS434: Tribal Government

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the development of modern tribal governments, their powers, and the problems they face. Course requires a historical examination of North American indigenous societies from Pre-colonial times to the present. Indigenous groups prior to 1492 will be examined. Emphasis on traditional social and political institutions and practices. Historical development of Indian-Anglo relations, European contact to present, U.S. Indian policy, tribal sovereign powers, political economic and cultural implications toward tribal societies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
15

AIS435: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
16

AIS441A: Nat Rsrc Mgmt Native Com

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS450: American Indian Women

Interdisciplinary exploration of new information available on American Indian women, especially materials written by Indian women and investigation of the status, experience, and contributions of American Indian women from pre-contact to contemporary times.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
17

AIS467: Race + Ethnic Relations

Social processes involved in minority groups in terms of race, caste, class, ethnicity, politics, and religion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS477: Studies Native Amer Lit


Terms offered: Spring 2017
18

AIS480: Native American Warfare

This course will examine the social, cultural, and economic considerations of Native American warfare, including discourse on the nature of human aggression, methods and motives for war. Biological evidence will be discussed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
19

AIS495A: American Indian Studies

The exchange of scholarly information on important disciplinary topics, usually in a small group seminar setting with occasional lectures. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of results through discussion, reports, reviews, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
20

AIS515: Am Indians+Urban Exprnce

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications. Graduate-level requirements include to present a 15-20 page research paper as opposed to a 5-8 page term paper. Graduate students will also be graded on a total of 500 points as opposed to 250 points.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS518: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth familiarity with a subfield of choice through preparation of a substantial research paper (15-25 pages) and submission of weekly critical memos on required readings.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
21

AIS521: Ethnology North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures. Graduate-level requirements include an oral presentation and a research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS526A: Principles of Indigenous Econ

Indigenous and aboriginal peoples in the Americas developed distinctive economic systems prior to contact with Europe. As the world economic system developed, indigenous peoples attempted to preserve their ways of life as best they could, with some success. This course examines the ontological, epistemological and moral principles of indigenous economic theory with application to contemporary problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
22

AIS535: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness. Graduate-level requirements include projects with deeper analysis, additional three sessions to discuss their research projects, and research paper weighted twice as heavy as the undergraduate paper, with greater expectations in research, writing and analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
23

AIS541A: Nat Rsrc Mgmt Native Com

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change. Graduate-level requirements include Increased length of writing assignments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
24

AIS548: Rsrch Design+Methodology

This integrative course is designed to help students become professional and ethical researchers who produce the highest quality scholarship. The identification of significant research problems and the choice of appropriate and rigorous methodologies and techniques will be discussed. Students will gain experience in formulating a research problem that is theoretically important to American Indian Studies, well focused, and can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Special attention will be given to formulating a realistic Master's thesis project.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
25

AIS550: American Indian Women

This course examines and appraises the historical and contemporary place of American Indian women in Native communities and mainstream society. This is accomplished through written documents, storytelling, and other mediums with a focus on Native women's roles, status, influence, and contributions as Nation builders before contact, during colonization and decolonization. Central to the course are current issues of importance to American Indian women living on and near reservations, in urban and rural areas. Students enrolled for graduate credit are responsible for: - Research Paper: Research and analyze an issue of importance to American Indian women historically or contemporary. The paper should be 20-25 pages not including references. The paper needs to be doubled spaced, 12 font, and 1 inch margins. References documentation should be in APA, Chicago or MLA. Topics must be approved by instructors. - A formal class presentation of your research paper (20 minutes) - Book Review: A 5-8 page critique of the book, No Turning Back. Doubled spaced, 12 fonts, 1 inch margins, documentation style of APA, Chicago or MLA. Specific guidelines will be distributed in class. - A level of participation and engagement in the course on par with general expectations of graduate students
Terms offered: Spring 2017
26

AIS580: Native American Warfare

This course will examine the social, cultural, and economic considerations of Native American warfare, including discourse on the nature of human aggression, methods and motives for war. Biological evidence will be discussed. Graduate-level requirements include a bibliographical essay within the first five weeks, an extension of the bibliographical essay, and a research paper on the topic using primary research material.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
27

AIS595A: American Indian Studies

The exchange of scholarly information on important disciplinary topics, usually in a small group seminar setting with occasional lectures. The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of results through discussion, reports, reviews, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS597A: Desc Ling Native Am Lang

Workshop includes methods and techniques on how to describe a language in the four basis sub-areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics; terminology and general processes associated with the four sub-areas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
28

AIS599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS631B: Tribal Courts+Tribal Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017
29

AIS679: Amer Indian Higher Educ

Development of higher education for American Indians/Alaskan natives from the earliest efforts to contemporary times. Issues and their implications for the education of American Indians in institutions and agencies of higher education. Emphasis on tribally controlled colleges and universities, and the development of American Indian studies programs in higher education institutions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS694: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
30

AIS696F: Literature+Creative Writ

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
31

AIS900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS909: Master's Report

Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
32

AIS910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

AIS920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
33
Anthropology
34

ANTH150A1: Race, Ethnicity+Am Dream

Mind, Self and Language - Do Americans talk about race all the time or not enough? How is the idea of race woven into the fabric of our nation? How does it shape our daily life and our sense of self? How does it structure inequality in our society? This class explores race and ethnicity in the U.S. today. Approved as: General Education Gender, Race, Class, Ethnicity, or Non-Western Area Studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH150B1: Many Ways of Being Human

This course introduces the student to anthropological perspectives on cultural diversity. The course focuses on gender, race, ethnicity and class through readings by and about peoples of the non-western world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
35

ANTH160A1: Patterns in Prehistory

This course takes an explicitly global perspective exploring some important events in the history of humankind. Patterns in Prehistory examines global migration, sedentism, origins of agriculture, and the development of complex social systems through different times, places and cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
36

ANTH160A2: Ancient Egyptian Civilization

Ancient Egyptian Civilization explores the ascendance, apex and decline of one of the world's most famous but perpetually misunderstood civilizations. Discussion of ancient Egypt, from its Mesolithic foundations in the savannahs of North Africa ca. 12,000 BCE through its Pharaonic Period and conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BCE, is arranged in chronological and thematic units, each being placed in context of social, political, religious, and natural environments. For example, the course examines ancient creation myths, the diversity and origins of the gods, concept of the afterlife, religious symbolism of the built environment (temples, pyramids, tombs, etc.), and interconnections between other African, Mediterranean and Near Eastern cultures. During the semester students will learn about core concepts that have long impacted Western cultures and will explore a world vastly different from their own.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
37

ANTH160D2: Origins of Hum Diversity

Topics in Culture and Civilization - This course explores the biological and cultural evolution of the human species over the last several million years and examines human similarities and diversity globally. Approaches utilized include archaeology, biological anthropology, ecology, genetics, and geology.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH170C1: Human Var in Mod World

Fundamental concepts and principles of human biology emphasizing the evolutionary processes that create organic diversity. An in-depth study of biological differences existing within and between populations of our species focusing on genetic mechanisms and adaptive strategies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
38

ANTH199: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH199H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
39

ANTH200: Cultural Anthropology

Contemporary theories and methods in use among cultural anthropologists.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH202: Applying Anth Globl Cntx

Course introduces students to the orders of meaning and power that influence human living and working conditions, as well as the capacity of human beings to alter those conditions. A combination of lectures, readings, films, class discussions and exercises will familiarize students with approaches to global problems in applied anthropology and the solutions that the discipline has proposed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
40

ANTH220: Contemp Am Indian Issues

This course introduces student to various approaches and theories involved in American Indian studies. Intended for those minoring in American Indian studies, course serves as basis for further upper division course work. Provides overview of current issues affecting tribes in U.S. Large component focuses on contemporary U.S. policy toward Native Americans and its affect within Native communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH222: Afr Am Std:Hist of Ideas

This course is concerned with the history of oppression of African and other Indigenous peoples in the world and examines ideas by radical philosophers and scholars from the African Diaspora directed toward liberation from oppression.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
41

ANTH235: Principles Archaeology

History of archaeological research, survey of concepts and methods for the study of prehistoric cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH261: Hum Spec:Here/Envir/Beh

An introduction to human biology which focuses on the interaction of heredity and environment in producing the human phenotype.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
42

ANTH265: Human Evolution

Neontological and paleontological approaches to human evolution and variation, nonhuman primate studies, bio-molecular and anatomical variation, bio-cultural responses to environmental stress.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH276: The Nature Of Language

An introduction to the basic concepts of linguistic anthropology and their implications for the study of culture and society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
43

ANTH299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH299H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
44

ANTH305: Cultural Change

A review of theories of cultural and social change with case studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH307: Ecological Anthropology

Cultural adaptation with emphasis on the systematic interaction of environment, technology, and social organization among hunter-gatherers, nomadic herders, and peasant farmers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
45

ANTH312: The Origins of Anthropology

Anthropology as an academic discipline emerged at the beginning of the 20th century. This course traces the humanistic, philosophical, scientific, and historical roots of anthropology over more than two millennia, highlighting core concepts that defined and shaped the discipline.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH315: World Ethnography

The comparative study of selected societies of the world through extensive use of the media.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
46

ANTH317: Latin American Immigration

Migration is currently re-shaping American cities, families, urban landscapes, rural areas, and politics, and altering the nation's racial and cultural make up. In response, societal attitudes shift and are re-imagined. This course examines the quasi-permanent presence of undocumented immigrants in the United States in an age of global movements, how this confounds established spatial orders that have conventionally defined nationhood, and the ensuing struggles for belonging and place within 'a nation of immigrants.'
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH319: Mexican American Culture

Historical background, cultural institutions, identity problems, social relations, and expectations of people of Mexican ancestry in the United States.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
47

ANTH324: Human Mach:Anat/Biom/Evo

This course examines the biomechanics of everyday activities from walking and running to breathing and speaking. The course will cover basic human evolutionary anatomy as well, to determine how and when uniquely human activities evolved.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH329: Culture+Societies Africa

Introduction to African prehistory, social anthropology, ecology, religions, ancient and modern state formation, slavery, urbanization, and contemporary issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
48

ANTH330: Languages & Societies:Mid East

A course designed to explore the social and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of Middle Eastern countries.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH331: Anthropology+Development

The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
49

ANTH332: Environmntl Archaeology

Methods of paleoenvironmental analyses available to archaeologists for reconstructing past environments; topics include relative and numerical dating, geoarchaeology, paleobotany, paleontology, and zooarchaeology
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH333: Intro Archaeol Analysis

Introduction to analysis of major classes of archaeological materials, including chipped and ground stone, ceramics, fauna, flora, and architecture. Uses lectures and hands-on exercises.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
50

ANTH334A: Mesoamerican Civil:Maya

The course provides an overview of Maya archaeology from the origins of agriculture through the Spanish Conquest.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH340B: Intro Roman Art+Arch

An archaeological history of Italy (from Prehistory to Late Roman times) through the study of major excavations and monuments, with emphasis on cultural developments and relationships.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
51

ANTH342: The Archaeology of Food

What did people eat and drink in the past, and why? This course introduces students to the archaeological study of food. Topics include techniques for reconstructing past diets from material remains, and the social, economic and political roles of food.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH344: African American Rel

Critical, thematic exegesis of indigenous African and Christian contributions to African American religions. Analyzes role of religion in resisting oppression and racial injustice.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
52

ANTH346: Clovis To Coronado

Investigates native inhabitants of the US Southwest from its initial colonization over 11,000 years ago to the arrival of Europeans in AD 1540. Surveys past societies of the Southwest, including where they lived, their lifeways, and their material culture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH347: Native Peoples of The SW

Explores societies and cultures of Native peoples of the US Southwest and Northern Mexico from European contact to present. Examines impact of Spain, Mexico, and the United States on these Native peoples. Discusses major contemporary issues facing Native peoples in the area.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
53

ANTH369: Darwinian Medicine

Understand how natural selection, adaptation, and phylogeny provide insights into human health and disease and therefore, the treatment of disease
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH375: Ethnography Middle East

Introduction to and critical examination of the ethnographic literature on the peoples/cultures of the Middle East. Focus on social organization, cultural meanings, and regional political economy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
54

ANTH383: Varieties Of English

Investigation of the sociolinguistic distinctiveness of varieties of English, focusing primarily on the U.S. The history of English and phonetics will serve as a backdrop to discuss issues such as social stratification, linguistic inequality, stereotyping, and educational implications.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH384: Lat Am Globalization+Dev

Analysis of how different waves of globalization from 1500 to the present have affected the economic and political development of Latin America. Applies theories of economic development and political sociology to understand the historical and contemporary transformations in social structures and institutions including the economy, government, and social stratification.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
55

ANTH389: Mid East Ethnic+Rel Minr

Overview of ethnic and religious minorities in the contemporary Middle East, study of ethnic and religious diversity and its origin and manifestations in the modern Middle East. Examination of how the concept of religious and ethnic minority has emerged as a key factor in state policies towards minorities as well as the cultural, economic, political, religious, and educational lives of its people.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH392: Directed Research

Individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
56

ANTH393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH395B: Spec Top Cultural Anth

The course as taught in any one semester depends on student need and interest, and the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
57

ANTH395D: Spcl Tops Biologic Anth

The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. Topics may include current developments in the human genome project, genetics, evolutionary theory, primate ecology, human variation, adaptation and biocultural anthropology.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
58

ANTH399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH415: Am Indians+Urban Exprnce

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
59

ANTH418: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH421: Ethnology North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
60

ANTH425A: Anth Of Japan:Imag+Real

This course explores Japanese society employing anthropological methods. Topics include politics, social structure, gender, sociolinguistics, education, religion, and popular culture. The main theme of this course is to learn how to distinguish between images and realities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH430: Ancient Greek Technology

Technology and its applications of the ancient Greek civilization from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times
Terms offered: Spring 2017
61

ANTH431: Primate Sexuality

This course will review primate socio-sexual behaviour within an evolutionary framework. A broad survey of mating patterns within the primate order will be followed by a discussion of specific topics, including male and female mating strategies, mate choice, sperm competition, and socioendocrinology (the study of behavior-hormone relationships).
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH441A: Nat Rsrc Mgmt Native Com

This course is a survey of basic issues and concepts in natural resource management and the environment in Native communities using integrated case studies that survey all the major varieties of environmental issues in Indian Country in the 21st century. A central theme will be developing tribally-specific solutions to rebuilding the resiliency of degraded ecosystems. We will consider particular case studies such as: tribal sovereignty, land tenure, reserved rights and Native claims; Native knowledge systems and Western science; co-management and restoration; water; fish and wildlife; agriculture and rangeland management; energy, mining and nuclear waste; and global climate change.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
62

ANTH448: Writing Culture

The development of anthropological writing as it has moved toward cultural critique: the use of knowledge of other cultures to examine the assumptions of our own. Comparison of ethnographic examples.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH456B: Old World Prehistory

A survey and interpretation of archaeological evidence for human cultural development of the Old World prior to the appearance of anatomically modern humans. Course covers hunting and gathering to the roots of urban society following the Ice Age.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
63

ANTH458: Historical Archaeology

Survey of the basic data and methods of research in the material culture of modern history. The New World from first European contacts to the 20th century.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH464: Arch:Greek Religion & Ritual

This class explores the archaeological evidence for ritual and religion in the Greek world from the Neolithic through the Classical periods. We discuss how to identify various sacred sites and artifacts, and how to interpret evidence we believe may be from a religious context.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
64

ANTH467: Race + Ethnic Relations

Social processes involved in minority groups in terms of race, caste, class, ethnicity, politics, and religion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH472: Zooarchaeo+Taphonomy:Lab

Identification and classification of faunal remains from prehistoric and historic sites; investigation of the circumstances of faunal assemblage formation; introduction to quantitative and qualitative analysis of faunal data. Course work emphasizes hands-on experience in laboratory methods, analysis exercises and short research paper assignments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
65

ANTH477: Greek Architecture

A survey of the architecture and architects of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period including such sites as Mycenae, Pylos, Delphi, Athens and Corinth.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH490: Women Mid East Societ

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
66

ANTH492: Directed Research

Individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
67

ANTH495A: Sp Top Archaeology

The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH496F: Ceramic Analysis

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
68

ANTH496M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH498A: Senior Thesis

This course is normally taken as a two-semester sequence. In the first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member. During the second semester, the student writes a thesis that presents the result of their research.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
69

ANTH498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
70

ANTH499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH512A: Geoarchaeology

Applications of earth sciences in addressing archaeological questions, emphasizing past landscapes and environments, and site formation. The focus is on stratigraphy, sedimentology, soils, and geomorphology.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
71

ANTH515: Am Indians+Urban Exprnce

This class explores a series of topics and themes focused on Native Peoples and urban settings, including migration, urbanization and the creation of cities and urban communities. The class will emphasis: literature; U.S. policy; and theoretical and practical implications. Graduate-level requirements include to present a 15-20 page research paper as opposed to a 5-8 page term paper. Graduate students will also be graded on a total of 500 points as opposed to 250 points.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH518: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth familiarity with a subfield of choice through preparation of a substantial research paper (15-25 pages) and submission of weekly critical memos on required readings.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
72

ANTH521: Ethnology North America

Origin and distribution of native populations of North America; historical development and interrelations of cultures. Graduate-level requirements include an oral presentation and a research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH525A: Anth Of Japan:Imag+Real

This course explores Japanese society employing anthropological methods. Topics include politics, social structure, gender, sociolinguistics, education, religion, and popular culture. The main theme of this course is to learn how to distinguish between images and realities. Graduate-level requirements include fulfilling the assignments in the syllabus and writing longer papers. Graduate students meet with the instructor six times for additional instruction and may be asked to conduct a lecture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
73

ANTH526A: Principles of Indigenous Econ

Indigenous and aboriginal peoples in the Americas developed distinctive economic systems prior to contact with Europe. As the world economic system developed, indigenous peoples attempted to preserve their ways of life as best they could, with some success. This course examines the ontological, epistemological and moral principles of indigenous economic theory with application to contemporary problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH530: Ancient Greek Technology

Technology and its applications of the ancient Greek civilization from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times. Graduate-level requirements include a 20 page final paper, while undergraduate-level will have a 10 page final paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
74

ANTH531: Primate Sexuality

This course will review primate socio-sexual behaviour within an evolutionary framework. A broad survey of mating patterns within the primate order will be followed by a discussion of specific topics, including male and female mating strategies, mate choice, sperm competition, and socioendocrinology (the study of behavior-hormone relationships). Graduate-level requirements include additional readings, project proposal, in-class presentation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH547: Pueblo Archaeology

Detailed review of the archaeology of the Colorado Plateau emphasizing its agriculturally-based occupants, the Anasazi, and their descendants, the Pueblo Indians. Graduate-level requirements include a longer term paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
75

ANTH548: Writing Culture

The development of anthropological writing as it has moved toward cultural critique: the use of knowledge of other cultures to examine the assumptions of our own. Comparison of ethnographic examples. Graduate-level requirements include a major term paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH556B: Old World Prehistory

A survey and interpretation of archaeological evidence for human cultural development of the Old World prior to the appearance of anatomically modern humans. Course covers hunting and gathering to the roots of urban society following the Ice Age. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
76

ANTH558: Historical Archaeology

Survey of the basic data and methods of research in the material culture of modern history. The New World from first European contacts to the 20th century. Graduate-level requirements include an additional research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH561: Paleoindian Origins

Chronological development of Paleo-Indian occupation of the New World in relation to environmental changes of the Quaternary Period; site discoveries, case studies, hypothesis on the peopling of the Americas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
77

ANTH562A: Archaeological Quan Meth

Intensive review of the theory and application of statistical and mathematical methods to archaeological data.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH564: Arch:Greek Religion & Ritual

This class explores the archaeological evidence for ritual and religion in the Greek world from the Neolithic through the Classical periods. We discuss how to identify various sacred sites and artifacts, and how to interpret evidence we believe may be from a religious context. Graduate-level requirements include presenting summaries of assigned readings; leading discussions on certain topics; writing a more in-depth paper with an additional 1000 words in length compared to the undergraduate papers, and with more bibliographic references required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
78

ANTH572: Zooarchaeo+Taphonomy:Lab

Identification and classification of faunal remains from prehistoric and historic sites; investigation of the circumstances of faunal assemblage formation; introduction to quantitative and qualitative analysis of faunal data. Course work emphasizes hands-on experience in laboratory methods, analysis exercises and short research paper assignments. Graduate-level requirements include an additional long research paper and/or annotated bibliography.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH573: Semiotics And Language

Introduction to semiotics, survey of major figures and trends. Saussure and structuralism, Jakobson and functionalism/poetics, Pierce and pragmaticism. Focus on what these trends tell us about language. Students' written work will represent students' specific interests.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
79

ANTH577: Greek Architecture

A survey of the architecture and architects of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period including such sites as Mycenae, Pylos, Delphi, Athens and Corinth. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and an in-depth paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH583: Sociolinguistics

Contributions of the ethnography of communication, language variation studies, and conversation/discourse analysis to the interdisciplinary development of sociolinguistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
80

ANTH586: Transnational Feminisms

The intellectual and political field of "Transnational Feminisms," although almost instantly institutionalized from the moment of its articulation, is still very much a field-in-formation. There are a lot of ways to articulate its roots and relationships. This course will draw from feminist anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, history (particularly subaltern studies and the history of U.S. imperialism), and postcolonial studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH588: Ling Elicitatn+Document

This course introduces students to the basic techniques for documentation, analysis and description of a language in the field. Topics will include (but are not limited to): ethical issues in language documentation, basic recording and transcription techniques, phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic elicitation, narrative and (if possible) discourse documentation. Students will work with a native speaker consultant of an unfamiliar language, both in a group setting and one-on-one.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
81

ANTH590: Women Mid East Society

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities. Graduate-level requirements include an additional paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH595A: Sp Top Archaeology

The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member. Graduate-level requirements include extra sessions with instructor, additional readings, and a major research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
82

ANTH596B: Spcl Tops Caribbean Stds

The Caribbean along with other Spanish and Portuguese territories have been heavily influenced by the English, Dutch and French. This course looks at the settlement of the Caribbean with reference to those processes which frame contemporary society and public issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH596D: Paleontol Sediment Geol

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
83

ANTH596M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles. Graduate-level requirements include teaching demonstration involving one hour of teaching with a prepared lesson plan and a follow-up review and critique of your performance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH597C: Dendochronology

Hands-on, quantitative construction and assessment of dendrochronologies using software of the Dendrochronological Program Library and other computer resources.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
84

ANTH599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH603J: Sustainabilty+Env Policy

Over the past twenty years "sustainability" (or "sustainable development") has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making. Contemporary tools of environmental policy including ecosystem management, adaptive management, and restoration have been displaced by what seems like a clearer goal that captures ends as well as means. Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations. The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
85

ANTH631: Anthropology+Development

The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH637: Archaeol Methodology

Surveys the fundamental principles, methods, and techniques of archaeological analysis and inference from a multidisciplinary perspective.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
86

ANTH681: Keywords Linguistic Ant

This course probes the critical connections between language and culture through the keywords of culture, community, identify, heteroglossia, power, and ideology and includes the work of influential social theorists such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH694: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
87

ANTH696B: Cultural Anthropology

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH696D: Biological Anthropology

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
88

ANTH699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
89

ANTH909: Master's Report

Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ANTH910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
90

ANTH920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
91
Arabic
92

ARB101: Elementary Arabic I

Conversation and readings in modern standard Arabic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB102: Elementary Arabic II

Conversation and readings in modern standard Arabic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
93

ARB199: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
94

ARB399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB401: Intermediate Arabic I

Intermediate conversation and readings in modern standard Arabic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
95

ARB402: Intermediate Arabic II

Intermediate conversation and readings in modern standard Arabic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB406: Advanced Arabic II

The course promotes multiple literacies in an integrated approach to Arabic language and culture studies and builds students' ability to function at the advanced level in a variety of topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
96

ARB408: 4th Year Arabic II

The course is designed to promote the development of superior level proficiency in all four-language skills by increasing students' vocabulary, strengthening the reading abilities, refining and expanding students' knowledge of sentence structure and the mechanism of the Arabic verb system.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB424B: Levantine Arabic

Extensive oral drill with emphasis on the acquisition of facility in normal conversation and comprehension.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
97

ARB496B: Spcl Tpcs Arabic Studies

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall vary depending on the content of the course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB496M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
98

ARB498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
99

ARB499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB506: Advanced Arabic II

The course promotes multiple literacies in an integrated approach to Arabic language and culture studies and builds students' ability to function at the advanced level in a variety of topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
100

ARB508: 4th-Year Arabic II

The course is designed to promote the development of superior level proficiency in all four-language skills by increasing students¿ vocabulary, strengthening the reading abilities, refining and expanding students¿ knowledge of sentence structure and the mechanism of the Arabic verb system. Graduate-level requirements include three additional essays (1-2 typed pages each).
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB596B: Spcl Tpcs Arabic Studies

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall vary depending on the content of the course. Graduate-level requirements include two additional lengthier essay assignments, including two class presentations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
101

ARB596M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles. Graduate-level requirements include teaching demonstration involving one hour of teaching with a prepared lesson plan and a follow-up review and critique of your performance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ARB599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
102

ARB699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
103
Care, Health, and Society
104

CHS202: Connecting Society & Health

To better prepare students for the MCAT, health-related majors (e.g., Care, Health & Society), and health-related professions, this course introduces students to the sociological study of society and health. During the semester, students will explore fundamental sociological theories, perspectives, and concepts. Specific topics include doing sociological research, culture, socialization, social interaction and social structure, groups and organizations, deviance, social class and social stratification, race and ethnicity, sex and gender. Students will also connect sociological theories, perspectives, and concepts to health-related outcomes like mental health, physical health, lifestyle, genetics, and mortality risk.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS204: Intro to Helping Professions

What makes people want to help others? What are the different ways that workers are socialized to care for clients? How do bureaucracies and technologies structure the delivery of care? How do helping professionals understand the meaning of their work and the conditions of those they serve? What are the different career options for individuals interested in caring for others? This survey course provides students an opportunity to explore these and other issues and to learn from representatives of the various helping professions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
105

CHS303: Health and Society

Organization of health care in the U.S.; its impact on patients and society; health care practitioners; medical industries; policy debates.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS305: Suffer+Care In Society

How societies interpret the reality of human suffering; the organization and politics of care; the status and experiences of individuals whose work involves caring for others.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
106

CHS306: Interprofessional Care

This course prepares students who are pursuing a career in the helping professions to work as members of interdisciplinary teams.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS309: Ethical Issues-Helping Profess

This course examines ethical dilemmas common to paid care professionals.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
107

CHS350: Environment, Health, & Society

This course examines the relationships between human health and the environment from a sociological viewpoint. Using an interdisciplinary sociological perspective, we will explore the increasing number of illnesses linked to environmental contamination and disasters. Since this is a course in the social sciences, only a basic understanding of the biological and chemical nature of environmental pollution will be needed. Our focus will be on the socioeconomic production of environmental health risks and how science and public policy are contested by various stakeholders.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
108

CHS394: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS401: Health Disparities in Society

This course introduces students to the sociological study of health disparities. The purpose of the course is to examine the link between social position and health patterns in the US population. Specific topics include, for example, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, aging, family, and religious involvement.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
109

CHS460: Self-Care - Helping Profession

The emotional, physical and spiritual demands of the caring and health professions are significant. Students are introduced to the importance of wellness and self-care practices as they consider careers in the helping professions. This course will explore the impact of cultivating compassion vs. empathy in working with clients/patients, as well as offer students an opportunity to cultivate a wellness/self-care practice in their own lives. The course culminates in a research paper on the student's selected wellness/self-care practice.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

CHS496: Special Topics

This course is designed to provide a flexible topics seminar for undergraduates across several domains within Care, Health and Society. Students will develop and exchange scholarly and/or applied information in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers. Potential topic areas include: delivery of care; health disparities; health care inequality; gender; globalization; law and society; organizations; poverty; race and ethnicity; social networks; social psychology; and stratification.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
110

CHS498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
111
Communication
112

COMM101: Intro to Study of Comm

This course offers a general introduction to the systematic study of human communication. It is intended to provide a overview of communication study, including definitions of key terms, explanations of foundational concepts and assumptions, a brief history of the discipline, methods of research, and areas of specialized scholarship.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
113

COMM113: Intro Small Group Comm

This course explores how communication functions in small groups. Readings, assignments, and activities are designed to help observe and understand the communication processes and outcomes that occur in small groups. Aspects covered include: verbal and nonverbal communication in groups, the structure and environment of groups, group member roles, group decision making, leadership, conflict management, group development, and meeting management. In this course you will apply communication concepts to actual situations as you participate in small groups throughout the semester. Since you will be building on the material learned in COMM 101, you must have completed, or be enrolled in, COMM 101 to take this class.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
114

COMM114: Intro Interpersonal Comm

An introductory course in interpersonal communication. It is expected that you will finish the course with knowledge of basic interpersonal communication principles, as well as practice in applying those principles in everyday interpersonal settings. To that end, the class will combine readings, lectures, in-class activities, and out-of-class assignments. Emphasis will be on understanding and achieving communication goals in interpersonal relationships, including the following areas: effective listening, emotional expression, self presentation, self disclosure, initiating relationships, maintaining relationships, gaining compliance, and managing conflict.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM119: Public Speaking

This course is designed to help students become more comfortable with speaking in public, and to familiarize them with the theory-based, basic skills of public speaking. It will also help to increase students' communication, competence, and effectiveness, as well as improve capabilities in research, and critical thinking. This course will expose students to a variety of everyday speaking occasions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
115

COMM209: Intro to Comm Technology

An overview of new communication technology and the process of adoption of new technologies in groups, organizations, and communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
116

COMM228: Intro Rsrch Methods Comm

This course will expose students to the logic and conduct of research that is aimed at producing generalizable knowledge about human communication. The goal of the course is to develop students' ability to understand and evaluate social scientific research. Toward that end, students will be exposed to the logic of scientific investigation, different research methods common to the field of communication, statistics, and several special topics in social scientific research. By the end of the semester students will be able to interpret information presented in fundamental statistics and will be able to conduct elementary statistical analyses, in addition to understanding the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations inherent in different research designs.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
117

COMM300: Intro Communication Thry

Origin and development of basic concepts in communication theory and research; survey and analysis of theories and models in research.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
118

COMM309: Intro Mass Media Effects

This course examines the role of the mass media in the evolution of society and as they impact individuals and groups. It follows an analysis of the process, content, and effects of mass media. Topics covered include news, advertising, and entertainment media content; violent, sexual, and political content and effect; media technologies; cultivation; diffusion of innovations; media events; etc. The course focuses on some major questions, including: (1) What is the role of the media in bringing about shifts and changes in people and social institutions? (2) How do individuals and groups, as media consumers, respond to the content to which they are exposed in the media? and (3) What are some explanations for how media effects on individuals and society occur?
Terms offered: Spring 2017
119

COMM310: Intro to Org Comm

This course is designed to help students become more effective and successful employees and organizational communication professionals by teaching principles and practices in the areas of effective supervisor-subordinate communication, effective coworker communication, participating in formal and informal communication networks, information sharing, intercultural communication in diverse workplaces, conflict management, ethical workplace communication, and a variety of other important communication practices.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM311: Comm Technology Theory

This course will investigate the role that information and information technology plays in our social and communicative processes. It will look at the affects of information access/aggregation and instantaneous communication on management styles, the shape, functionality and utility of modern organizations and societies, the changing role of individuals and the issues of anonymity, privacy and security.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
120

COMM313: Comm + Public Relations

Prepares students for achieving effective communication and relationships with various publics on behalf of organizations. Students will learn about the purpose and function of public relations and the theory and principles that guide its practice. The course provides a foundation for the understanding and practice of public relations from a communication perspective. Students will apply coursework to public relations projects and build a public relations portfolio.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM314: Creative Professional Comm

The discovery and development of effective creative communication for undergraduate students. The class includes an overview of creativity and communication strategies that relate to personal and professional situations. Learning modules include creative development, promotion techniques and skills as well as focus on establishing, maintaining and leading relationships through the integrated marketing communications process.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
121

COMM318: Persuasion

Theories of Social Influence with particular attention to the means of changing attitudes and behaviors.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM325: Argumentation

Study of the philosophy, theory and practice of argumentation; analysis and comparison of classical and contemporary models of advocacy and evidence; examination of argument in public policy, legal, and debate settings. Practical experience in developing and presenting arguments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
122

COMM369A: Health Communication

The discipline of health communication focuses on the unique structure and function of communication processes within such areas as physician-patient interactions, public health awareness/prevention/intervention campaigns, community health education, multimedia presentations of health information, and hospital and health-care organizations. This course is designed to: (1) facilitate student learning in the arena of health care communication and (2) provide the opportunity for students to collaborate with at least one Tucson community health group in designing the plans for a health communication campaign.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
123

COMM405: Mass Comm And Children

This course employs a developmental perspective to examining the relationship between the mass media and young audience members. Major topics covered include issues related to children and adolescents as a unique audience (e.g., media use habits, attention and comprehension of media content), media and their content (e.g., media violence, advertising, educational programming), media effects (e.g., fear reactions, construction of role and reality perceptions), and intervention issues (e.g., parental mediation of media exposure, media literacy, and relevant public policy).
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM406: Violence in Mass Media & Soc.

This course examines the theoretical and empirical connections between media violence (e.g., violence in television shows, films, video games, pornography, etc.) and societal violence. In order to fully understand these connections, this course will begin by examining the nature of aggressive behavior its development, including situational and individual factors. Next, the research regarding violent media exposure to short-term and long-term increases in aggressive behavior as well as the processes that explain these increases will be examined. Finally, societal and individual approaches to controlling and/or mitigating the effects of media violence will be explored.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
124

COMM413: Communication & Gender

This course will explore sex and gender as they relate to communication behavior. Various approaches to the study of sex/gender effects will be covered, as will the implications of adopting these orientations. Emphasis will be placed on empirical evidence of sex/gender similarities and differences in communication. Students will exercise their research skills and analytical ability via major course projects which involve self-directed close examination of selected sex/gender effects.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM417A: Rel Comm:Close Relations

The relational communication process and messages people use to define interpersonal relationships, including dominance-submissiveness, affection, involvement and similarity in close relationships.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
125

COMM420: Comm + the Legal Process

Presents a number of accomplishments and challenges in the social scientific study of law, with special emphasis on the effects of communication and social structure on the legal processes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM422: Presidential Lrdshp+Comm

Examination of presidential leadership and communication strategies of the modern presidents from Kennedy to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
126

COMM451: Comm & Emotion

This course focuses on the role of emotion in the communication process. We will examine various theoretic perspectives that explain what emotions are and what they do. We will articulate the roles of each class of emotions (joyful, hostile, social, etc.) in human communication, and adjudicate various applications of emotion research and theory in effective communication practice.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM493L: Legislative Internship

Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
127

COMM499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM571: Rsrch Methodologies II

This course will expose students to fundamental and intermediate techniques for the analysis of quantitative data. Descriptive statistics, univariate, and multivariate statistics will be covered throughout the semester. In addition to examining different analytical techniques, students will be exposed to computer programs for statistical analyses.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
128

COMM589: Scholarly Communication

Structure and workings of scholarly communication and products in the U.S. Examines the content and technology of scholarly communication in various disciplines.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
129

COMM610: Communication Theory I

An overview of theoretical perspectives on the role of verbal and nonverbal communication in the process of generating and understanding development of interpersonal relationships.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM696F: Tpc Psycholing+Lang Proc

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting with in depth investigation of topics in Psycholinguistics and Language Processing. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
130

COMM696P: Political Comm

Course is a graduate-level seminar in Political Communication. Students will read primary research in Communication relating to Politics and learn the key theoretical perspectives in the area. They will become familiar with current areas of interest in the topic area and future directions. Course will involve lecture, discussion, and the production of graduate level coursework. Specific content areas will vary by semester and instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM696R: Advanced Comm Research Methods

Course is a graduate-level seminar in Advanced Research Communication Methods. Students will read primary research in Communication relating to Research Methods and learn the key theoretical perspectives in the area. They will become familiar with current areas of interest in the topic area and future directions. Course will involve lecture, discussion, and the production of graduate level coursework. Specific content areas will vary by semester and instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
131

COMM699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
132

COMM910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

COMM920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
133
Development Practice
134

DVP630: Essential Mgmt Principles

This course introduces participants to the structure of development delivery services and the management skills that these delivery systems utilize. It first focuses on the organizational and operational characteristics of the principal development actors (bilateral and multilateral donors, international NGOs, local NGOs, national government agencies, foundations, etc.); then analyzes the sequential steps of the delivery process, including strategic planning, assessment, problem analysis / theory of change, project design, monitoring and evaluation, project administration, proposal development and policy analysis. This course will be administered by a combination of TANGO International Executive Officers and qualified guest lecturers with expertise in relevant fields.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

DVP642A: Cross Cohort Workshop

The course will co-convene first and second year MDP students. It is designed to promote a collaborative learning environment for both cohorts. First year students will be expected to prepare for an intensive summer field practicum and produce a proposal for their field projects. Second year students will analyze and present the findings of their projects conducted the previous summer and help to orient the first-year cohort in proposal development and field work. This course will provide a concrete context around which analytical concepts and methodological tools can be evaluated and refined.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
135

DVP699: Independent Study

Qualified Development Practice students will work on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
136

DVP909: The MDP Culmination Project

The Field Practicum will culminate with a Master's Project. In collaboration with field-partners and faculty advisors, students will develop a report on the field research objectives, methods, and outcomes. The Master's project will be refined in the cross-cohort seminar and presented to program faculty and first year students in class as part of the seminar requirements. Additionally, it is anticipated that the Master's Report will reflect each student's chosen second-year specialization within MDP. The project will be presented formally at the annual University of Arizona MDP Forum, involving faculty and leading representatives of the international development community and the MDP network. Student papers will contribute to the MDP Discussion Paper Series, available online as a forum for collaboration among students and faculty engaged in the MDP network and the broader international development community.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
137
Economics
138

ECON150C1: An Economic Perspective

The study of the interactions of individuals and societies from the viewpoint of economics. The Course examines a series of important social problems that lie on the intersections of economics and disciplines such as law, history, anthropology, political science, psychology, and so forth.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON200: Basic Economic Issues

National and international economic issues. An introduction to economic analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
139

ECON205: Ethics+Econ/Wealth Creat

We will study the ethics and the economics of such phenomena as market competition, institutions of private and public property, trade restrictions, globalization, and corporate welfare. How do people create wealth? How do societies enable people to create wealth? Are some ways more ethical than others? Why do some societies grow rich while neighboring societies remain poor? People have various ways of creating wealth. Which are ethical and which are not? Why? (PHIL 205 is not an introduction to the principles of Economics and is not a substitute for ECON 200, ECON 201A or ECON201B.)
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON291: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
140

ECON299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON300: Microecon Anls Bus Decis

Examination of industrial structure; theory of prices under varying market conditions; applications to business problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
141

ECON301: Microeconomic Analysis & Appl

The objective of this course is to familiarize you with core microeconomic foundations that will allow you to understand how various economic forces and phenomena emerge, how alternative economic institutions functions to allocate resources, how individuals and enterprises can best position themselves in various types of economic environments, and how government policy and external factors affect economic outcomes and welfare.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON307: Economic History of the U.S.

Economic history of the United States from the colonial era to the present and what affected the changes in the U.S. economy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
142

ECON325: Hist Dev Fin+Econ Inst

Historical development of securities markets. Topics include financial scandals, early origins of Wall Street, the Robber Barons, the Crash of 1929, up to the Enron crisis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON330: Macroecon + Glbl Inst + Policy

The study of how the macroeconomy is affected by institutions, technology and other forces, and governmental policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
143

ECON332: Inter Macroeconomics

Analysis of output, employment, interest rates, and the price level; the effects of these on changes in monetary and fiscal variables.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON338: Law and Economics

This course uses economic analysis to analyze the basic common law areas of property, contract, tort, and criminal law. Economic tools are used both to understand the basic structure of the law, and to suggest how the law might be made more efficient. The course assesses whether individuals or collective action (courts) are better for addressing market failures. Transaction costs and litigation costs (among other things) are crucial to the assessment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
144

ECON340: Int'L Econ And Policy

Normative and positive aspects of international trade and international monetary economics, with attention drawn to government policy as it relates to international commercial relations. Not available to students who are enrolled in or have completed ECON 442 or ECON 443.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON361: Inter Microeconomics

Determination of prices and quantities in product and factor markets. If you have dropped ECON 361 with a W, contact econreg@eller.arizona.edu and repeatability will be reviewed on a case by case basis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
145

ECON371: Economic Development

Analysis of the economic development process of newly developing nations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON373: Environmental Economics

Analysis of current environmental problems and their potential solutions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
146

ECON391: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
147

ECON396H: Honors Proseminar

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
148

ECON399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON400: Econ Strategy:Business Decisns

The use of microeconomic analysis to formulate sound economic strategies for businesses of various types.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
149

ECON406: Intro Experimental Econ

Lab experimental studies of economic behavior; applications to monopoly, bilateral bargaining, and competitive markets under various exchange rules; speculation, voting processes, public goods.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON407: Economics of Strategy

The microeconomics of strategy; the economics of imperfect information and uncertainty, externalities and public goods, and imperfect competition.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
150

ECON418: Intro to Econometrics

Statistical methods in estimating and testing economic models; single and simultaneous equation estimation, identification, forecasting, and problems caused by violating classical regression model assumptions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON427: Crnt Tps: Hlthcare Econ\Policy

This course uses the core principles and methods of health economics to analyze current important issues in healthcare economics & policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
151

ECON431: Games and Decisions

Introduction to decision theory and game theory and their application to various economic situations under conditions of complete and incomplete information.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON435: Public Sector Economics

The influence of governmental revenue and expenditure decisions on resource allocation, income distribution, and aggregate economic performance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
152

ECON440: Behavioral Game Theory

To introduce students to the exciting world of behavioral game theory, which brings concepts and ideas from psychology into the study of economics, to bear on situations where decision makers interact and influence each other as studied using game theory.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON452: Info Econ+the Internet

This course will use concepts and tools from microeconomics to analyze and help students understand the internet, electronic commerce, and other facets of information technology.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
153

ECON453: Data Anal & Mdl: Quant Anl-Ecn

Forecasting techniques used in business and government; assembly, interpretation and use of economic data; analysis of business conditions; examination of related environmental factors; construction of actual sales or revenue forecasts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON460: Industrial Organization

Structure, conduct, and performance of American industry; governmental institutions and policies affecting business.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
154

ECON473: Energy Markets & Environ Econ

Economic analysis of various markets for energy and the impact of energy production and consumption on the environment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON479: Communication in Economics

Develops written communication skills applied to topics in economics. Students are required to enroll in ECON 479 as soon as they are eligible. If registration is delayed until the student's last semester and they do not earn an A, this will delay graduation. In order to satisfy this course, a grade of C or better must be earned. If a C or better has not been earned, then the student must repeat the course. Once a grade of C or better has been earned, the requirement has been met and the student may not repeat the course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
155

ECON481: Econ of Wage Determination

Applications of economic theory and empirical methods to labor supply and demand, investment in human capital, minimum wages, union effects on relative wages, and labor market discrimination.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON491: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
156

ECON498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
157

ECON499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
158

ECON501C: Microeconomic Theory

Other selected topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON502: Dynamic Econ Analysis

National income analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
159

ECON504: Production Economics

Theory of the firm and industry; single and multiple products; risk and uncertainty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON508: Applied Economic Analy

Uses economic history to show how research methods in economics are used to analyze data collected through empirical observation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
160

ECON516: Microecon Of Agr Dvlpmnt

Economics of farm- and household-level decision making. Study input and output markets, technology adoption and social economics in lower-income countries.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON522A: Econometrics

The theory of econometric estimation of single and simultaneous equation models.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
161

ECON527: Crnt Tps: Hlthcare Econ\Policy

This course uses the core principles and methods of health economics to analyze current important issues in healthcare economics & policy. Graduate-level requirements include being held to a higher performance standard and will be expected to write a more extensive research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON549: Appl Econometric Anls

Econometric model-building, estimation, forecasting and simulation for problems in agricultural and resource economics. Applications with actual data and models emphasized.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
162

ECON550: Economics For Managers

Microeconomic theory and applications for business management decision making.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON551: Business Strategy

Development of business strategies to promote the competitive performance of firms.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
163

ECON555: Macroeconomics & Forecasting

An understanding of the larger economy is essential to making good business decisions. This course examines how macroeconomic performance is measured, how monetary and fiscal policies influence macroeconomic performance, and how these relate to individuals and businesses. The course also provides students with an understanding of how macroeconomists produce forecasts and how those forecasts should be used. Students will learn macroeconomic concepts and immediately apply them to real world scenarios using macroeconomic data. The focus will be on analytical skills that will allow the student to apply macroeconomics to the real world in real time.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON556: Health Economics

Healthcare expenditures now account for more than 1/6 of Gross Domestic Product in the United States. This class will explore the sources of funding for those expenditures, and the rapidly changing trends therein.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
164

ECON578: Energy/Environ/Bus Strat

Analysis of issues and ideas that cut across corporate social responsibility, sustainable business practices, energy considerations, and environmental innovation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON591: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
165

ECON593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
166

ECON696B: Behavioral Economics

The study and analysis of recent developments in behavioral economics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON696I: Labor Economics II

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
167

ECON696Q: Indus Org+Regulation II

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON696U: Game Theory

Development and application of game theoretic models and techniques.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
168

ECON696V: Environmental and Energy Econ

Using formal economic analysis to provide new perspectives on environmental questions. The first half of the course emphasizes methods for dynamic analysis and numerical techniques for dynamic optimization, with special application to climate economics. The second half studies theoretical approaches to a core set of environmental and energy topics, including decision-making under uncertainty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON696X: Economic History I

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
169

ECON697B: Appl Economic Analysis

The study and analysis of recent developments in empirical economics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON697I: Adv Microeconomic Theory

The practical application of theoretical learning within a group setting and involving an exchange of ideas and practical methods, skills, and principles.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
170

ECON699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
171

ECON909: Master's Report


Terms offered: Spring 2017

ECON910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
172

ECON920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
173
English
174

ENGL101: First-Year Composition

Exposition, emphasis on essays.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL101A: 1st-Year Comp with Discussion

Exposition, emphasis on essays with writing discussion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
175

ENGL102: First-Year Composition

Critical papers on selected subjects.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL106: Engl Comp Esl Students

Elements for expository prose for ESL students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
176

ENGL107: Engl Comp ESL Students

Exposition, emphasis on essays, for ESL students. All entering international students must take a placement examination given at the beginning of each semester and summer session. Contact the Writing Program.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL108: Engl Comp ESL Students

Critical papers on selected subjects for ESL students. All entering international students must take a placement examination given at the beginning of each semester and summer session. Contact the Writing Program.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
177

ENGL109H: Adv First-Year Compositn

Critical papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL160A1: Colonial+Postcolonl Lit

A study of non-western texts (from Africa, India, or the Caribbean) that use English as a literary language while incorporating indigenous materials.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
178

ENGL160D1: Critical Cultural Concepts

This course examines--through literature, film, art, and philosophy-different concepts critical to the shaping of primarily "Western" culture(s), with a glance at similar concepts in "non-Western" cultures. The course is also "critical" in the sense that it asks students, through virtually weekly take-home quizzes, to critique these concepts, taking the wheat and letting the chaff be still. Topics may include the ideology of war or human rights; the problem of evil; the figure of the Trickster; and others.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL201: Intro Writ Creat Nonfict

This course is intended to give students a practical understanding of beginning techniques of nonfiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original nonfiction, and readings in contemporary nonfiction. The course complements existing courses in poetry (ENGL209) and fiction (ENGL210). All three courses are intended to improve undergraduate education by providing contact hours with Creative Writing faculty members early in the undergraduate's course of study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
179

ENGL209: Intro Writing Of Poetry

Beginning techniques of poetry writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original poetry, and readings in contemporary poetry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL210: Intro Writing Of Fiction

Beginning techniques of fiction writing, taught through exercises, the writing of original fiction, and readings in contemporary fiction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
180

ENGL215: Elmnts of Craft/Creative Write

Multi-genre craft course introducing creative writing craft terms and concepts via intensive reading in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL220B: Literature Of The Bible

New Testament: The Gospels, the Epistles of Paul, and Revelation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
181

ENGL230: Intro:African Literature

Anglophone and Francophone literature. Focuses on major authors; Achebe, Soyinka, Head, Wa Thiong'O, Brutus, Emecheta. Employs bio-literary analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL245: African Lit Translation

Introduction to Francophone African literature coming from the Western part of the African continent, which forms a geographical and cultural entity. Taught in English. Does not count toward fulfillment of language requirement, or the major or minor in French.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
182

ENGL255: Intro To Engl Language

Basic concepts in the study of the English language: history, semantics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and discourse. English in its social context: regional and social varieties, language acquisition, and English as an international language.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL263: Tpcs Children Literature

Topics in children's literature, may include "Poetry for children," "Adapting literary classics for children," and others.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
183

ENGL265: Major American Writers

Intensive study of selected works by major American writers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL280: Intro To Literature

Close reading of literary texts, critical analysis, and articulation of intellectually challenging ideas in clear prose.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
184

ENGL295A: British Life + Culture

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL300: Literature and Film

Comparative study of literature and cinema as aesthetic media.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
185

ENGL301: Intermed Nonfiction Writ


Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL304: Inter Fiction Writing

Practice in writing short fiction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
186

ENGL306: Advanced Composition

Study of genre and rhetorical situation; advanced practice in expository writing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL307: Business Writing

Practice in writing business letters, reports and proposals.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
187

ENGL308: Technical Writing

Analysis and presentation of scientific and technical information.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL309: Poetry Writing

Practice in writing poetry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
188

ENGL310: Studies in Genres

The origin and evolution of genres in literature, rhetoric, and nonfiction prose, among others.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
189

ENGL322: Struct+Meaning Of Words

An in-depth introduction to the sounds, structures, meanings and history of English words. At the end of the course, you will know more about the answers to questions like this: Why are English alphabet letters pronounced they way they are? How do we use our mouths to make the sounds of English? What makes certain poems sound rhythmic and metrical? What are the rules that govern the construction of English words from suffixes and prefixes? How do children begin to identify and acquire words from the speech they hear? How did English come to be the language spoken in England? Why is English full of borrowed words? Why is English spelling so inconsistent?
Terms offered: Spring 2017
190

ENGL340: Topics In Prof+Tech Wrtg

An advanced topics course on professional and technical writing
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL342: Writers, Women+The Gods

In order to conceptualize the way gender and ethnicity has shaped women's lives in the public and private domain students will "hear" the voices of African American women in ethnography, history and literature as we discuss the Africana concepts of life, health, beauty and family. The experiences of these women, as expressed in literature have become "formidable" presences in African American culture and history. The self-expression and self-definition, expressed by African American women's voices have generated social and political changes in American history that have also impacted the dominant Euro-American culture of American society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
191

ENGL344: Native Americans In Film

Survey of images of American Indians in cinema, particularly commercial films. Examines differences between the "western" and the "Indian" film and how imagery affects attitudes and policy-making.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL355: English Sociolinguistics

Study of English form and use in relation to social and cultural contexts. Topics include regional and social dialectology, attitudes toward variation and change, strategies of interaction, gender and language use, and politeness, power and politics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
192

ENGL373A: Brit+Am Lit:Beowulf-1600

A survey of British and American literature to 1660, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL373B: Brit+Am Lit:Rest-19th C

A survey of British and American literature from 1660 to the Victorian period, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
193

ENGL379: Lit & Film: Hist\Theory\Critic

Study of literary and cinematic forms in relationship to each other, with attention to history and theory.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL380: Literary Analysis

Introduction to the various modes, techniques, and terminology of practical criticism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
194

ENGL393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL394: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
195

ENGL396A: Junior Proseminar

This junior-level proseminar introduces students to methods and materials of literary research. Content of individual seminars will vary, based upon instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL400: Themes Literature + Film

Special topics or themes in literature and film.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
196

ENGL401: Adv Crtv Non-Fict Writ

Writing-Emphasis Course for creative writing majors.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL404: Advanced Fiction Writing

This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student stories in a workshop setting.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
197

ENGL406: Modern English Grammar

Introduction to the nature of grammar and approaches to the description of English grammar, emphasizing Chomsky's transformational-generative model. Focus is on grammatical structure, but scope includes phonology and social/historical factors which influence the form and use of English in various contexts. Includes practice in phonemic transcription and sentence diagramming.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL409: Advanced Poetry Writing

This is a Writing Emphasis Course for the Creative Writing Major. Discussion of student poems in a workshop setting.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
198

ENGL423: Tpc Caribbean Clt,Lit+Id

The aim of the course is to investigate African Caribbean writings in English on issues from slavery through the 20th century. the key focus will be on issues from what is now considered the post colonial islands and countries. It will also take into account, the growing body of literature by Caribbean women writers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL431B: Shakespeare

Ten comedies, tragedies and tragicomedies from the period 1601-1613.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
199

ENGL443: Mex-Am Lit In English

Study of the literature, in English or English translation, by Mexican-American authors, or important to the development of Mexican-American literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL454B: Rev 20th Cent Ireland

Focuses on aesthetic, feminist, social, and political revolution in 20th century Irish literature; complexities of Irish nationalism examined through history, art, and literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
200

ENGL467: Tops French Linguistics

Examines in detail current topics in the linguistic analysis of French. May be repeated when topics vary. Taught in French with readings in French and English.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL470: Lit & Major Philosophical Trad

Selected works of literature in connection with particular philosophical statements or problems. An honors section is available.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
201

ENGL472: Modern Fiction

American, British, and Continental fiction, with particular attention to the development of characteristically modern techniques.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL477: Studies Native Amer Lit


Terms offered: Spring 2017
202

ENGL479: Film/Genre/Adaptation Theories

Classical taxonomies, formalist, structuralist, aesthetic and contemporary theories of literary and film genres and narrative.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL486: Topics In Am Literature

A consideration of important authors, works, and themes in American literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
203

ENGL493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL493L: Legislative Internship

Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
204

ENGL494: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL494P: Portfolios Prof./Tech. Writing

Students will explore the theories and practices of professional and academic portfolios while simultaneously designing and developing an adaptive identity and a professional persona for post-graduate settings. Students will synthesize work from past and present courses and experiences. They will make complex composition decisions about content, design, structure, and media of their portfolios in connection with identifiable elements of a given rhetorical situation. Students will discuss and apply legal and ethical issues related to portfolio development and publication of 21st century digital identities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
205

ENGL496A: Auth,Period,Genres+Theme

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
206

ENGL498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
207

ENGL501: Adv Crtv Non-Fict Writ

For M.F.A. candidates working toward book-length writing project in nonfiction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL543: Mex-Am Lit In English

Study of the literature, in English or English translation, by Mexican-American authors, or important to the development of Mexican-American literature. Graduate-level requirements include an extra paper and leading a class discussion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
208

ENGL555A: 19th Century British Lit

The Romantics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL557A: Modern British Lit

Modern British literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
209

ENGL567: Tops French Linguistics

Examines in detail current topics in the linguistic analysis of French. May be repeated when topics vary. Taught in French with readings in French and English. Graduate-level requirements include higher level of oral and written work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL573: Semiotics And Language

Introduction to semiotics, survey of major figures and trends. Saussure and structuralism, Jakobson and functionalism/poetics, Pierce and pragmaticism. Focus on what these trends tell us about language. Students' written work will represent students' specific interests.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
210

ENGL587: Assessment in 2nd/Foreign Lang

The primary objective of this course is the development of language teachers' assessment literacy, which includes knowledge of key assessment principles and skill in creating or adopting assessment tools and procedures for the language classroom. Participants in this course will develop their knowledge and skills related to assessing all skill areas in the language classroom, including productive skills (writing, speaking), receptive skills (reading, listening), and assessing grammar and vocabulary. Grading and student evaluation will also be important topics of consideration and exploration in this course. Designed specifically for in-service (and pre-service) language teachers, the course combines theory with practice by covering essential principles of effective classroom assessment and the development of effective assessment tools for classroom use. Participants completing this course will become more assessment literate and better able to evaluate student performance in their classrooms fairly and effectively.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
211

ENGL588: Euro Lit-Pol Cabaret

The development of European literary-political cabaret from its origins in France to its most recent developments in Western and Eastern Europe.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL591: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
212

ENGL593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL594: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
213

ENGL595A: Professional Studies

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL596G: Comparative Literature

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
214

ENGL596H: Modern Literature

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL596L: Theories of Criticism

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
215

ENGL596O: Top in Sec Lang Teaching

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
216

ENGL604: Writing Project Fiction

For M.F.A candidates working toward book-length writing project in fiction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL609: Writing Project Poetry

For M.F.A candidates working toward book-length writing project in poetry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
217

ENGL612: Grammatical Analysis

Advanced English grammatical analysis in relation to the acquisition of English as a second language.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL613: Meth Tch Engl:Spkr Other

Foundations, theory, and methodology in English as a second language.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
218

ENGL615: Second Lang Acqsn Thry

Survey of major perspectives on second language acquisition processes, including interlanguage theory, the Monitor Model, acculturation/pidginization theory, cognitive/connectionist theory, and linguistic universals. Analysis of research from the different perspectives includes consideration of grammatical, pragmatic, and sociolinguistic dimensions of language learning.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL693A: Applied Esl

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
219

ENGL696E: Studies in Rhetoric+Comp

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL696F: Literature+Creative Writ

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
220

ENGL696S: Hist Stds Rhetoric+Comp

Courses offered under this number may have a thematic focus that ranges across traditional periods and cultural boundaries, or a course may focus on the historical development of particular groups or movements.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ENGL909: Master's Report

Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
221

ENGL920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
222
eSociety
223

ESOC150B1: Social Media and Ourselves

This course is designed as a gateway to understanding how social media sites influence and are impacted by our selves, as well as the role of social media in our relationships. This course with its focus on social media sites in particular, will examine the various implications and functions of social media in contemporary times. The study of new media takes place across disciplinary divides and from multiple theoretical perspectives. This course will thus explore social media research from across academic traditions. With a focus on both theory and practical applications, this course gives learners opportunities to think intellectually about how mobile technologies and being online impacts daily living, personal health, individual success, and interpersonal relationships.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
224

ESOC210: Hacking & Open Source Culture

This course examines the popular image of hackers and hacking by considering the larger cultural context of information sharing in the digital age. This course introduces students to theories and practices of information sharing including the public domain, information as a common public good, hacking, copy left, open source software, open access publishing, and the creative commons.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
225

ESOC211: Collaborating: Online Commun

With the increasing reliance on new media for collaborative work, social connection, education, and health-related support, this course will analyze human collaboration and community processes online. By considering how people create a sense of community, maintain group connections, and cooperate with others to bring about a particular outcome, this class will focus on what humans do, how they present themselves, and how they do the work of collaboration in online contexts. In addition to focusing on how humans work together in online in communities, this course will examine the many theories and interdisciplinary bodies of literature that pertain to `community¿ generally, and `online communities¿ specifically. With a focus on both theory and practical applications, this course gives learners opportunities to think intellectually about technology-based collaborations and to apply course-based knowledge in their mediated social lives. This course is not a technical experience, rather it focuses on the theories pertaining to and the processes in play when humans engage in group collaborations (e.g., gaming, teaching, learning, working, or gaining health-related support) via mobile technologies and online sites.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
226

ESOC212: Social Media Strategies

This course offers a broad survey of contemporary thinking about social media and examines mediated practices across sectors such as health care, education, government, museums, tourism, and business. Students will be exposed to a range of applicable theories, will be introduced to contemporary notions of information behavior (i.e., seeking, using, and negotiating information), will consider the historical evolution of new media environments, and will become familiar with information and social media literatures. In focusing on how people share social and practical information online, this course will examine how people aim to bring about particular outcomes via social media.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ESOC213: The Past and New Media

This course explores the emergence of contemporary visual culture and technological changes over time as well as how these shifts have and continue to impact human events, societal eras, and the `telling' of human stories. Specifically, this course offers an introduction into thinking critically about past events and related interpretations, handling archival materials, and visualizing human activity over time with new media technologies. Students will consider the function of digital narratives in processing, creating, and representing understandings of historical, personal, or location-based events and experiences.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
227

ESOC300: Digital Storytelling & Culture

This course will lay a foundation for understanding how stories shape communities, identities, memories, and perspectives on our lives. In addition, this course will provide opportunities for the theoretical analysis of self representation, composite narratives on behalf of others, cultural heritage, and memories as they are preserved and performed within stories and through narrative. Influences on digital digital storytelling such as the sociocultural context, the institutional contexts of production the audience, and the needs or goals of the digital storyteller will be examined. Students will be required to call on their own intellectual, emotional, and imaginative processes, as well as to develop their own skills in digital storytelling, interviewing, oral history collection, and the use of relevant digital storytelling tools.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
228

ESOC301: Qualitative Internet Research

This course will lay a foundation for understanding how to design and conduct qualitative research in the digital age. This course will focus on such practices as digital ethnography, online discourse or text analysis, web-based survey research, virtual interviewing, and data collection via mobile technologies. Broad paradigmatic assumptions underpinning interpretive inquiry will also be examined.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ESOC302: Quantitative Methods

This course will explore broad research paradigms and theoretical approaches that inform contemporary social research, varying study designs, as well as the systematic methods utilized in differing types of data analyses. Though this course will introduce research processes across the academic spectrum, quantitative analysis of both small and large data sets will be emphasized. Therefore, students will learn about basic statistical analyses and will be introduced to the emerging worlds of data science and social media analytics. Students will also consider related topics such as data visualization or research presentations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
229

ESOC313: Digital Discourse and Identity

The focus of this course is on how social information is produced though language and identity work online, focusing on patterns of talk and interactional rules and practices across contexts (e.g., text-messaging, online communities, personal identity work, and transnational blogs). As part of this focused study of talk, this course will explore how online language use can create, maintain, reproduce, or disrupt roles and related norms (e.g., those of a friend, student, expert, or political agent), as well as identities and social categories (e.g., gender, sexuality, race, disability, or nationality). This course will also focus on the broader discourses on a 'global' level, examining human collaboration online for practices tied to elitism, the movement of social capital, racism, power, and the cultural production of inequalities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
230

ESOC314: Theories of New Media

This course will lay a foundation for theoretical analyses of how people socially create and negotiate information in the digital age. In addition, this course investigates a variety of approaches ranging from critical/cultural studies to positivist/behavioral research, considering the differing ways to think about social life and information in contemporary times. Broader paradigmatic assumptions (e.g., feminist theory, systems research) as well as specific theoretical topics (e.g., interactivity, mobility, telecommunity) will be examined. In addition, this class will survey the theoretical underpinnings of new media research across a variety of topic areas to include gaming, digital labor, communities, and global culture online.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
231

ESOC315: Publishing:Papyrus to E-Books

In the early 21st Century, we see publishing in the throes of dramatic changes, from print to electronic most obviously but also in who authors books, the economics of publishing, and how books get to readers. These changes remind us that the dynamics of the movement of the written word to its audience are an integral part of the society in which books are written, produced, and circulate. This 3-credit course takes an historical perspective on publishing, which we will define as the processes by which books come into being in multiple copies and are distributed to reach their audiences. We will start with ancient societies all over the world, and we will investigate the circumstances across societies in which books distinguish themselves from administrative records and begin to serve the needs of the literate elite. We will examine the way the physical form of the book and the technologies for producing it arise from the circumstances of each society, and in turn, how that physical format conditions the character of books and their use. We will trace the rise of publishing practices and identify the factors necessary for the reproduction and distribution of books to form an actual trade in books in varying societies. As we work our way from the ancient world to the early modern world, we will compare publishing practices in different societies and explore commonalities and differences in the relationships that develop between the creation, reproduction and distribution of books. Of particular focus will be our comparison of the rise of publishing and book trades in Europe, Asia, and the Arab world before 1450. After the introduction of printing with metal moveable type in Europe, associated with Gutenberg in approximately 1450, we will have an opportunity to observe the changes that this new technology makes in publishing and the book trade, by comparing the mature manuscript book trade of the late middle ages to that of the hand-press book publishing of early modern Europe. In the run up to the mid-term we will see the effect of monetary capital on the book trades and the shaping of the function of the publisher (although not yet called that). We will also examine related publishing matters such as art and decorative print production as well as the emergence and social role of pamphlets.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
232

ESOC317: Digital Crime & Social Media

This course provides a powerful introduction to some of the criminal activities taking place in relation to digital information, big data, and social media. Related to the exploration of criminal activity in an eSociety, this course focuses on some of the most common legal issues faced today, with regard to our own personal data (e.g., our health histories, our genetic make up, our cloud-based photos and messages, our past) and in relation to organizational or political data on social media and in society. In this course, students as future technologists, will be exposed to the 'dark side' of this current 'information society' (e.g., deception, cybercrime) as well topics such as big data privacy, digital disruptions, consumer data and related sales, gaming protections, youth safety online, big science data sharing issues and related trust, digital security, as well as how certain groups -- law firms, advocacy groups, marketing professionals, and political or lobbying groups -- are mining data for particular use. Students will be required to consider recent court cases and contentions around the use, management, and protection of data in society as well as the risk humans face in this digital information and mediated age.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
233

ESOC318: Disruptive Technologies

This course introduces key concepts and skills needed for those working with information and communication technologies (ICT). Students will be exposed to hardware and software technologies, and they will explore a wide variety of topics including processing and memory systems, diagnostics and repair strategies, operating systems in both desktop and mobile devices. As part of this course, students will consider current technological disruptions, those issues emerging as technologies and social needs collide. Students we also learn about design issues and user needs tied to mobile or computer applications and web-based tools, sites, games, data platforms, or learning environments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
234

ESOC330: Digital Dilemmas

This course focuses on the ethical issues that arise in the context of new and emerging information technologies-- e.g., threats to privacy of ubiquitous technological surveillance, limitations on access created by digital rights management. The course will use the framework of ethical theory to analyze these issues and to propose policy solutions. The goal of the course is to give students the necessary theoretical foundation to be involved in the evaluation and construction of information policies at the local, national, and international level. The course will focus on three core areas where digital dilemmas arise--information access, information privacy, and intellectual property. In order to achieve depth as well as breadth, the course will put one of these issues at the center and discuss the others in relation to it. So, for instance, the course may focus on Intellectual Property looking at the threats and benefits of IP to privacy and access. This syllabus provides an overview of the range of topics that may be discussed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
235

ESOC400: Info MM Design & Moving Image

We are living in a time when nearly everyone has the means to make movies, music and photos using just their own personal tools like smartphones, iPads, and similar mobile gadgets. This course will develop and refine skills and understanding of multimedia in contemporary culture. Offering a survey of innovative works in film and information arts, this course will allow students a hands-on opportunity to respond to concepts covered in class using self-produced media. This course will address how information functions in time-based forms of multimedia and video in this era of interactive information and displays. Drawing on historical precedents in the media and computational arts, this course focuses on both linear and non-linear approaches of using image, sound and text to create critical and creative works that function in a the context of social media and our contemporary digital society. How and why do certain images, music or films affect us so profoundly? We will address this question through a study of the components of media literacy that include: Production, Language, Representation, and Audience. These concepts will be examined through a cross-section of writers including: Marshall McLuhan, John Berger and Susan Sontag.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
236

ESOC414: Computational Social Science

This course will guide students through advanced applications of computational methods for social science research. Students will be encouraged to consider social problems from across sectors, like health science, education, environmental policy and business. Particular attention will be given to the collection and use of data to study social networks, online communities, electronic commerce and digital marketing. Students will consider the many research designs used in contemporary social research and will learn to think critically about claims of causality, mechanisms, and generalization in big data studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
237

ESOC480: Digital Engagement

This course is designed to be a culminating experience for the eSociety degree program, a course that engages students in practical activity as well as prepares learners for contemporary work. eSociety major and minor students as well as other undergraduates preparing for work relating to digital information or related fields can enroll in and will benefit from this course. Students will be given opportunities to discuss, review and reflect on their learning in their undergraduate work relative to an eSociety and will be provided the mechanisms through which their coursework can be applied to `real-world' contexts (e.g., internships, interviews with leaders in their area of study, professional shadowing experiences, service learning projects, or community-based event planning). Ultimately, this course provides students the opportunity to learn about what it means to be prepared in an eSociety as well as reflect on their own skill sets and the professional preparation needed for career satisfaction and success.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
238
Environmental Studies
239

EVS260: Envir Stds: Ideas/Institutions

This class analyses the key ideas, individuals, and institutions that have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally. The course provides an introduction to environmental writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international institutions that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of critical and iconic environmental cases and problems. The course is intended to provide the social science foundations and basic environmental literacy for the degree in environmental studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

EVS393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
240
Geography & Development
241

GEOG150B1: Geography and Global Issues

This course introduces students to fundamental issues and concepts pertinent to the study of individuals and societies. In focusing on models and explanations of how things are interrelated in earth space. Students are given a clearer understanding of the economic, social, and political systems with which individuals live and operate.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG150C1: Environment and Society

This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
242

GEOG170A1: Earth Envr:Intr Phys Geo

Introduction to fundamental laws of nature as expressed physical processes that govern the spatial distribution of Earth's land, sea, air, and biological environments. Focus on fluxes and feedbacks among these systems, and interactions with humans.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG205: Places in the Media

This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
243

GEOG210: Pol+Cult Geog/Globaliz

This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG220: Our Diverse Biosphere

The strategy is to immerse non-science majors in the biological aspects of Physical Geography and, through lively debate and discussion, maps and images, to enhance critical thinking skills students need to make decisions about the world around them.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
244

GEOG251: Wrld Reg:Comp+Glob Persp

Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG256: Sustainable Cities+Socs

Urbanization and cities within the sustainability framework. Global urbanization, social justice, environmental equity, growth management, "the new urbanism." International cases. Web based projects.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
245

GEOG302: Intro to Sustainable Dev

Introduction to Sustainable Development is a foundational course in understanding the policies and strategies that constitute "smart" regional development in US metropolitan areas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG303: Fld Stdy Enviro Geog

Methods used in environmental geography, including mapping techniques, use of global positioning systems, collection of various types of environmental data and basic data analysis methods.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
246

GEOG304: Water,Environmnt+Society

The course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales. Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG305: Economic Geography

Analysis and modeling of the spatial structure of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities; location theory and regionalization in economic systems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
247

GEOG311E: Geography of Middle East

Physical environments and cultural areas of Southwest Asia, with emphasis on people-environment interrelationships, settlement systems, and impact of Islam.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
248

GEOG315: GIST Programming I

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of programming for Geographic Information Systems using Python. Students will be taught elements, methods and theories of scripting in Python including how to write and manipulate functions, loops, strings, lists, dictionaries, and classes with an emphasis on how to apply these tools to writing scripts in the ArcGIS environment. The only way to learn programming is by doing, and therefore this course is based on weekly coding assignments, supplemented by traditional readings and lecture materials that will build students' conceptual understanding of their burgeoning skills. Assessment will be based on weekly assignments, two midterm exams, and one in class presentation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
249

GEOG330: Intro to Remote Sensing

Introduction to remote sensing principles, techniques, and applications, designed principally for those with no background in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG340: Cultural Geography

This course will approach the field of cultural geography examining theoretical foundations and practical applications. It will also focus on the interactive relationships between culture and places, spaces, regions, and landscapes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
250

GEOG357: Geograph Research Method

Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG362: Environment and Development

This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts
Terms offered: Spring 2017
251

GEOG367: Population Geography

Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG370: Geog of Intrntnl Dvlpmnt

Historical evolution of development theory and current debates in geography of international development. Planned micro to macro-level change over space and time examined related to employment, agriculture, food security, environment, migration and the household.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
252

GEOG371: Princ+ Prac Regional Dev

Introduction to basic concepts, objectives, practices and techniques of regional and industrial development as a professional activity, with emphasis on development problems and solutions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG372: Geography and Gender

This course is an introduction to gender and geography. Students will explore a cross-section of geographic research that provides a variety of perspectives on geography and women, gendered geographies, and feminist frameworks.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
253

GEOG373: Political Geography

Explores links between global economic and political processes, national affairs and local politics. Designed to foster participation; assessment is via essays and assignments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
254

GEOG378: Global Human Rights

This course will explore the meanings of human rights in different historical contexts, as well as analyze ongoing contemporary conflicts over the universality of human rights. Our analytical lens will include political philosophers, nation-states and international organizations, but we will also pursue alternative visions and voices, exploring how human rights debates in the "West" were shaped by an uneasy tension with colonialism and slavery. The course explores the role of major governmental and non-governmental institutions in human rights activism, and analyzes emerging approaches to transnational geographies of justice. We will explore the ongoing contested boundaries of universal human rights protection, including gender and human rights; the collective rights of indigenous peoples; prisoners of war; and the rights of non-citizens within a global human rights regime still largely scripted by the dictates of national sovereignty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
255

GEOG379: Urban Growth+Development

Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG391: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
256

GEOG391H: Honors Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
257

GEOG395A: Current Topics/Geography

Exchange of scholarly information and/or primary research through the Department's regularly scheduled Colloquium Series. Student responsibilities include critical reviews of presentations by local and visiting faculty. This course gives students a broad survey of the latest research within the subdisciplines in Geography.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
258

GEOG399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG403: Appl Geog Info Sys

General survey of principles of geographic information systems (GIS); applications of GIS to issues such as land assessment and evaluation of wildlife habitat; problem-solving with GIS.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
259

GEOG408: Arizona + The Southwest

The changing character of the land and human occupancy of it, with emphasis on Arizona; historically and problem oriented.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG416A: Computer Cartography

Introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
260

GEOG417: Geog Inf Sys/Nat+Soc Sci

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG419: Cartographic Mod Nat Res

Computer techniques for analyzing, modeling, and displaying geographic information. Development of spatially oriented problem design and the use of logic are applied to the use of GIS programs. Emphasis on applications in land resources management and planning.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
261

GEOG420: Adv Geographic Info Syst

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG430: The Climate System

Systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. Emphasis on circulations influencing geographic processes using examples of atmospheric environmental issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
262

GEOG455: Regional Geographies

Course provides focused training dedicated to a single region and can include fieldwork, lectures, and/or original research. Course may include 1 or more field trips.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG460: Environmental History: E Asia

This course explores the mutual impact of culture and nature - how the natural environment has shaped culture, and how humans have impacted the natural environment (and to take this full circle, how human-induced changes in the natural environment subsequently impact societies). The relatively rapid and thoroughgoing transformations in East Asia over the past century allow us an ideal setting to explore the interaction between culture and nature. Focusing largely on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, this course explores how the relatively new field of environmental history opens new dimensions of historical inquiry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
263

GEOG468: Water And Sustainability

Social and environmental conflicts over water are intensifying in much of the world. This course studies the physical basis, history, and political economy of water development and water policy in the U.S. and internationally.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG471: Problems Regional Dev

Topical issues in regional development, with emphasis on policy in diverse contexts and case study analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
264

GEOG476: Land Development Process

A case-oriented approach to site selection, rezoning, financing, architectural design, economic feasibility, and other facets of the land development process.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG483: Geog Aplcn Remote Sens

Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
265

GEOG491: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
266

GEOG497F: Comm/School Garden Workshop

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden. The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics. The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank. In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
267

GEOG498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
268

GEOG499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG500: Research Design

Focus on conceptualizing research projects and on writing and presenting a research proposal.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
269

GEOG503: Appl Geog Info Sys

General survey of principles of geographic information systems (GIS); applications of GIS to issues such as land assessment and evaluation of wildlife habitat; problem-solving with GIS. Graduate-level requirements include completion of a project on the use of GIS in their discipline or an original GIS analysis (100 points) in coordination with the instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG514: Anly Meth Plng+Str Mgmt

Methods and models for program planning and policy analysis; forecasting, service demand, facility location in capital investment programming, task sequencing, program analysis and evaluation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
270

GEOG516A: Computer Cartography

Introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis. Graduate-level requirements include an instructor approved 5-8 page paper on a related topic and analytical cartography demonstrating scholarly analysis in contemporary analytical cartography.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG517: Geog Inf Sys/Nat+Soc Sci

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display. Graduate-level requirements include a thorough bibliographic review and a scholarly paper on a current application of geographic information systems in the student's major field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
271

GEOG519: Cartographic Mod Nat Res

Computer techniques for analyzing, modeling, and displaying geographic information. Development of spatially oriented problem design and the use of logic are applied to the use of GIS programs. Emphasis on applications in land resources management and planning. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG520: Adv Geographic Info Syst

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized. Graduate-level requirements include a more extensive project and report.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
272

GEOG530: The Climate System

Systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. Emphasis on circulations influencing geographic processes using examples of atmospheric environmental issues. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a term paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG536A: Fndmtls of Atmo Sciences

Broadly covers fundamental topics in the atmospheric sciences. Topics include composition of the atmosphere, atmospheric thermodynamics, atmospheric chemistry, cloud physics, radiative transfer, atmospheric dynamics, and climate. Graduate-level requirements include additional questions on homework and exams plus a term paper on a specialized research topic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
273

GEOG550: Geomorphology

Processes, form, and dynamics of the fluvial system from source to mouth. Introduction to aeolian, glacial, and planetary geomorphology. Graduate-level requirements include additional discussion section once a week.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG555: Regional Geographies

Course provides focused training dedicated to a single region and can include fieldwork, lectures, and/or original research. Graduate-level requirements include writing original research papers based on original data collected in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
274

GEOG560: Environmental History: E Asia

This course explores the mutual impact of culture and nature - how the natural environment has shaped culture, and how humans have impacted the natural environment (and to take this full circle, how human-induced changes in the natural environment subsequently impact societies). The relatively rapid and thoroughgoing transformations in East Asia over the past century allow us an ideal setting to explore the interaction between culture and nature. Focusing largely on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, this course explores how the relatively new field of environmental history opens new dimensions of historical inquiry. Graduate-level requirements include extra reading of additional translations of primary sources, extra discussion time with the instructor, a research-oriented paper, and a different grading scheme.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
275

GEOG568: Water And Sustainability

Social and environmental conflicts over water are intensifying in much of the world. This course studies the physical basis, history, and political economy of water development and water policy in the U.S. and internationally. Graduate-level requirements include additional reading every week and a term paper instead of the final exam.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG576: Land Development Process

A case-oriented approach to site selection, rezoning, financing, architectural design, economic feasibility, and other facets of the land development process. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a series of research projects.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
276

GEOG583: Geog Aplcn Remote Sens

Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics. Graduate-level requirements include the completion of a project report.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
277

GEOG594: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG596B: Arizona Water Policy

This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Through readings, research, lectures, discussions and presentations, the student is exposed to major, current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them. The faculty draw upon their and guest-lecturers' experiences to demonstrate the development, analysis and implementation of real-world water policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
278

GEOG596M: Science and Decision Making

This seminar explores concepts at the foundation of the intersection between environmental science and decision, making as well as practical aspects of two-way communication to explore the ways in which exchanges take place between scientists and decision makers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
279

GEOG597F: Comm/School Garden Workshop

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden. The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics. The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank. In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum. Graduate-level requirements include a 8-10 page research paper that explores some aspect of wider impacts of community/school gardens. Expectations about this final paper will be provided during the first week of the course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
280

GEOG599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG611: Projects Regional Plng

Lectures, laboratory, and field projects covering various aspects of professional practice.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
281

GEOG619: Ecol/Savnns,Shrblnd+Wdln

[Taught Spring semester in even-numbered years] The functional ecology and dynamics of biogeographically diverse savanna, shrubland and woodland ecosystems will be examined. Interactions among co-occurring life forms and growth forms will be emphasized with in the context of climate, soils and disturbance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG641: Water Law

The course in Water Law traditionally emphasizes state law rules that govern rights to use surface water and groundwater throughout the country. Although we will give ample attention to the prior appropriation doctrine, riparian water rights, and various systems for regulating groundwater use, this course will also emphasize how federal law may impact water rights. Increasingly, environmentalists and others claim that there are public rights to water that may take precedence over rights under the prior appropriation system.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
282

GEOG695A: Current Topics/Geography

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG695B: Prp Fut Fac Geog:Prf Dev

A course designed to assist advanced graduate students in obtaining academic employment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
283

GEOG695C: College Teaching

Introduces graduate students to pedagogical theory, skills, practice and technological tools for college classrooms. Covers learning philosophies, cognitive skills, assessment, classroom dynamics and ethics. Provides practice in developing and presenting course materials.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG695D: Writ Wrkshp/Proposal Dev

Course is to assist advance graduate students in writing up a geographic research project or developing a proposal.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
284

GEOG696G: Urban Geography

Based on the exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting, this course examines contemporary developments in urban geography. The selected topics rotate according to the interests of the faculty convener and the graduate student enrollees. Generally grounded in theories of urban space, typical topics include urban politics and governance, economic restructuring, alternative urbanisms, gender and race, urban subcultures, migration and cities, urban form and the built environment, world cities, and transportation. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG696N: Geography and Social Theory

Based on the exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting, this course examines developments in socio-spatial theory. Selected topics and thinkers will rotate according to the interests of the faculty convener and the graduate students enrolled. Course organization may be historical, e.g., based on a survey of trends in socio-spatial theory, or thematic, e.g., examining the intersection between spatial theory and such topics as politics, resistance, feminism, globalization, etc. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
285

GEOG696O: Adapt & Resil Water Rsrc Systm

Climate change, urban growth, energy demand, and global food trade alter water in coupled human-natural systems. This seminar addresses adaptation and resilience using material on river basins, aquifers, infrastructure, policy, and institutions from Southwest U.S., transboundary U.S.-Mexico, and international cases.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG696R: International Environ. Policy

This seminar examines the challenges of understanding and governing environmental change at the international scale. The goal of the seminar is to provide an overview of the major scholars, theories and debates in the governance of international environmental issues such as climate change, land use, oceans, biodiversity, and trans-boundary resources; to critically assess scholarship and policy; and to understand the origins and impacts of international environmental policy in different countries and geographic regions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
286

GEOG699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
287

GEOG910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GEOG920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
288
Geographic Information Systems Technology
289

GIST214: Intro. to Map Science

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive introduction to the use of maps and map-like images for communication, analysis, and decision support.. Students will learn to acquire, read and interpret visual representations of the earth. These scientific principles are required for advancement and understanding of all geospatial technologies including geographic information systems, global positioning systems, and remote sensing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
290

GIST315: GIST Programming I

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of programming for Geographic Information Systems using Python. Students will be taught elements, methods and theories of scripting in Python including how to write and manipulate functions, loops, strings, lists, dictionaries, and classes with an emphasis on how to apply these tools to writing scripts in the ArcGIS environment. The only way to learn programming is by doing, and therefore this course is based on weekly coding assignments, supplemented by traditional readings and lecture materials that will build students' conceptual understanding of their burgeoning skills. Assessment will be based on weekly assignments, two midterm exams, and one in class presentation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
291

GIST330: Intro to Remote Sensing

Introduction to remote sensing principles, techniques, and applications, designed principally for those with no background in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GIST417: Geog Inf Sys/Nat+Soc Sci

Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
292

GIST420: Adv Geographic Info Syst

Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GIST483: Geog Aplcn Remote Sens

Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
293

GIST601: Intro to GIST I

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST). It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience. Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing and retrieving at will, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes. In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS. As Longley et.al., notes (2001, vii) ¿GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications.¿ This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology. Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI¿s ArcGIS software.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
294

GIST602: Intro to GIST II

This course focuses on providing students with an introduction to spatial statistics, spatial analysis and their application in GIS software, and GIS programming. Students will learn about descriptive spatial statistics, multivariate spatial statistics, and normality, how to analyze distribution, direction, orientation, clustering, spatial relationships and processes, and how to render analysis into cartographic form. GIS programming skills focus on calculating values needed for analyses, building models to perform repetitive tasks, and creating customized GIS interfaces.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GIST603: Adv GIST I

This course focuses on providing students with an introduction to spatial statistics, spatial analysis and their application in GIS software, and GIS programming. Students will learn about descriptive spatial statistics, multivariate spatial statistics, and normality, how to analyze distribution, direction, orientation, clustering, spatial relationships and processes, and how to render analysis into cartographic form. GIS programming skills focus on calculating values needed for analyses, building models to perform repetitive tasks, and creating customized GIS interfaces.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
295

GIST604: Adv GIST II

This course focuses on the integration of remote sensing with GIS and advance spatial analysis techniques. Principles of remote sensing examined include digital and multispectral image processing and enhancement, georectification, spectral characteristics, and land-use and land-cover boundary detection. As remote sensing deals with raster based data, there will also be an emphasis on integration of remotely sensed imagery and analysis with vector based data within ArcGIS. This leads to integrative (raster/vector) based issues such as projection, scale, map overlay functionality, as well as analysis techniques that require the transformation of data (vector to raster, or raster to vector) to perform advanced spatial analysis. The advanced spatial analysis portion of the course examines Z-score evaluation, point pattern analysis, kernel density analysis, spatial interpolation methodology, map algebra, and error and uncertainty estimations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
296

GIST909: MA Project in GIST

The Master's Project includes a formal report and presentation submitted in lieu of a Master's Thesis and reflects what a student has learned from the MS in GIST program. This course requires a student to formulate, design, implement and present results related to a specific normative and/or scientific geographic problem. This course will involve data capture, compilation and manipulation, and formulating methods and analysis to address a geographic problem in a given timeline. The geographic problem under investigation will require research to be completed out side of class in the form of field work, ground truthing, or background research in the library or through other sources. Your Master's Project can focus on subjects related to personal interests, work done through an employer or an internship, or work that is supervised by a faculty or staff members on campus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
297
Gender & Women's Studies
298

GWS150B1: Gender & Contemporary Society

This course will encourage students to consider the ways in which gender influences issues of self-identity, social differences, and social status. It will provide students with an understanding of the connections between individuals and institutions such as mass media, the disciplines of science and medicine, and political and economic systems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS150B2: Sex, Health and AIDS

Recognizing that HIV/AIDS has irretrievably changed the lives of individuals and societies across the globe, this course sets out to explore this social and disease phenomenon from a number of perspectives. Most importantly, the course approaches the topic with the recognition that most areas of concern surrounding HIV and AIDS are controversial and under debate, including the origins of the virus, ways to change behavior and conditions of sexual exchange, the social and economic causes of HIV transmission, funding allocations for research, and foreign policy concerning AIDS testing and funding.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
299

GWS150B4: LGBTQ Studies

Introduction to the study of sexual identities, communities and politics as they relate to gender, race and class in different cultural contexts. Special attention is given to social justice perspectives. Course is interdisciplinary in its approach, using literature, history, arts, and social science.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS200: Women+Western Culture

Examines the various ways in which women have been depicted in western philosophy, literature, and the arts from the classical Greek period to the present. Explores women's cultural expressions and representations of themselves.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
300

GWS202: Hist of Mod Sexualities

Cross cultural history of the relationship of modern sexualities and the rise of capitalism, secularism, urbanization, imperialism, sexology, and sexual identity politics from the eighteenth century to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS240: Gender in Transnational World

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to concepts of gender and an understanding of how gender shapes U.S. society, economy, politics, and culture. Through readings, guest lectures, discussions, films, and writing assignments, students learn how race, class, sexuality, culture, religion, and geopolitics inform gender. Focusing on topics including work, family, body, media, political organizing, and tourism, the course also explores how U.S. gender systems have shaped and been shaped by colonialism, capitalism, warfare, and interactions with people in other parts of the world, historically and now.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
301

GWS254: Hist Wmn US:1890-Present

Survey of diverse groups of women throughout colonial America and United States and their influence upon tribes, race, empire, politics, labor, economies, and society, 1890 to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
302

GWS299H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS305: Feminist Theories

Explores feminist theories from various disciplines, analytical frameworks, and subject areas. Examines the construction, differentiation, and representation of the genders in different cultural settings, and the ways that race, class, sexuality, and geopolitics inform gender.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
303

GWS306: Afr Am Autobiog:Wmn+Hist

Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity. Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals. While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them. It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS307: Chicana Fem:Hst,Thr+Prac

This course will examine the varied and evolving concerns of Chicanas as they forge new visions of feminism through the Chicano Movement of the 1960s; organizing among Chicana lesbian communities; Chicanas' entrance into academic, literary and artistic arenas; diverse community and national activist efforts in the 1980s; and current transnational initiatives.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
304

GWS310: Tran Studies:Politics Personal

Working with the assertion that "the personal is political" that emerged from Feminist of Color scholarship, this course will introduce students to transsexual identity and politics through memoir, autobiography, and self-narrative. Students will learn how transsexuals require a story that authenticates their identification in order to receive medical, legal, and social care. From questions about pronoun use to "When did you know" or "How do you know," transsexual identity has a unique relationship with self-narrative and the biographical. How has this biographical imperative of transsexual subjectivity shaped theoretical, political, and aesthetic debates in Trans* and Transgender Studies? Attentive to questions of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and ability, this course will study how "the story of self" reveals the bond between embodiment and subjectivity, experiential and the social, inside and outside, and semiotics and materiality.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
305

GWS330: Feminist Philosophy

This course explores the ways in which philosophers contributed to the development of feminism, and the ways in which feminist theory is expanding and challenging mainstream philosophy in turn.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS335: Gender and Politics

Examination of politics through the lens of gender hierarchy. Emphasis on how constrictions of masculinity and femininity shape and are shaped by interacting economic, political and ideological practices.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
306

GWS342: Writers, Women+The Gods

In order to conceptualize the way gender and ethnicity has shaped women's lives in the public and private domain students will "hear" the voices of African American women in ethnography, history and literature as we discuss the Africana concepts of life, health, beauty and family. The experiences of these women, as expressed in literature have become "formidable" presences in African American culture and history. The self-expression and self-definition, expressed by African American women's voices have generated social and political changes in American history that have also impacted the dominant Euro-American culture of American society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS372: Geography and Gender

This course is an introduction to gender and geography. Students will explore a cross-section of geographic research that provides a variety of perspectives on geography and women, gendered geographies, and feminist frameworks.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
307

GWS386: Race/Gendr:Gene,Form,Pol

This course examines the gendered constitution of race in the U.S., from 18th century naturalism and 19th century scientific racism, to 20th and 21st century eugenics, multiculturalism, neoliberalism, and "color blindness".
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS391: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
308

GWS393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
309

GWS399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS427: Women and Work

A sociological analysis of historical trends and current patterns of gender inequity in paid and domestic labor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
310

GWS430: Queer Cinema

This course provides an upper level introduction to LGBTQ issues in cinema, and includes films from the much acclaimed "New Queer Cinema" of the 1990s. Students will consider how gay and queer sexualities are produced in these films and what debates the films generated. We will study what it means to "queer" a film and the limitations of "positive images." We will also examine how alternative genders and sexualities are produced alongside ethnic, cultural, religious, and regional differences. Film studies background not assumed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS448: Sociology of the Body

Sociology of the Body examines the relationship between society and the human body, from broad issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, to everyday trends such as dieting, body building, and tattooing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
311

GWS450: American Indian Women

Interdisciplinary exploration of new information available on American Indian women, especially materials written by Indian women and investigation of the status, experience, and contributions of American Indian women from pre-contact to contemporary times.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
312

GWS455: Hist of Women In Europe

This course will examine the history of women in Europe for the past several centuries, exploring women's participation in social and family labor systems as well as religious, political and cultural life. We will explore how women simultaneously participated in and coped with historical processes such as changing religious and political systems, commercialization and industrialization, and state formation. We will examine major areas of human activity--economic, political, cultural, social, religious, intellectual, to see how they shaped and were in turn shaped by women's activities and women's experiences. We will consider what this has implied for women's autonomy, choices, and power.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
313

GWS457A: Manhood+Masculiniy in U.S.

This course explores the social construction of the male gender across American history, from European colonization to the present. We examine shifting norms and ideals of manhood and masculinity in the home, in the workplace, in social settings, and in politics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS469: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
314

GWS490: Women Mid East Societ

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
315

GWS498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
316

GWS499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS500: Spcl Tpcs Women Studies

Topics will vary. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings, a book review, and a paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
317

GWS569: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
318

GWS570: Feminization of Migrate

Worldwide human migration and displacements are at an all time high because of political, economic, and environmental upheavals. In the Americas, in particular, there has been a steady increase in migration to the U.S. from Mexico and Latin America since the 1960s. The most significant change has been the greater participation of women due in part to the negative impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) resulting in the impoverishment of agricultural sectors and lack of employment opportunities, a combination known to produce the feminization of migration. In this class, we will explore this phenomenon and the various challenges borne by women and youths. We will consider relevant theories, such as structural violence, as well as a wide range of perspectives, combining demography, history, ethnography and public policy analysis to better understand issues of borders, transnational identities, human rights, labor rights, and responsibilities of host and sending states.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
319

GWS586: Transnational Feminisms

The intellectual and political field of "Transnational Feminisms," although almost instantly institutionalized from the moment of its articulation, is still very much a field-in-formation. There are a lot of ways to articulate its roots and relationships. This course will draw from feminist anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, history (particularly subaltern studies and the history of U.S. imperialism), and postcolonial studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS590: Women Mid East Society

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities. Graduate-level requirements include an additional paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
320

GWS591: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
321

GWS599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS691: Presceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
322

GWS699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS799: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
323

GWS910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

GWS920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
324
History
325

HIST150C1: Europe in Modern World

Europe in the Modern World 1600-1989 presents student with the opportunity to inquire into the origins and development of the modern Western world. The goal is to instill a sense of the past as a viable part of any student's heritage, with all its diverse problems and rewards, and allow them to enrich their understanding of European culture through critical interaction with history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST150C2: Modern Latin America

An interdisciplinary introduction to Latin American societies from the 1820s to the present that gives special emphasis to diversity within Latin America and to dynamic and, hence, historical processes of social, political, cultural, and economic change over time.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
326

HIST150C3: U.S.Society+Inst Snc1877

This course examines and analyzes the social, political, and economic transformations of American Society since Reconstruction. It focuses on multiple levels of society as well as the groups and individuals who comprised it.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST150C4: World Hist 1600-Present

Survey of world history, 1600-2000, emphasizing cross-societal encounters.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
327

HIST150C6: Intro to Political History

This class will focus on persuasion and propaganda, and their role in political history. The course will show students how to recognize political propaganda, and how to distinguish propaganda from reasoned, logical political arguments. The course will have four components: First, it will examine the role of propaganda in totalitarian regimes, such as Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany. Second, we will examine more "modern" forms of propaganda, as it appears in political advertising, speeches, and newspapers in the United States and other western democracies. Third, we will study the use of logical political arguments, and how these differ from propagandistic arguments. Fourth, this course aims to improve basic skills, especially the incorporation of logical thought and analysis into the writing of student papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
328

HIST160A1: Colonial Latin America

This course examines 1) the history of Spanish and Portuguese exploration, conquest, settlement, and state-building in the Americas; 2) the impact of European colonization on indigenous American cultures and civilizations, especially the acts of native resistance, accommodation and adaptation that shaped the consequences of this cultural encounter; 3) the forced migration of African peoples to the Americas, including the development of slave societies, and the emergence of regional African-Latin American cultural traditions; and 4) the growth of multiracial social groups who developed new and distinctive cultural forms of their own and eventually came to challenge the cultural and political hegemony of Spain and Portugal.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST160B1: Hist Westrn Civilization

This course explores the civilizations of the West by considering the development of the ideas and ideologies that shaped the institutions of the West, development directed by Human interaction and conflict on a social, political, religious, and cultural level, in addition to the intellectual. Themes of particular interest include the structure and dynamics of power, competing configurations of deity and ritual, image and architecture as tools in the acquisition of authority, and the construction of a social normative on the grounds of class, culture and gender.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
329

HIST160B2: World History to 1600

Survey of topics in world history to 1600.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST160C1: Making Am Cult:1600-1877

This course introduces students to the history of the United States before 1877. It focuses on the creation of a distinctive set of American cultures. Central themes include the colonial meeting of Spanish, French, English, native American, and African American cultures; the development of distinctly American Creole cultures in the eighteenth century; race and conquest; the American Revolution and the creation of a republican political culture; the transformation of that political culture through struggles over industrialization and wage labor, slavery, and women's rights; and the revolution in American political culture and social relations during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
330

HIST202: Hist of Mod Sexualities

Cross cultural history of the relationship of modern sexualities and the rise of capitalism, secularism, urbanization, imperialism, sexology, and sexual identity politics from the eighteenth century to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST203: Anct Medt:Power+Identity

This course will focus on the ancient Mediterranean from 800 BCE to the XXX of the Roman Empire in the third century CE, emphasizing concepts of power and identity as demonstrated in politics, gender ideals, material culture and religious practice.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
331

HIST205: Ancient Hist: Roman Hist

This course offers a survey of Roman History from the prehistoric settlements in the area of the Seven Hills to the deterioration of the western Empire in the fifth century C.E. Special topics of interest include the material culture of the Roman world; the use of images in the pursuit of political agendas; classical notions of the divine; and concepts of gender, power, and identity. Popular representations of ancient Rome, specifically in film, will provide another area of consideration for comparison throughout the semester.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST210: Afr-Am Hist(1865-Presnt)

This course evaluates the experience of peoples of African descent in the United States after the Civil War. Reconstruction, "Jim Crow" segregation, "New Negro" Movement, Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, and the "Great Society" are the main subjects addressed in this class.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
332

HIST231: Music and Ethnic America, 1900

This history course focuses on musical expressions created in the United States since 1900. We will emphasize how musical performances and the consumption of popular music can reveal notions of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality that have circulated in the twentieth and twenty-first century United States. The course will pursue a thematic approach with a loose chronological order. Topics include, but are not limited to: corridos and ethnic conflict in the Southwest Borderlands; work songs, field hollers and African American labor in the rural South; the rise of ragtime as the first form of popular music in the twentieth-century U.S.; origins of blues traditions in the Jim Crow South; the Great Migration(s); women and blues performance; multiethnic contributions to jazz; "race records" and the segregation of popular music; creation of the country and western genre; white supremacist backlash to jazz and blues; the Swing Era; música orquesta and the Mexican American Generation; conjunto traditions in rural South Texas; race, rhythm and blues, and rock `n' roll; Black and Chicano soul music; queerness, race, and disco; Jamaican, Puerto Rican, and African American performance in the creation of hip hop; "gangsta rap," gender, and violence; Asian Americans and hip hop dance; international popularity of hip hop cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
333

HIST254: Hist Wmn US:1890-Present

Survey of diverse groups of women throughout colonial America and United States and their influence upon tribes, race, empire, politics, labor, economies, and society, 1890 to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST271: History of Christianity

This course examines the history of the great diversity of beliefs, practices, ways of life, and forms of authority among Christians, and especially conflicts about these. Not narrowly theological, the course construes Christianity broadly, treating, for example, society, culture, and art.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
334

HIST277A: History of Middle East

Middle East history from the rise of Islam to the Turkish conquest of Constantinople, 600-1453.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST277B: History of Middle East

Modern Middle East: the Ottoman Empire, Iran, and the Arab lands, 1453-present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
335

HIST278: Mediev Answ To Mod Probl

Discussion of essential texts from the Middle Ages which offer fundamental answers, 1) such as gender, class conflicts, death, happiness, and God. 2) gender is treated as an analytical topic. Taught in English.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST296: Special Topics in History

This course offers an in-depth exploration of a period or theme, chosen by the individual instructor. The specific period or theme will likely vary by semester. Students will be expected to read and analyze primary sources dedicated to the specific period or theme.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
336

HIST301: Intro Study of History

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the nature and practice of writing history and to teach critical reading, writing, research and analytical skills necessary for history majors. Required course in the history major.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST306: Afr Am Autobiog:Wmn+Hist

Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity. Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals. While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them. It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
337

HIST310: The Black Death

A lecture course focusing on Europe in the age of bubonic plague (from 1348 to 1720), with emphasis on changes in climate, food supplies, public health, epidemic disease, demography, and economy. The last third of the course will be devoted to the religious and artistic responses to disaster.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST312: Econ+Soc Hist Discourse

Compares historical narratives about economic theories in their contexts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
338

HIST315: U S Military History

Survey of American wars from colonial times to the present; military institutions, doctrine, application of the principles of war, campaign strategies and tactics, technology, and leadership.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST317A: Hist Early Modrn Ireland

This course is a survey of the history of early modern Ireland, starting in the 15th century and ending with the Union between England and Ireland in 1801. Students will develop an understanding of the problems and divisions that beset Ireland in this period and that have shaped its future until this day. The particular problems of political interaction, colonization, and the state formation as well as the contentious nature of religious developments in early modern Ireland will be addressed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
339

HIST321B: Britain 1914 - Present

Britain in 1914 was the wealthiest society in the world, with the largest empire the world has ever known. Yet this society was riven by class inequality and social and gender upheaval at home, while facing threats from overseas rivals and anticolonial agitation. In this course, we will explore how global war and economic upheaval produced cultural crisis and change; struggles over power and resources among different social groups; and changing understandings of government's responsibility for human welfare. We will also address impacts on the family and gender, as well as Britain's changing relations with the continent of Europe, its empire, and the wider world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
340

HIST354: U.S. History Future Educators

This one-semester, 3-unit, U.S. History survey is designed for history and education majors who anticipate teaching U.S. history in elementary, middle and/or high schools. The course units are aligned with the Arizona Social Studies State Standards, and the U.S. history content is linked to relevant Arizona and Southwestern history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST355: U.S. Environment History

Examines the history of changing relations between human society and the natural world in North America.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
341

HIST356: Global Environmntl Hist

This course will examine the ways in which different societies have defined, understood, valued, mapped, and made their livings in their environment. Also, it will explore how societies and environments mutually transform one another.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST361: U S Mexico Border Region

Evolution of the borderlands since the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on bi-national interaction and interdependence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
342

HIST368: Colonial Mexico

From discovery through the War for Independence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST369: Mexico Snc Independence

Struggle for political, economic and social stability; international relations, cultural patterns.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
343

HIST370A: Modern Jewish History

Survey of major political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the history of Diaspora Jewry: Modern Jewish history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST370B: The Jew Medieval World

Survey of major political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the history of Diaspora Jewry: the Jew in the medieval world (to the 17th century).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
344

HIST372A: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Biblical period through the Babylonian Exile; introduction to the Hebrew Bible.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST372B: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Ezra-Nehemiah to the Roman Empire, with emphasis on the formation of rabbinic Judaism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
345

HIST375: Histories of Memories

This course will examine modern histories of memories in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography and film, print media and visual culture. We will focus on the moments of tension where history and memory appear to be at odds, where competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict. Topics may include the aftermath of collective traumas (such as Sept. 11, 2001), genocide or war; the role of photographs, television and film in creating visually based memories of others¿ historical experiences; how institutions such as schools and museums, as well as memorial sites, contribute to the social construction of historical memories; or the course may focus on a single historical moment of memory crisis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
346

HIST377: Modern Israel

Evolution of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the present. Survey of the origins of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the Declaration of the State of Israel in 1948. Evolution of the State of Israel from 1949 to the present. Emphasis on interactive generative processes and understanding of the interplay between past processes and present socio-political realities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
347

HIST378: Global Human Rights

This course will explore the meanings of human rights in different historical contexts, as well as analyze ongoing contemporary conflicts over the universality of human rights. Our analytical lens will include political philosophers, nation-states and international organizations, but we will also pursue alternative visions and voices, exploring how human rights debates in the "West" were shaped by an uneasy tension with colonialism and slavery. The course explores the role of major governmental and non-governmental institutions in human rights activism, and analyzes emerging approaches to transnational geographies of justice. We will explore the ongoing contested boundaries of universal human rights protection, including gender and human rights; the collective rights of indigenous peoples; prisoners of war; and the rights of non-citizens within a global human rights regime still largely scripted by the dictates of national sovereignty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
348

HIST381B: Hist Of Muslim Societies

Evolution and global spread of Muslim societies, modernization and its problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
349

HIST385: Intro to Political Islam

Political Islam has become one of the most ubiquitous forces across the Muslim world in the last four decades. While most of these movements share a common commitment to promoting Islamic morality and resisting external forces, there is enormous diversity and change within what is generalised as "Islamism". Student will learn to grasp the basic differences as well as overlaps in identity and approach between the major streams of contemporary political Islam with regard to popularity and location, preference for armed vs. political strategies, nationalism vs. Pan-Islamist orientation, sectarian attitudes, levels of pragmatism, etc. Students are expected to be familiar with basic history, geography and religious terminology of the Muslim world prior to taking this course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
350

HIST386: Race/Gendr:Gene,Form,Pol

This course examines the gendered constitution of race in the U.S., from 18th century naturalism and 19th century scientific racism, to 20th and 21st century eugenics, multiculturalism, neoliberalism, and "color blindness".
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST389: Mid East Ethnic+Rel Minr

Overview of ethnic and religious minorities in the contemporary Middle East, study of ethnic and religious diversity and its origin and manifestations in the modern Middle East. Examination of how the concept of religious and ethnic minority has emerged as a key factor in state policies towards minorities as well as the cultural, economic, political, religious, and educational lives of its people.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
351

HIST399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
352

HIST403B: History of Hellenistic World

By reading and discussing many different ancient texts, including philosophy, Jewish histories and literature, and, especially, papyri from Egypt, you will explore the social and cultural history of the eastern Mediterranean from Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST404B: History Of Rome

The Empire through the reign of Constantine the Great.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
353

HIST407: A History of the Bicycle

The modern bicycle has been present in human lives for less than a century and a half. Yet in that brief period of time it has spread throughout the world and its popularity is near-universal. In this course we will trace the evolution of bicycle in four distinct ways: as a transportation device, with a gendered component; as a site for the development of human technology; as commodity for economic development; and as a device for human pleasure, leisure time, and exercise. We will explore its invention, growth, and development from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries in societies around the world. We will survey important developments in the history of the bicycle from approximately 1850 to the present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
354

HIST409: The Reformation

The Reformation in thought and action both from the perspective of its religious origins and of the political and social conditions. Analysis of its impact on sixteenth century Europe including the spread of Protestant reformation and its companion movement, counter-reformation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST420: Fren Revolution+Napoleon

The origins and progress of the Revolution in France.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
355

HIST436: Civil War+Reconstruction

Political, constitutional, economic, and military developments in the U.S. and the Confederacy during and after the Civil War.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST437: U S 1876-1919:Prog Era

Examination of economic, social and political developments in years of rapid industrialization from the end of Reconstruction through World War I.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
356

HIST450: Foreign Relations Since 1914

Examines the pivotal role played by the United States in world affairs since 1898, focusing on America's struggle with revolutionary movements in Europe, Asia and Latin America.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
357

HIST455: Hist of Women In Europe

This course will examine the history of women in Europe for the past several centuries, exploring women's participation in social and family labor systems as well as religious, political and cultural life. We will explore how women simultaneously participated in and coped with historical processes such as changing religious and political systems, commercialization and industrialization, and state formation. We will examine major areas of human activity--economic, political, cultural, social, religious, intellectual, to see how they shaped and were in turn shaped by women's activities and women's experiences. We will consider what this has implied for women's autonomy, choices, and power.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
358

HIST457A: Manhood+Masculiniy in U.S.

This course explores the social construction of the male gender across American history, from European colonization to the present. We examine shifting norms and ideals of manhood and masculinity in the home, in the workplace, in social settings, and in politics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST460: Environmental History: E Asia

This course explores the mutual impact of culture and nature - how the natural environment has shaped culture, and how humans have impacted the natural environment (and to take this full circle, how human-induced changes in the natural environment subsequently impact societies). The relatively rapid and thoroughgoing transformations in East Asia over the past century allow us an ideal setting to explore the interaction between culture and nature. Focusing largely on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, this course explores how the relatively new field of environmental history opens new dimensions of historical inquiry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
359

HIST465Z: History Central America

A survey of the history of Central American from the Spanish conquest to the present, focusing on regional economies, ethnic and class conflict, and the politics of state formation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST469: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
360

HIST473: Hist India+Pak:1750-Pres

Survey of political, social and economic developments in South Asia from the mid-18th century to the present. Writing emphasis for India-Pakistan specialization.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST479: Ottoman Empire To 1800

History of Ottoman Empire from its origins through the direct Western European impact, focusing on the political and social history of the empire in Europe and Asia.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
361

HIST484: Hist Arab/Israeli Confl

Origins of Zionism, and Palestinian and other Arab nationalisms from the nineteenth century and the post-1948 Arab-Israel state conflict in the Cold War era.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST487: History of American Journalism

The course explores the evolution of U.S. journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture. Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
362

HIST493: Internship

A work-related learning experience involving hands-on work and training in a history-related establishment, such as a museum, archives, historical society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST495A: Studies in Early Europe

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
363

HIST495E: Strggl+Surv Mod Me+N Afr

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST495K: Colloquium on World Hist

A colloquium or small lecture class intended for majors and upperclassmen; topics vary by instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
364

HIST496H: Nature+Practice of Hist

The culmination of the History Major, HIST 496H (the Honors History Major Senior Capstone equivalent to HST 498) allows Honors students to pursue in depth the research interests they have developed in other history classes. The department offers several sections of various topics each semester. Usually taken the junior year, this research seminar teaches students to organize, research, and write a substantial paper (at least 20 pages) or, occasionally, its equivalent in a different form. This project will constitute original research: it will base its argument substantially on a critical evaluation of primary sources (in the original languages when possible, or in translation). It will also actively and critically engage secondary scholarship. Although the research paper is the final product, students will work toward this through a series of structured, graded stages--for example, a research proposal, historiographic essay, rough draft(s), class presentation, and final draft--each of which may involve giving and receiving peer commentary.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
365

HIST498: Senior Capstone

The culmination of the History Major, HIST 498 allows students to pursue in depth the research interests they have developed in other history classes. The department offers several sections of various topics each semester. Usually taken in the last year in college, this research seminar teaches students to organize, research, and write a substantial paper (at least 20 pages) or, occasionally, its equivalent in a different form. This project will constitute original research: it will base its argument substantially on a critical evaluation of primary sources (in the original languages when possible, or in translation). It will also actively and critically engage secondary scholarship. Although the research paper is the final product, students will work toward this through a series of structured, graded stages--for example, a research proposal, historiographic essay, rough draft(s), class presentation, and final draft--each of which may involve giving and receiving peer commentary.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
366

HIST498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
367

HIST499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST504B: History Of Rome

GThe Empire through the reign of Constantine the Great. raduate-level requirements include an additional in-depth research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
368

HIST509: The Reformation

The Reformation in thought and action both from the perspective of its religious origins and of the political and social conditions. Analysis of its impact on sixteenth century Europe including the spread of Protestant reformation and its companion movement, counter-reformation. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST537: U S 1876-1919:Prog Era

Examination of economic, social and political developments in years of rapid industrialization from the end of Reconstruction through World War I. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
369

HIST560: Environmental History: E Asia

This course explores the mutual impact of culture and nature - how the natural environment has shaped culture, and how humans have impacted the natural environment (and to take this full circle, how human-induced changes in the natural environment subsequently impact societies). The relatively rapid and thoroughgoing transformations in East Asia over the past century allow us an ideal setting to explore the interaction between culture and nature. Focusing largely on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, this course explores how the relatively new field of environmental history opens new dimensions of historical inquiry. Graduate-level requirements include extra reading of additional translations of primary sources, extra discussion time with the instructor, a research-oriented paper, and a different grading scheme.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
370

HIST569: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST573: Hist India+Pak:1750-Pres

Survey of political, social and economic developments in South Asia from the mid-18th century to the present. Writing emphasis for India-Pakistan specialization. Graduate-level requirements include additional research or writing; see instructor for details.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
371

HIST579: Ottoman Empire To 1800

History of Ottoman Empire from its origins through the direct Western European impact, focusing on the political and social history of the empire in Europe and Asia. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST584: Hist Arab/Israeli Confl

Origins of Zionism, and Palestinian and other Arab nationalisms from the nineteenth century and the post-1948 Arab-Israel state conflict in the Cold War era. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and an extensive research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
372

HIST587: History of American Journalism

The course explores the evolution of U.S. journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture. Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper suitable for presentation at an academic conference or publication in a scholarly journal in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
373

HIST593L: Legislative Internship

Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST595E: Strggl+Surv Mod Me+N Afr

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
374

HIST599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST693: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
375

HIST695A: Adv Studies in U.S. Hist

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST695B: Adv Study in Lat Am Hist

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
376

HIST695Q: Comparative World Revolutions

This course studies the nature of some of the historical events that we call 'revolution' and 'popular movements', in comparative historical perspective, as well as the various ways in which historians, thinkers and political actors have tried to make sense of these very events.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST696F: Early Modern Europe

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
377

HIST696J: Latin Am: Modern Period

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
378

HIST900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

HIST910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
379

HIST920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
380
School of Information
381

INFO507: Information Research Methods

This seminar introduces fundamental methods for both qualitative and quantitative research in information studies. Additionally, the seminar introduces the student to established and emerging areas of scholarly research in Schools of Information to encourage her to identify a personal research agenda. The seminar is organized in two main parts: the first part introduces relevant research methods (quantitative and qualitative), whereas the second part overviews specific research directions currently active in the School of Information. The second part of the seminar will be covered by guest faculty who research in each of the covered areas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
382

INFO514: Computational Social Science

This course will guide students through advanced applications of computational methods for social science research. Students will be encouraged to consider social problems from across sectors, like health science, education, environmental policy and business. Particular attention will be given to the collection and use of data to study social networks, online communities, electronic commerce and digital marketing. Students will consider the many research designs used in contemporary social research and will learn to think critically about claims of causality, mechanisms, and generalization in big data studies. Graduate requirements include additional readings and a more in-depth final paper than is required at the undergraduate level.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
383

INFO515: Organization/Information

Introduction to the theories and practices used in the organization of information. Overview of national and international standards and practices for access to information in collections.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

INFO517: Intro to Digital Cultures

Digital information technologies shape our lives. The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy. Students will have opportunities for active reflection on the ways in which digital technology shapes learning and social interaction. Graduate-level requirements include different percent break-down of requirements and more stringent expectations in work produced.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
384

INFO550: Artificial Intelligence

The methods and tools of Artificial Intelligence used to provide systems with the ability to autonomously problem solve and reason with uncertain information. Topics include: problem solving (search spaces, uninformed and informed search, games, constraint satisfaction), principles of knowledge representation and reasoning (propositional and first-order logic, logical inference, planning), and representing and reasoning with uncertainty (Bayesian networks, probabilistic inference, decision theory). Graduate-level requirements include additional reading of supplementary material, more rigorous tests and homework assignments, and a more sophisticated course project.sophisticated application and technique.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

INFO589: Scholarly Communication

Structure and workings of scholarly communication and products in the U.S. Examines the content and technology of scholarly communication in various disciplines.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
385

INFO601: Intro to GIST I

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST). It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience. Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing and retrieving at will, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes. In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS. As Longley et.al., notes (2001, vii) ¿GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications.¿ This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology. Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI¿s ArcGIS software.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
386

INFO608: Managing the Information Org

The planning/evaluation cycle as an approach to assessing various information center services.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

INFO640: Adv Issues Archival Enterprise

This course considers different approaches to the archival profession. The course will conduct indepth discussions on theory and practice in the areas of appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, preservation, exhibitions, outreach, and electronic resource development. The course may include site visits to archives on or near the UA campus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
387

INFO671: Intro Digital Collection

This course will address the impact of technology on the fundamentals of libraries, archives, and records management. Many librarians, archivists, and records managers who have been working for even a few years find that they need to know more about working with digital information. The shift from paper to electrons caused a shift in the fundamental nature of the professions. To thrive in the digital era, they need new skills to accomplish many of the same tasks. Collections will no longer be physical, but virtual. Patrons will often be thousands of miles away, not just the other side of the reference desk. This course is intended to help you understand this new environment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
388

INFO675: Adv Digital Collections

This three-credit course is one of six required for completion of the Certificate in Digital Information Management (DigIn). This course will provide an in-depth look at the processes involved in building and managing digital collections and institutional repositories. The course will have a strong hands-on component in which students will apply advanced resource description methods to a collection, and then build a prototype repository along with a basic access system. Students will also analyze and discuss case examples of digital collections, focusing on technology management issues and organizational strategies for building different types of collections.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

INFO696E: Graduate Seminar

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
389
Information Resources & Library Science
390

IRLS600: Intro Grad Stdy In Music

Bibliographical materials; research resources, techniques, and problems directed toward graduate study in music.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

IRLS646: Hlth Care Informat Thry

Focuses on the theoretical basis of healthcare informatics with an emphasis on management and processing of healthcare data, information, and knowledge. Healthcare vocabulary and language systems, and basic database design concepts are addressed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
391

IRLS689A: Teaching Legal Research

This course is for students who seek to be law librarians. The course will meet once a week for two hours where the students will develop lesson plans and practice teaching legal research in specific areas such as the case, the statute and legislative history, secondary sources, non-legal research, CALR, administrative law and the internet. We will videotape their practice classes to critique and to allow students to monitor their own teaching styles. They will also develop web pages for the course. The course will culminate with the students actually teaching the Intermediate Legal Research (boot camp) class which takes place the week after the Spring semester ends.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
392
Information Science, Technology & Arts
393

ISTA100: Great Ideas of the Info Age

Important ideas and applications of information science and technology in the sciences, humanities and arts. Information, entropy, coding; grammar and parsing; syntax and semantics; networks and relational representations; decision theory, game theory; and other great ideas form the intellectual motifs of the Information Age and are explored through applications such as robotic soccer, chess-playing programs, web search, population genetics among others.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA116: Statistic Foundations Info Age

Understanding uncertainty and variation in modern data: data summarization and description, rules of counting and basic probability, data visualization, graphical data summaries, working with large data sets, prediction of stochastic outputs from quantitative inputs. Operations with statistical computer packages such as R.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
394

ISTA130: Computational Thinking & Doing

An introduction to computational techniques and using a modern programming language to solve current problems drawn from science, technology, and the arts. Topics include control structures, elementary data structures, and effective program design and implementation techniques. Weekly laboratory.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA161: Ethics in a Digital World

This course explores the social, legal, and cultural fallout from the exponential explosion in communication, storage, and increasing uses of data and data production. In this class, we emphasize the opposing potentials of information technologies to make knowledge widely available and to distort and restrict our perceptions. In a world of rapid technological change, topics include (but are not limited to): eavesdropping and secret communications, privacy; Internet censorship and filtering, cyberwarfare, computer ethics and ethical behavior, copyright protection and peer-to-peer networks, broadcast and telecommunications regulation, including net neutrality, data leakage, and the power and control of search engines.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
395

ISTA230: Intro Web Design-Development

An introduction to web design and development, with an emphasis on client-side technologies. Topics include HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), JavaScript, and web design best practices.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA251: Introduction to Game Design

This course provides an introduction to game design and teaches students the fundamental concepts for creating games. Students will survey many different games, exploring the issues game designers face when designing games in different genres. Students will participate in a series of game design challenges and will be responsible for designing and prototyping simple games using a game building tool. Students will present their solutions to these challenges in front of the class for general discussion and constructive criticism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
396

ISTA263: Learning in Information Age

Students will study how digital technologies are changing how people learn, how technology-based learning supports new approaches to assessment, how theories of learning are being developed to support research in these emerging areas, and how research on human learning is informing the design of computers that learn.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA301: Computing and the Arts

This course examines the ways in which computing and information science support and facilitate the production and creation of art in current society. A particular focus of the course will be to discuss how artists have used advances in technology and computing capacity to explore new ways of making art, and to investigate the relationships between technical innovation and the artistic process.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
397

ISTA303: Intro to Creative Coding

While the 20th Century saw the rise of the knowledge worker and the information worker, the 21st Century has ushered in the era of the creative professional. Our society is being rapidly transformed by new technologies that are revolutionizing many spheres of life, from entrepreneurship to artistic production. This course provides an introduction to software and hardware packages that are spurring innovation and creativity. Students will explore rapid prototyping, object design, and physical computing using Computer-Aided Design Software, 3D printing technology, and Arduino circuit boards. The Processing programming language will be introduced in this course and used to create generative artworks in both visual and audio idioms. An overview of creative evolutionary computation will survey applications of genetic algorithms and artificial intelligence for creating art.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
398

ISTA311: Foundation of Info & Inference

An introduction to the mathematical theories of probability and information as tools for inference, decision-making, and efficient communication. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, measures of information and uncertainty, discrete time/discrete state Markov chains, elements of Bayesian inference and decision-making, Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood parameter estimation, and elementary coding theory.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
399

ISTA350: Prog for Informatics Apps

This course will provide an introduction to informatics application programming using the python programming language and applying statistical concepts from a first semester statistics course. A key goal of this course is to prepare students for upper division ISTA courses by expanding on the skills gained in ISTA 116 and 130 but will be broadly applicable to any informatics discipline. Throughout the semester students will be faced with information application problems drawn from several different disciplines in order to expand their breadth of experience while simultaneously increasing their depth of knowledge of scientific and informatics programming methods. Students will practice problem decomposition and abstraction, gaining experience in identifying commonly occurring information processing issues and in applying well-known solutions. In addition, students will design their own algorithmic solutions to problems and will learn how to effectively compare different solutions, evaluating efficiency in order to choose the best solution for a given problem. Periodic code reviews will be held in order to expose students to a range of different solution methods, which will aid them in discovering weaknesses in their own work and will improve their ability to communicate with others on technical topics. The course will include an introduction to the python scientific computing libraries and other statistical packages. Additional course topics will include the use of version control systems, software profiling, general software engineering practices and basic shell scripting.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
400

ISTA352: Images: Past, Present, Future

A significant portion of the human brain is devoted to understanding spatial data and its relation to the world. Through the ages humans have naturally developed external representations of such information for communication, planning, understanding, and entertainment. Further, the digital age has led to an explosion of images available to everyone in forms that are convenient to share, manipulate, and automatically mine for information. In this thematic course we will study images from perspectives that transcend disciplines, and applicable to many of them, including the arts, science and biomedicine, computational intelligence, geography, and security. We will study what images are, how images are stored and distributed, the reproduction of images, how they can be manipulated, using images for visualization, and extracting semantics from images.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
401

ISTA450: Artificial Intelligence

The methods and tools of Artificial Intelligence used to provide systems with the ability to autonomously problem solve and reason with uncertain information. Topics include: problem solving (search spaces, uninformed and informed search, games, constraint satisfaction), principles of knowledge representation and reasoning (propositional and first-order logic, logical inference, planning), and representing and reasoning with uncertainty (Bayesian networks, probabilistic inference, decision theory).
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA492: Directed Research

Individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
402

ISTA493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment. Such work must be approved and supervised by an ISTA faculty member.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

ISTA498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
403

ISTA499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
404
Journalism
405

JOUR105: Principles of Journalism

This survey course provides an overview of news journalism, its history, future and role in a democratic society. It will cover the basics of journalism values, principles, law, ethics, writing and reporting.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
406

JOUR150C1: News in a Digital Age

From the days of hieroglyphics to today's hypertext, human beings have craved news and information. More than at any other time in history, the news media are in the midst of an information revolution, affecting social, cultural, economic, and individual change. This course examines the role of news media in a democracy, for individuals, groups, and institutions. The course explores where the ideological assumptions for a free press originate, how institutional structures for independent information operate, and how the media will face the challenges brought by unprecedented technological change. Pre-Journalism majors should not take this course but should take JOUR 105 instead.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
407

JOUR201C: Broadcast Techniques

This class will introduce to you to the visual techniques necessary for producing broadcast quality television news stories. The class is designed to help you learn the video production skills and video editing skills television newsrooms expect out of today's multimedia journalists.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR203: Photojournalism

Reporting news through images and graphics; introduction to all aspects of photojournalism, including law, ethics, history and critical decision-making.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
408

JOUR205: Reporting the News

Gathering, evaluating, and writing news. Completion of this course with a grade of C or better also satisfies the Mid-Career Writing Assessment (MCWA) requirement.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR208: Law of the Press

Basic legal concepts for print, broadcast, online, and photojournalism, including access to courts, public records and meetings; subpoenas and shield laws; prior restraint; libel; privacy; source confidentiality; intellectual property; obscenity; and FCC regulations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
409

JOUR280: Broadcast Writing

This course is an introductory class on broadcast news writing, focusing mainly on writing for television with some instruction on writing for audio/radio. Students spend the semester learning basic television and audio/radio writing formats. Ethics in broadcast journalism are introduced and discussed. Toward the end of the semester, students may combine their own original video to use in some assignments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR306: Advanced Reporting

Comprehensive and accurate news presentation with emphasis on interview techniques and coverage of major news stories. Completion of this course with a C or better also satisfies Mid Career Writing Assessment (MCWA).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
410

JOUR307: Principles of Multimedia

This is a multimedia course that will introduce you to multimedia reporting which is some combination of text, still photographs, video clips, audio, graphics and interactivity presented on a Web site in a nonlinear format in which the information in each medium is complementary, not redundant. Through interactive exercises you will learn about four basic elements: audio; shooting still photographs and video; editing; and storytelling using a variety of multimedia platforms.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR313: Reporting Public Affairs

Study and practice of newsgathering on executive, legislative, and judicial levels in city, county, state and federal governments, with emphasis on both deadline writing and in-depth stories.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
411

JOUR320A: Editing

Theory and techniques of copy editing and headline writing; introduction to layout and design.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR385: Beg TV Reporting+Prodctn

Course introduces students to television reporting and production and the ethical decision-making skills needed to success in the advanced TV course, JOUR 490C Arizona Cat's Eye.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
412

JOUR393: Internship

Work during the summer on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experience communication professional. Repeatable once plus one 1-unit part-time internship, for a total of 7 units.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR399: Independent Study

An extended exploration of a journalistic topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The project can take many forms -- research paper, investigative news stories, photo essay, broadcast documentary or online report.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
413

JOUR401B: Travel Writing

This course will develop your skill at writing engaging, insightful travel stories. You'll sample excellent pieces by great travel writers. You'll sharpen your skills of observation, journaling, researching and reporting while writing a travel/place essay and a destination story. You'll also explore how to identify markets for your stories and craft a pitch letter to publish your work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR401D: Food Journalism

Everybody eats -- but do we know what we're eating? In this course, you'll learn the fundamentals of writing about food and food production. We will investigate local food production as well as broader food system issues, including food waste, resource consumption, and food security in southern Arizona and the borderlands. We'll also touch on issues related to covering food and nutrition, food and culture, and the economics and politics of local and global food chains.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
414

JOUR402: Media & Terrorism

This course will investigate the interplay between terrorism around the world and media content about terrorism. It will focus on how news media portray terrorism and terrorists, and the effects of terrorism and media portrayal of terrorism on the public. While many of the assigned readings are about terrorism in the United States, including the 9/11 attack, perspectives from countries around the world are also explored. Students should keep up-to-date with developments in terrorism around the world, primarily through news reports. If events related to the course occur, be sure to bring the real-world perspectives into class discussions. Please note that some of the readings for this class will be challenging. Several explore academic theories and/or utilize complex statistical data analysis. While background in theory or data analysis can be helpful, no special knowledge is necessary to understand the material overall.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
415

JOUR405: Media Apprenticeship

Internship with a news organization supplemented with professional development, analysis of industry trends and best practices. Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR411: Feature Writing

Writing the feature articles for newspapers, magazines or other media; specialized reporting and writing techniques.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
416

JOUR430H: Inside The New York Times

This Honors course will introduce students to the story behind the story of the nation's greatest newspaper. The New York Times will serve as the text for this class, along with several books about The Times and the media. At the end of the semester, an optional trip to New York will include a visit to The Times at its new headquarters at Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st streets. We will also plan visits to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" and to the "Today Show" at Rockefeller Center, meeting UA alumna Savannah Guthrie. The course is intended to help future leaders in journalism, political science, law, the arts and the sciences gain news literacy, an important complement to critical thinking. They will also be able to describe and explain global changes, cultural and social trends and domestic politics. And they will get an insider's look at how The Times is produced every day and the challenges it faces in a digital world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
417

JOUR433: Digging with Data

Learn how to find, request and create databases, uncover stories using various software programs, and turn them into compelling visuals. Whether you call it data journalism, computer-assisted reporting, precision journalism, or power reporting, these skills will set you apart from your peers in any line of work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR455: Environmental Journalism

This applied course teaches you to write compelling, substantive stories that illuminate environmental subjects, trends and issues, often in human terms. This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news. We examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication. Guest speakers - journalists, researchers and other experts - explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment. Readings and discussions examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, risk, accuracy and ethical codes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
418

JOUR480: Advanced Multimedia

This is a hands-on advanced multimedia course that will provide students with the opportunity to refine their multimedia storytelling and technical production skills by producing journalistically interesting multimedia projects. The multimedia projects will be well researched and include some combination of text, video, audio, still photographs, graphics that will be presented on a website. Through interactive exercises and assignments, emphasis will be given to improving audio, video, still image capture and editing skills. This course is a combined lecture with outside lab work being required. Intermediate computer technical knowledge and skills, basic photojournalism and multimedia are required for successful completion of this course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
419

JOUR487: History of American Journalism

The course explores the evolution of U.S. journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture. Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR489: Survey/Research Methods

Expose advanced students to qualitative and quantitative research methods used in the social sciences; prepare students for designing and conducting research in upper-division courses.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
420

JOUR490C: Arizona Cat's Eye

Through extensive hands-on experience in this capstone course, students learn how to write, report, shoot, produce and edit news for broadcast.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR490F: Arizona-Sonora News Service

The goal of Arizona News: The HUB is to write strong enterprise stories and to present them in multi-media formats. Students will learn the techniques of search engine optimization and key word construction, all skills required in the marketplace today. Stories will be posted to the Arizona Sonora News Service and made available to media outlets throughout the state.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
421

JOUR493: Internship

Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experienced communication professional. If combined with two 3-unit summer internships only a total of 7 units is acceptable.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR493H: Honors Internship

Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experienced communication professional, performing to the standards of the Honors College.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
422

JOUR493L: Legislative Internship

Spend a semester working for Arizona Capitol TV, a nonpartisan office of the state legislature in Phoenix. Research, write and produce video segments. 12 credit units, usually split between two departments. Journalism usually uses this course as a substitute for JOUR 380, with the other units counted as upper-division elective credit.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR496L: U.S. Press and Latin America

This course will examine the history and development of U.S. press coverage of Latin America.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
423

JOUR497C: Reporting the World

This course is about understanding the world as a journalist, an international specialist or an informed citizen. It teaches how foreign correspondents gather news and examines factors that shape the global exchange of information.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
424

JOUR499: Independent Study

An extended exploration of a journalistic topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The project can take many forms -- research paper, investigative news stories, photo essay, broadcast documentary or online report.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR501B: Travel Writing

This course will develop your skill at writing engaging, insightful travel stories. You'll sample excellent pieces by great travel writers. You'll sharpen your skills of observation, journaling, researching and reporting while writing a travel/place essay and a destination story. You'll also explore how to identify markets for your stories and craft a pitch letter to publish your work. To earn graduate credit, you'll write a longer essay (750-1,000 words) and a longer destination students story (1,000-1,500 words) with at least six sources.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
425

JOUR501D: Food Journalism

Everybody eats -- but do we know what we're eating? In this course, you'll learn the fundamentals of writing about food and food production. We will investigate local food production as well as broader food system issues, including food waste, resource consumption, and food security in southern Arizona and the borderlands. We'll also touch on issues related to covering food and nutrition, food and culture, and the economics and politics of local and global food chains. Graduate students will be required to complete one food systems story in addition to the three writing assignments, but in lieu of the daily journal. The food systems story will take an analytical look at a large-scale issue of the food system -- obesity and hunger; access to healthy food; profitability of small farms; fishery health; ranchers and rangeland health; heritage versus hybrid crops; etc.-- and contextualize it with on-the-ground reporting in Southern Arizona. We will meet one-on-one to develop this story idea and discuss sources and research opportunities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
426

JOUR502: Media & Terrorism

This course will investigate the interplay between terrorism around the world and media content about terrorism. It will focus on how news media portray terrorism and terrorists, and the effects of terrorism and media portrayal of terrorism on the public. While many of the assigned readings are about terrorism in the United States, including the 9/11 attack, perspectives from countries around the world are also explored. Students should keep up-to-date with developments in terrorism around the world, primarily through news reports. If events related to the course occur, be sure to bring the real-world perspectives into class discussions. Please note that some of the readings for this class will be challenging. Several explore academic theories and/or utilize complex statistical data analysis. While background in theory or data analysis can be helpful, no special knowledge is necessary to understand the material overall. Graduate-level requirements include an extensive research paper on a topic related to media and terrorism. The final product will be a 15 to 20-page paper that will account for 30% of the final grade.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
427

JOUR505: Media Apprenticeship

Internship with a news organization supplemented with professional development, analysis of industry trends and best practices. Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper. Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR509: Internatnal+US Media Law

Basic legal concepts for media in an international and U.S. context, including access to courts, public records and meetings; subpoenas and shield laws; prior restraint; libel; privacy; source confidentiality; intellectual property; obscenity; and broadcast regulations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
428

JOUR511: Feature Writing

Writing the feature articles for newspapers, magazines or other media; specialized reporting and writing techniques. Graduate-level requirements include additional in-depth assignments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR533: Digging with Data

Learn how to find, request and create databases, uncover stories using various software programs, and turn them into compelling visuals. Whether you call it data journalism, computer-assisted reporting, precision journalism, or power reporting, these skills will set you apart from your peers in any line of work. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic of their choice related to CAR. Please confer with the course instructor early in the semester to have topic approved. This project will substitute for participation points for graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
429

JOUR555: Environmental Journalism

This applied course teaches you to write compelling, substantive stories that illuminate environmental subjects, trends and issues, often in human terms. This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news. We examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication. Guest speakers - journalists, researchers and other experts - explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment. Readings and discussions examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, risk, accuracy and ethical codes. Graduate-level requirements include writing an additional story and leading the writing workshops and case study discussion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
430

JOUR580: Advanced Multimedia

This is a hands-on advanced multimedia course that will provide students with the opportunity to refine their multimedia storytelling and technical production skills by producing journalistically interesting multimedia projects. The multimedia projects will be well researched and include some combination of text, video, audio, still photographs, graphics that will be presented on a website. Through interactive exercises and assignments, emphasis will be given to improving audio, video, still image capture and editing skills. This course is a combined lecture with outside lab work being required. Intermediate computer technical knowledge and skills, basic photojournalism and multimedia are required for successful completion of this course. Graduate students will be required to produce a well-researched and cited 30- to 45-minute in-class PowerPoint presentation on a documentary film or filmmaker. Acceptable subjects will be listed in the assignment sheet handout.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
431

JOUR587: History of American Journalism

The course explores the evolution of U.S. journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture. Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper suitable for presentation at an academic conference or publication in a scholarly journal in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR589: Survey of Research Mthds

Students will be exposed to qualitative and quantitative research methods, such as historical and legal research, media analysis, content analysis, in-depth interviewing and discourse analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
432

JOUR590C: Arizona Cat's Eye

Through extensive hands-on experience in this capstone course, students learn how to write, report, shoot, produce and edit news for broadcast. Graduate-level students serve as producers, directing efforts of undergraduate reports, camera operators, and film editors. They are responsible for accuracy, completemess, fairness and objectivity of news packages. Composition of a major paper concerning a media management issue is also expected.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR590F: Arizona-Sonora News Service

The goal of Arizona News: The HUB is to write strong enterprise stories and to present them in multi-media formats. Students will learn the techniques of search engine optimization and key word construction, all skills required in the marketplace today. Stories will be posted to the Arizona Sonora News Service and made available to media outlets throughout the state. Graduate-level requirements include double hours of contact time workload.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
433

JOUR593: Internship

Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experience communication professional.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR596L: U.S. Press and Latin America

This course will examine the history and development of U.S. press coverage of Latin America. Graduate-level requirements include a longer research paper and leading a class discussion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
434

JOUR597C: Reporting the World

This course is about understanding the world as a journalist, an international specialist or an informed citizen. It teaches how foreign correspondents gather news and examines factors that shape the global exchange of information. Graduate-level requirements include a higher standard of quality than undergrads. Grad students meet for a short session with the professor each week to discuss more theoretical issues or to examine international news items in more depth. Assignments 1. Will be required to read at least two books from the list (on D2L) or of their choosing ¿run it by the professor ¿ and write short reflective book reports (format on D2L). Due anytime before the last class. (10 percent each) AND 2. Will write an additional, short analytical research paper on a specific facet of either media coverage of, or international reaction to some aspect of your beat (3000 words). OR, will do a reporting/writing project focusing on some aspect of a refugee group here in Tucson. Must be of publishable quality. Consult early with the professor on the topic.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
435

JOUR599: Independent Study

An extended exploration of a journalistic topic under supervision of a full-time faculty member. The project can take many forms -- research paper, investigative news stories, photo essay, broadcast documentary or online report. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JOUR909: Master's Report

Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
436

JOUR910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
437
Judaic Studies
438

JUS103B: Elementary Modern Hebrew

Intensive introduction to establish foundation for beginning fluency in conversation, reading and writing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS160D1: Jewish Thought+Culture

We will explore the historical construction of Jewish culture as an organically developing constellation of multiple and often conflicting communities throughout history with varying religious ideas and practices.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
439

JUS203B: Inter Modern Hebrew

Instruction to achieve moderate fluency in conversation, reading and writing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS301: Jewish Civilization

This course is intended as an introductory survey and as a gateway to more specialized courses in Judaic Studies. Students will explore Jewish Civilization through selected topics that will address the questions of how and why Jews and their Israelite forbearers created, recreated, and give expression to their culture(s), and what significance that has had for them and for history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
440

JUS303B: Advanced Modern Hebrew

Advanced instruction in modern Hebrew language and literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS322: Modern Jewish Thought

Course traces the historical development of the many expressions of modern Jewish philosophy and theology since the seventeenth century.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
441

JUS332: Jewish Resp To Holocaust

This course examines the impact of the Holocaust on contemporary Jewish thought. The methodology of the course is interpretive and historical. In the course, students will explore theological and philosophical texts, Holocaust narrative and film, in order to understand the role of the Holocaust in Jewish history. However, the course will not focus on the historical events of the Holocaust. Instead, the course will be arranged thematically into three sections: The introductory section examines the anti-Semitism of the Holocaust in the context of the antagonistic relationship between Judaism and Christianity throughout history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS370A: Modern Jewish History

Survey of major political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the history of Diaspora Jewry: Modern Jewish history.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
442

JUS370B: The Jew Medieval World

Survey of major political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the history of Diaspora Jewry: the Jew in the medieval world (to the 17th century).
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS372A: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Biblical period through the Babylonian Exile; introduction to the Hebrew Bible.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
443

JUS372B: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Ezra-Nehemiah to the Roman Empire, with emphasis on the formation of rabbinic Judaism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS377: Modern Israel

Evolution of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the present. Survey of the origins of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the Declaration of the State of Israel in 1948. Evolution of the State of Israel from 1949 to the present. Emphasis on interactive generative processes and understanding of the interplay between past processes and present socio-political realities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
444

JUS384: International Human Rights

This course will introduce students to international human rights principles and aspects of transitional justice, while also allowing for them to understand the complexities of Israel and the issues that confront the state. Students will have a unique opportunity to consider the international framework of human rights from an Israeli perspective while attaining a better understanding of Israel internationally. Students will become familiar with the variety of international methods that might assist in moving the region towards a more stable co-existence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS389: Mid East Ethnic+Rel Minr

Overview of ethnic and religious minorities in the contemporary Middle East, study of ethnic and religious diversity and its origin and manifestations in the modern Middle East. Examination of how the concept of religious and ethnic minority has emerged as a key factor in state policies towards minorities as well as the cultural, economic, political, religious, and educational lives of its people.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
445

JUS394: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS409B: Biblical Hebrew

Study of Biblical Hebrew grammar and literature: Poetry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
446

JUS435: Kabbalah & Jewish Mysticism

Surveys the ideology, symbolism, and major themes of Jewish mysticism as evidenced in several prominent mystical texts. The core of this course will be reading the texts in English translation and the development of skills in reading and understanding a Jewish mystical text.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS456: Jews:Islam Wrld 1840-Pre

The course objectives are (1) to introduce students to the world of the Jewish communities in Islamic countries and (2) to acquaint students with the culture and history of Jewish communities of the Islamic world and the characteristics of Middle Eastern and North African Judaism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
447

JUS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS493H: Honors Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
448

JUS496H: Honors Seminar

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

JUS498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
449

JUS535: Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism

Surveys the ideology, symbolism, and major themes of Jewish mysticism as evidenced in several prominent mystical texts. The core of this course will be reading the texts in English translation and the development of skills in reading and understanding a Jewish mystical text. Graduate-level requirements include a substantial research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
450
Latin American Studies
451

LAS150B1: Mod Lat Am:Race, Rights, Revol

An interdisciplinary introduction to the people, place and cultures of Latin America and to the political, economic and social institutions and conditions of the region. Social Interactions and Relationships - The course examines how and why environmental quality, economic development, living conditions, democracy, migration, trade, religion and US policy vary across different countries and social sectors.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
452

LAS195A: Us-Mex Border:Sep+Integ

An introduction to the complexities of the local border reality and prepares students to better appreciate the challenges and opportunities facing the region from a variety of perspectives. Though not exclusive, areas of concern include business, trade, health care, education, environment, tourism, migration and security. An interdisciplinary approach to the transnational dynamics of the borderlands provides wide appeal across programs and majors. Guest speakers representing the different border region constituencies will complement the class lectures and discussions. Participation in this colloquium prepares the student for an optional field trip course (LAS 395a) to the border region and/or into the neighboring state of Sonora taking place over several weekends during the fall semester. Students will be evaluated on the basis of attendance and participation, a short reflection paper (3 - 4 pages), and a final oral presentation. Students taking the course for Honors credit will be assigned special readings and /or attend special related lectures to report on during class sessions and receive honors grading.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
453

LAS204: Comp Politics- Age of Globaliz

Survey of the major political systems and analysis of comparative political concepts, with a view to preparation for more advanced study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS251: Wrld Reg:Comp+Glob Persp

Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
454

LAS280: Brazilian Identity

This course takes representations and experiences of citizenship in modern Brazil as the springboard for the study of cross-cultural membership in society. How are understandings and experiences of citizenship bound up with the definition and institutionalization of race/ethnicity, class, and gender? This broad question will be examined in specific areas in Brazil such as public health, urban and rural development, environment, education, law, politics, and pop culture. The course covers theoretical readings and case studies from different geographical areas. Instructional materials are interdisciplinary, drawing mainly on the fields of History, Anthropology, Sociology, Political Science, and Geography.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS305A: Port for Span Speakers

Accelerated beginning Portuguese for speakers of Spanish. Taught by communicative approach and contrastive analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
455

LAS310: Afro-Latin American Literature

A bio-critical discussion/study of writers of African decent/extraction from Latin America.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS317: Latin American Immigration

Migration is currently re-shaping American cities, families, urban landscapes, rural areas, and politics, and altering the nation's racial and cultural make up. In response, societal attitudes shift and are re-imagined. This course examines the quasi-permanent presence of undocumented immigrants in the United States in an age of global movements, how this confounds established spatial orders that have conventionally defined nationhood, and the ensuing struggles for belonging and place within 'a nation of immigrants.'
Terms offered: Spring 2017
456

LAS319: Mexican American Culture

Historical background, cultural institutions, identity problems, social relations, and expectations of people of Mexican ancestry in the United States.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS330: Inter Conversation


Terms offered: Spring 2017
457

LAS331: Anthropology+Development

The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS334A: Mesoamerican Civil:Maya

The course provides an overview of Maya archaeology from the origins of agriculture through the Spanish Conquest.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
458

LAS335: Rap, Culture And God

Study of popular culture and religion in African-American and Latino/a communities, with a focus on the place of rap music in the cultural identity of these traditions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS337: Survey Mexican Folk Mus

Examination of the traditional folk music of Mexico and its influence. This course covers the history and evolution of the mariachi as well as the vast potpourri of Mexican music traditions. A working knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not required. Open to all undergraduate University students, regardless of major.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
459

LAS341: Trnsl+Intrp:Scl Just+Prc

Professional, social justice, sociolinguistic, and cognitive aspects of Translation and Interpretation. Includes language policy and social justice goals to providing language services for limited and non-English speaking populations, role of translators and interpreters, simultaneous and consecutive interpretation, role of norms in legal translation, meaning of translation, health care interpretation and translation, business and technical translation, observation of professional settings, translation and interpretation practice. This course is a prerequisite for the following courses: MAS 306, MAS 308, MAS 309, MAS 311, MAS 408, MAS 409.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS347: Politics of Latin America

Survey of the political forces and social groups important in shaping contemporary Latin America; examination of Indians, slaves, peasants, landlords, labor, the middle sectors, and the military; discussion of theories of instability.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
460

LAS350: Reading Literary Genres


Terms offered: Spring 2017
461

LAS354: Drugs and Violence in Mexico

The course will focus on the specific characteristics of the current conflict by learning about President Felipe Calderón¿s approach to combating organized crime, the involvement of the ATF and DEA in Mexico, and the important Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs), such as the Sinaloa Cartel, Los Zetas, The Gulf Cartel and their leaders Joaquin ¿El Chapo¿ Guzmán, ¿El Lazca¿, Osiel Cardenas, Miguel Felix Gallardo, the Beltran Leyva brothers to name a few. We will also discuss the Peace Movement in Mexico and the work that is being done to change the course of the conflict. As the semester advances we will discuss more broadly the social issues imbedded in this conflict and provide opportunities for students to arrive at complex understandings of the role of drugs and violence in contemporary society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
462

LAS361: U S Mexico Border Region

Evolution of the borderlands since the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on bi-national interaction and interdependence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS364: Dvlpmt in 20th Cntry Lat Ameri

This course offers a general introduction to contemporary Latin America from the perspective of political economy. It will focus on structural factors to help explain the main political, social and economic trends in the region. The overall goal of the course is to provide the basic, historical tools for understanding the current challenges that this region confronts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
463

LAS365: Hmn Rts Imm Enfcmt & US/MX Bdr

The American immigration and border enforcement systems have undergone radical changes in the last several decades and have become flashpoints of controversy across the political spectrum. Using a human rights frame, this class will take a critical look at the development of these policies and the ways in which they have impacted immigrants and their families. Using the latest scholarship and recent in-depth journalism, we will explore the component policies of these complicated systems, their dramatic consequences for undocumented and documented people alike, and possible avenues for change within a human rights framework.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS368: Colonial Mexico

From discovery through the War for Independence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
464

LAS369: Mexico Snc Independence

Struggle for political, economic and social stability; international relations, cultural patterns.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS371B: Span/Business+Economics


Terms offered: Spring 2017
465

LAS381: Medical/Business Trslatn

This course covers English/Spanish medical/business translation. It focuses on (1) building conceptual knowledge in the medical/business contexts and (2) language and translation competence in these settings. It introduces students to professional, nationally-accepted standards of translation practice and performance and uses authentic materials and contextually-meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS382: Legal/Business Translatn

This course covers English/Spanish legal/business translation. It focuses on (1) building conceptual knowledge in the legal and business contexts and (2) language and translation competence in these settings. It introduces students to professional, nationally-accepted standards of translation practice and performance and uses authentic materials and contextually-meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
466

LAS384: Lat Am Globalization+Dev

Analysis of how different waves of globalization from 1500 to the present have affected the economic and political development of Latin America. Applies theories of economic development and political sociology to understand the historical and contemporary transformations in social structures and institutions including the economy, government, and social stratification.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
467

LAS395A: LAS Field Colloquium

This colloquium is a logical sequence to LA S 195A and consists of multiple weekend trips into the state of Sonora. The objective of this field course is to learn first hand from public and private officials and academics in the state of Sonora about the border reality from Mexican perspectives. Visits to government, non-profit and business institutions involved in cross-border activities or research, participation in short seminars or workshops with Mexican students, and lectures or discussions conducted by individuals from the public and private sectors provide an interdisciplinary, international and global focus. Participation in all field trips and related workshops or discussion-groups and attendance at a pre-trip orientation and a post-trip wrap-up (50%) and submission of a journal of personal observations and reactions to issues observed, studied and discussed (50%) will determine satisfactory completion of course requirements. Students taking the course for Honors credit will prepare a special presentation for the wrap-up session and receive an Honors grade.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
468

LAS397A: Field Crse Latin Am Dev

Field Course in Latin American Development is an intensive study abroad course focusing on social movements and community development in Latin America. Students travel to Latin America for all or part of the course. This course is open to all levels and majors. For application instructions, see the Latin America program information on the website of the University of Arizona's Office of Study Abroad and Student Exchange at: http://studyabroad.arizona.edu.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
469

LAS399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS401: Major Works Latin Am Lit

Introduction to Spanish-American literature from the colonial to the contemporary period.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
470

LAS418: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS430: Brazilian Civilization

Broad survey of Brazilian culture. Thematic examination of some of the major cultural developments. Topics include: Brazilian music, Afro-Brazilian culture, the role of women in Brazilian society, Brazilian popular culture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
471

LAS435: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
472

LAS465Z: History Central America

A survey of the history of Central American from the Spanish conquest to the present, focusing on regional economies, ethnic and class conflict, and the politics of state formation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS469: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
473

LAS471: Beg Simultaneous Interpr

This course begins the in-depth study of simultaneous interpretation (continued in Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation). Its focus is (1) building conceptual knowledge in legal/medical/business contexts and (2) language and interpreting competence. Students are introduced to professional, nationally accepted standards of practice and performance using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS472: Beg Consecutve Interpret

This course begins the in-depth study of the theory and practice of consecutive interpretation and sight translation (continued in Advanced Consecutive Interpretation). It reviews legal and medical concepts and covers policy and law relevant to interpreter practice, theory, skill development, and special issues in legal, medical, and business settings using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
474

LAS481: Adv Simultaneous Interpr

This course continues the in-depth study (begun in Beginning Simultaneous Interpretation) of simultaneous interpretation. Its focus is (1) building conceptual knowledge in legal/medical/business contexts and (2) advanced language & interpreting proficiency. Students will review of professional, nationally accepted standards of practice and performance using authentic materials & contextually meaningful situations. Focus is on intensive skill development.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS482: Adv Consecutve Interpret

This course continues the in-depth study (begun in "Translation and Interpretation: Social Justice and Practice") of the theory and practice of consecutive interpretation and sight translation. It focuses on a review of complex legal and medical concepts; policy and law relevant to interpreter practice; theory; skill development; and special issues in interpretation in legal, medical, and business settings using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations. Focus is on intensive skill development.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
475

LAS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS493L: Legislative Internship

Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
476

LAS495F: Clq Latin American Stds

The exchange of scholarly information and/or research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
477

LAS497F: Comm/School Garden Workshop

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden. The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics. The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank. In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
478

LAS498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
479

LAS499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
480

LAS518: Southwest Land+Society

The course encompasses the greater Southwest, including northern Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Evidence from archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and biological anthropology is integrated. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of Indian, Hispanic, and Euroamerican peoples and their adaptation to and exploitation of the natural environment through time. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth familiarity with a subfield of choice through preparation of a substantial research paper (15-25 pages) and submission of weekly critical memos on required readings.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
481

LAS535: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness. Graduate-level requirements include projects with deeper analysis, additional three sessions to discuss their research projects, and research paper weighted twice as heavy as the undergraduate paper, with greater expectations in research, writing and analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
482

LAS550: Qualitative Rsrch Methds

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the use of qualitative research methods. We will examine data collection and data analysis techniques that are employed in qualitative research. Data collection methods will include: informal and semi-structured interviewing, direct observation, free lists, and focus groups. We will also cover the management and analysis of these data. Throughout the course, students will be asked to consider the advantages and disadvantages associated with each method and to consider alternate methods of data collection and analysis. The format is varied and will include lectures, discussion, group work, class presentations, and practical experience with the methods.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
483

LAS569: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am

This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis. Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
484

LAS570: Feminization of Migrate

Worldwide human migration and displacements are at an all time high because of political, economic, and environmental upheavals. In the Americas, in particular, there has been a steady increase in migration to the U.S. from Mexico and Latin America since the 1960s. The most significant change has been the greater participation of women due in part to the negative impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) resulting in the impoverishment of agricultural sectors and lack of employment opportunities, a combination known to produce the feminization of migration. In this class, we will explore this phenomenon and the various challenges borne by women and youths. We will consider relevant theories, such as structural violence, as well as a wide range of perspectives, combining demography, history, ethnography and public policy analysis to better understand issues of borders, transnational identities, human rights, labor rights, and responsibilities of host and sending states.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
485

LAS593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS595F: Clq Latin American Stds

The exchange of scholarly information and/or research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may be required of course registrants. Graduate-level requirements include review work of 2 speakers, provide the introduction/thanks for 1 speaker, and write 2 summary reviews for publication in LAS newsletter or Website.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
486

LAS596A: Latin American Studies

The development and exchange of scholarly information within the field of Latin American Studies, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS596B: Spcl Tops Caribbean Stds

The Caribbean along with other Spanish and Portuguese territories have been heavily influenced by the English, Dutch and French. This course looks at the settlement of the Caribbean with reference to those processes which frame contemporary society and public issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
487

LAS597F: Comm/School Garden Workshop

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden. The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics. The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank. In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum. Graduate-level requirements include a 8-10 page research paper that explores some aspect of wider impacts of community/school gardens. Expectations about this final paper will be provided during the first week of the course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
488

LAS599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS631: Anthropology+Development

The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
489

LAS659: Internat'L Human Rights


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS693: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
490

LAS695B: Adv Study in Lat Am Hist

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS696J: Latin Am: Modern Period

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
491

LAS699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAS900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
492

LAS910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
493
SGPP Law
494

LAW389: Sex/Race/Drugs/Power:Sup Court

This course is an introduction to selected substantive, procedural, historical, and institutional aspects of the law. Ultimately, it is about critical thinking and clear communication. Student will be provided with a rigorous understanding of the ways that rhetoric, argument, fallacies, values, and evidence are deployed in deciding fundamental social questions, using 15 cases from the United States Supreme Court as specimen. After hearing argument and analysis from leading legal scholars in their fields, students will engage in facilitated small-group discussions and complete intensive writing assignments. Students will develop their reasoning skills, becoming more critical thinkers and writers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW396H: Honors Special Topics Seminar

A special topics seminar for Honors-active juniors and seniors preparing to undertake a LAW thesis. Course may include small group discussion, legal research, guest speakers, and presentations on a variety of department-related topics of interest. Honors sophomores may enroll with consent of the department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
495

LAW401: Procedure

This course explores the legal process and procedures followed in our systems of civil and criminal justice. Topics will include the components of due process, adversarial legalism and the roles of attorneys, judges, prosecutors, and professional ethics, and the core elements of civil and criminal systems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
496

LAW402B: American Common Law System II

The American Common Law System II is one of two courses which conveys what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as a reflection and commentary on the history and politics of the American experience, from the early colonial period to the 21st century world of globalized commerce, human rights concerns and environmental and social justice. The course examines the history and sources of the common law, common law modes of legal rhetoric, argument, and communication skills and transformation and adaptation of the common law achieved through social justice and law reform movements. The weekly discussion sections will focus on the development of legal writing, research and critical reasoning skills necessary to solve legal problems, particularly in the context of predictive written communications to various audiences. The American Common Law System II course will focus primarily on Property Law and its intersections with Torts and Contract Law in the contemporary American legal system.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
497

LAW406: Visual Storytelling & the Law

Legal advocacy is fundamentally about effectively telling stories. Both inside and outside the courtroom, stories shape our experience of justice. Visual storytelling commands a unique power to evoke empathy and to serve as a powerful tool for public awareness and advocacy. Working collaboratively with faculty (an Instructor/Filmmaker and a Clinical Professor of Law), students will create a short documentary film about a social justice topic currently undertaken by one of the College of Law's clinics. In addition to making a short film, the class will embark on a journey of "media literacy" and explore questions around truth, ethics and objectivity as we consider how digital media (documentary specifically) may be used as a conduit to communicate the law's narratives.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
498

LAW407: Legal Analysis Writing & Rsrch

This course will teach students how to find legal authorities relevant to legal problems; how to analyze a legal issue using facts and law; and how to communicate legal analysis logically and concisely. This course consists of research exercises; writing exercises, including letters and legal memoranda; and more complex research and writing assignments. Students will work in groups and individually to learn the fundamentals of good writing and editing skills.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
499

LAW451: Intro to Public Int'l Law

For many years, but particularly since September 11, 2001, international law and international relations have had a major impact on every American, whether the issue is terrorism; the use of force by the United States and its allies; addressing climate change or mitigating world poverty. This course on public international law will provide an introduction to such subjects as treaties and other sources of international law; international law in the United States; principal international organizations; concepts of sovereignty, statehood and territoriality; the bases for jurisdiction; state responsibility; and international law and the use of force. It will explore international human rights, international environmental law and international economic law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
500

LAW453: Intro to Immigration Law

This course will introduce students to the basic legal and administrative structure of the U.S. immigration system. We will consider how the law determines who may enter the country lawfully, what rights immigrants have once in the country, and on what grounds they can be forced to leave and return to their home countries. As the class progresses, we will build on this legal framework to consider several of the policy debates regarding immigration that currently embroil the nation. In discussing possible policy reforms, we will consider a broad range of perspectives, drawing on academic scholarship, policy research, and judicial opinions that capture views across the political spectrum. Throughout the class, we will also ground our discussion in present day realities, by inviting in guest speakers, arranging field trips, and focusing on case studies of immigration policies that directly impact Tucson and its surroundings. At the same time, we will also broaden our discussion to encompass historical and geographic experiences beyond our immediate surroundings. We will repeatedly question the extent to which the immigration debates in Arizona are unique versus representative of the national picture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
501

LAW472: Crim Proc: Investig & Arrest

This course examines the legal procedures governing the investigation and arrest phases of criminal cases, guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. The tensions between public safety, national security, and privacy rights will be discussed. The course will also feature current, topical cases and guest speakers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW493A: Legal Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice of a legal nature in actual service in a technical, business, governmental or non-profit establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
502

LAW493B: Congressional Internship

Students can obtain credit for a 400-level Congressional Internship by working for a member of US Congress or Committee within Washington, DC or state offices. Students are highly encouraged to complete LAW 461- Legislative Analysis before applying for a Congressional Internship.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW493H: Honors Internship

Specialized work for University Honors students on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
503

LAW493L: Legislative Internship

Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon a student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees. Selected students will participate through one of four assignments based in Phoenix from January-May: - Support State Senators and legislative staff at the Arizona State Senate - Support State Representatives and legislative staff at the Arizona House of Representatives - Assist policy advisors and executive staff in the Governor's Office - Assist legislative staff at the Arizona State Supreme Court
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
504

LAW499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
505

LAW501: Procedure

This course explores the legal process and procedures followed in our systems of civil and criminal justice. Topics will include the components of due process, adversarial legalism and the roles of attorneys, judges, prosecutors, and professional ethics, and the core elements of civil and criminal systems. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
506

LAW502B: American Common Law System II

The American Common Law System II is one of two courses which conveys what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as a reflection and commentary on the history and politics of the American experience, from the early colonial period to the 21st century world of globalized commerce, human rights concerns and environmental and social justice. The course examines the history and sources of the common law, common law modes of legal rhetoric, argument, and communication skills and transformation and adaptation of the common law achieved through social justice and law reform movements. The weekly discussion sections will focus on the development of legal writing, research and critical reasoning skills necessary to solve legal problems, particularly in the context of predictive written communications to various audiences. The American Common Law System II course will focus primarily on Property Law and its intersections with Torts and Contract Law in the contemporary American legal system. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
507

LAW507: Legal Analysis Writing & Rsrch

This course will teach Masters of Legal Studies students how to find legal authorities relevant to legal problems; how to analyze a legal issue using facts and law; and how to communicate legal analysis logically and concisely. This course consists of research exercises; writing exercises, including letters and legal memoranda; and more complex research and writing assignments. Students will work in groups and individually to learn the fundamentals of good writing and editing skills. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW520I: Intro to Federal Taxation

Principles of federal income taxation, with emphasis on how individuals are taxed; additional topics. Graduate-level requirements include a special project and readings concerning current events and U.S. tax policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
508

LAW525: Native Economic Develpmt

This course examines the issues surrounding economic development as indigenous peoples and their respective organizations enter the 21st Century. The course will cover a broad range of issues including sovereignty, constitutional reform and by-law development, cultural preservation, securitization of resources, intellectual property, religious freedom, health, social welfare and education.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
509

LAW551: Intro to Public Int'l Law

For many years, but particularly since September 11, 2001, international law and international relations have had a major impact on every American, whether the issue is terrorism; the use of force by the United States and its allies; addressing climate change or mitigating world poverty. This course on public international law will provide an introduction to such subjects as treaties and other sources of international law; international law in the United States; principal international organizations; concepts of sovereignty, statehood and territoriality; the bases for jurisdiction; state responsibility; and international law and the use of force. It will explore international human rights, international environmental law and international economic law. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
510

LAW553: Intro to Immigration Law

This course will introduce students to the basic legal and administrative structure of the U.S. immigration system. We will consider how the law determines who may enter the country lawfully, what rights immigrants have once in the country, and on what grounds they can be forced to leave and return to their home countries. As the class progresses, we will build on this legal framework to consider several of the policy debates regarding immigration that currently embroil the nation. In discussing possible policy reforms, we will consider a broad range of perspectives, drawing on academic scholarship, policy research, and judicial opinions that capture views across the political spectrum. Throughout the class, we will also ground our discussion in present day realities, by inviting in guest speakers, arranging field trips, and focusing on case studies of immigration policies that directly impact Tucson and its surroundings. At the same time, we will also broaden our discussion to encompass historical and geographic experiences beyond our immediate surroundings. We will repeatedly question the extent to which the immigration debates in Arizona are unique versus representative of the national picture. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
511

LAW572: Crim Proc: Investig & Arrest

This course examines the legal procedures governing the investigation and arrest phases of criminal cases, guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. The tensions between public safety, national security, and privacy rights will be discussed. The course will also feature current, topical cases and guest speakers. Graduate students will be assigned differential graduate-level coursework outlined in the course syllabus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW572A: Addressing Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence present many challenges to the legal system, both because of its sociological dynamics and because it is one of the rare situations where civil court orders (in the form of protection orders) are enforced through the filing of criminal charges. These already difficult challenges are further complicated when issues of tribal jurisdiction are layered in. This course will explore those challenges and methods of addressing them.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
512

LAW578: Energy/Environ/Bus Strat

Analysis of issues and ideas that cut across corporate social responsibility, sustainable business practices, energy considerations, and environmental innovation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW582: Collaborate:Environ & Nat Rsrc

This course focuses on how to manage collaboration in highly controversial environmental and natural resource conflicts. The course will draw on cases from texts and articles as well as focus on several disputes that have occurred or are ongoing in the American Southwest. The primary goal is to help participants become better consumers and producers of collaborative processes and tools and to encourage thoughtful critique, analysis and evaluation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
513

LAW596B: Arizona Water Policy

This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Through readings, research, lectures, discussions and presentations, the student is exposed to major, current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them. The faculty draw upon their and guest-lecturers' experiences to demonstrate the development, analysis and implementation of real-world water policy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW596F: Thry+Rsrch Nonprof Sectr

The seminar examines nonprofit organizations and philanthropic behavior from a sociological perspective. We apply neo-institutional, ecological, social movement, and global society theories to understand the role of nonprofits in markets, political arenas, and civil society.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
514

LAW596J: Adv Tpc Socl Mvmnt Rsrch

Presents a sociological examination of both the emergence and outcomes of social movements, with an eye toward understanding the dominant research methodologies employed by social scientists studying social movements.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
515

LAW602: Criminal Procedure


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW603H: Lgl Analysis, Writ+Rsrch

The course will introduce first year students to a variety of kinds of legal writing and help them develop analytic, research, and writing skills necessary to communicate about law to a variety of audiences. The course will (1) help students further hone analytic skills introduced in first semester courses; (2) reinforce those skills by placing them in the context of legal research; (3) emphasize the need to identify purpose, audience, and context of each document; and (4) address fundamental writing principles of organization on a large and a small scale basis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
516

LAW603J: Sustainabilty+Env Policy

Over the past twenty years "sustainability" (or "sustainable development") has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making. Contemporary tools of environmental policy including ecosystem management, adaptive management, and restoration have been displaced by what seems like a clearer goal that captures ends as well as means. Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations. The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW603P: Legal Proc/Anlys+Writing

This course will (1) give students a broad, introductory overview of the American legal system, (2) introduce students to various types of legal writing, and (3) help students to develop the analytic, research, and writing skills necessary to communicate legal issues and arguments to a variety of audiences.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
517

LAW605: Property


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW606: Constitutional Law I


Terms offered: Spring 2017
518

LAW608: Evidence


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW608A: Public Health Law and Ethics

This course is intended to introduce MPH and DrPH students, as well as practitioners, to current and foundational issues in law and ethics that impact the policies and practice of public health. The goal of the course is to allow students to identify and appropriately assess legal and ethical issues that underlie the field of public health.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
519

LAW609: The Legal Profession


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW610: Healthcare Law Fin& Regulation

This course is designed to provide students interested in the complex field of healthcare law with a fundamental understanding of laws and regulations governing hospitals, physicians, and other providers, covering such matters as Medicare, Medicaid, tax exemption of certain providers, compliance with Stark Laws, fraud and abuse issues, provider antitrust issues, compliance programs, managed care, healthcare transactions, contracting and finance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
520

LAW611B: Employment Law

Course will examine a variety of topics in employment law and state and federal perspectives.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW611F: Negot Emplmt Agrmnt+Sep

This seminar will be an intensive study of the art and science of negotiating employment agreements and separation agreements. Although set in a legal background, the seminar will focus on how to achieve a successful result for a client, either an employer or an executive, without alienating the other party. Legal issues will be indetified and discussed, but no particular legal issue will be the subject of in-depth study. Rather, the seminar will focus on how legal issues impact the tapestry of a negotiation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
521

LAW614B: Corporate Compliance

Whether imposed by contract, statute, regulation, or international accord, Compliance has become a mainstay of lawyers and accountants in Corporate America. Given the breadth of compliance in business, the course presents a broad overview of compliance generally and more in depth review of specific, complicated compliance areas including the Internal Revenue Code, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Corporate Liability to Employees and Litigation Trends, Personal Privacy (Data) Concerns, and Environmental among others. This course also explores the origins and objectives of Compliance, the risks of non-compliance for companies and fiduciaries as well as specific regulatory frameworks and statutes that most affect corporate America.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
522

LAW615: Constit Law II


Terms offered: Spring 2017
523

LAW615F: Constitutional Theory Seminar

This course will focus on the major institutions created by the American constitution-Congress, the Presidency, the courts, and the states-and their role in constitutional theory and practice. At its heart, every constitutional case involves a choice between two or more of these institutions. It is therefore crucial for judges and lawyers to understand the strengths and limitations of each and the complex interactions among them. To that end, this course will equip students with a comprehensive framework for understanding, predicting, and comparing institutional performance. It will then apply that framework to areas of constitutional law ranging from the Commerce Power to the Nondelegation Doctrine to the Takings and Equal Protection Clauses.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
524

LAW620: Immigration Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW622: Law Review


Terms offered: Spring 2017
525

LAW624B: AJELP

The Arizona Journal for Environmental Law and Policy (AJELP) is a student-run journal supervised by the faculty at the College of Law. Students will perform tasks such as article selection, editing, and publication administration. For example, AJELP¿s Senior Managing Editor must coordinate the Journal¿s citation checking and general production, much like the Senior Managing Editors of the University¿s other student-run publications. Because AJELP publishes exclusively online, the Managing Board includes Online Editors who must maintain, design, and moderate its website. The Online Editors must also select, edit, and publishing online pieces such as article commentary and weblog posts. Online Editors perform work commensurate with that of Articles Editors from the College of Law¿s other student-run publications. The Managing Board also includes an Executive Editor, who will assist in editing the publication and provide the crucial administrative support necessary for a start-up student publication. The Executive Editor will also work with ALR and AJICL in creating and facilitating the write-on competition for first year students. AJELP¿s editorial staff will verify citations, format per Bluebook rules, edit submissions, and select articles for publication throughout the year. Published articles with a legal focus will not be subject to peer review, so citation verification and Bluebook formatting will be as critical and as time intensive as on the University¿s other student-run publications. In addition to assisting the other publications in grading the annual write-on competition, AJELP also requires each Editorial Staff member to submit a five hundred to one thousand word legal analysis on a contemporary environmental issue.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
526

LAW626: Jurisprudence


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW631B: Tribal Courts+Tribal Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017
527

LAW631D: Rebuilding Native Nations

This course examines the development challenges faced by contemporary Native nations. Utilizing numerous case studies and extensive research on what is working and what is not working to promote the social, political, cultural and economic strengthening of American Indian nations, the course emphasizes themes applicable to community development worldwide. Historical and relevant federal Indian policy and case law are used as background material, but the course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the "nation building" revolution underway in Indian Country. Additional emphasis is placed on how tribal initiatives can conflict with federal case law, state jurisdiction, and federal policies and politics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW631E: Law of Gaming and Gambling

This course addresses the fundamental legal question of how gambling is defined in courts in the United States. Because the definition of gambling for any given regulatory or prohibitory law is necessarily dependent on the reason for regulating or prohibiting gambling, we will also explore the specific concerns that motivate the prohibition or regulation of gaming.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
528

LAW631G: Tribal Jurisdiction

A combination of federal statutes and court decisions have created different set of rules for civil and criminal jurisdiction in Indian country than exists for the rest of the United States. This course will explore those rules, primarily through a series of hypothetical problems
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW631H: Critical Race Practice

This course, limited to twenty students, will explore the legal history of racism in the post-colonial and post-modern West from critical race and post-colonial theoretical and practice-oriented clinical perspectives. This seminar will focus on the difficulties in defining and understanding the meanings of the term 'race;' the nature of 'racism' and racial oppression; theories of racial formation; the differing implications of colonization and immigration; the formation of stereotypes; unconscious racism; the gendered and sexualized nature of race and theories of racial identity.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
529

LAW631J: Making Change Happen

This courses explores ways to assess and prioritize community needs with respect to nation building and uses case studies to explore how governments work within legal constraints to serve their communities and assert their rights.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW631K: Evidence for IndigGovernPrincp

This course explores the key research concerning Indigenous Governance Principles and how to understand what it means for your community.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
530

LAW631L: Constitutions of IndigensNatns

Considers the question "what is a constitution?" and explores different types of Indigenous nation constitutions, important concepts for constitutions to address, and the process for developing one appropriate for each community.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW631M: Comp Lgl Sys & Nation Building

The course will investigate the role that law plays in the lives of Indigenous peoples and their attempts to secure rights and exercise self-determination. It seeks to answer broad questions such as: "How does the law function to perpetuate a history of assimilation and racism?"; "How can Indigenous peoples use the law to secure rights?"; and "What role do legal institutions play in the process of Nation Building?" To answer these questions, the course draws from comparative sources with a focus on how the law can be used pragmatically to effect change.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
531

LAW633C: Secured Transact Article

This course will cover Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, which deals with secured transactions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
532

LAW633G: Adv Law/Entrepren & Innovat

The intersection of law and entrepreneurship is an emerging field of study. This course explores the legal issues faced by start-up businesses and the dynamics of entrepreneurial finance, including venture capital. This will offer advanced students the opportunity to advise the entrepreneurship teams involved in the McGuire Entrepreneurship Program. Students will develop skills in areas that may include the following: (1) development of founders agreements; (2) legal formation and capitalization of a company, including their tax implications; (3) identification and protection of intellectual property, including intellectual property that protects inventions (e.g., patents, trade secrets) and intellectual property that support marketing strategies (e.g., trademarks); and (4) business negotiations strategy and technology licensing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
533

LAW638A: Real Estate Transactions


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW638C: Business Planning

The course focuses on advising closely held businesses and their owners on various business matters. It exposes students to a broad range of legal planning challenges regularly faced by these businesses and explores how to handle them. Topics include choice of business entity, organizing and funding the entity, employee compensation, and multi-owner relationships.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
534

LAW639: Community Property


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW640A: Public Lands & Mining Law

This course examines the acquisition, disposal, and management of the public lands of the United States. Particular emphasis is placed upon the mineral land laws and the laws related to mineral exploration and development of mineral resources.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
535

LAW640G: Intro to International Mining

Overview of the technical, financial, environmental, social, legal, and policy issues related to the global minerals industry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW640H: Global Mining Tax Law

This course examines current worldwide approaches to mining tax policy by governments, the mining industry and civil society organizations; reviews required and preferred approaches to mining tax disclosure and the impact of that disclosure on sustainability; and examines selected mining tax laws.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
536

LAW641: Water Law

The course in Water Law traditionally emphasizes state law rules that govern rights to use surface water and groundwater throughout the country. Although we will give ample attention to the prior appropriation doctrine, riparian water rights, and various systems for regulating groundwater use, this course will also emphasize how federal law may impact water rights. Increasingly, environmentalists and others claim that there are public rights to water that may take precedence over rights under the prior appropriation system.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW643D: Native Am Nat Resources

This course will examine several themes: conflicts over which government has sovereign control over which resources; the role that tribal governments play in natural resource allocation and management; questions relating to ownership of natural resources; the changing federal policies relating to natural resources allocation; the role of federal courts, Congress, and Executive branches in relation to the trust responsibilities to protect tribal lands and resources; environmental protection, including EPA policy in relation to Indian Reservations; and natural resource development and management.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
537

LAW643K: Az Attorney Gen Clinic

In this clinic, students will work on various matters handled by the Arizona Attorney General's Office, including white collar, financial fraud and financial elder abuse investigations. The students will work with investigators to evaluate potential violations of law, draft indictments or civil complaints, evaluate potential evidentiary problems, participate in motion practice, plea or settlement negotiations, trial preparation, and, if necessary, trials. Students will work with and under the supervision of professor and Special Assistant Attorney General Jack Chin, and other Assistant Attorneys General. Because of the lengthy nature of investigations and litigation in the Attorney General's Office, students will be expected to enroll for two semesters. Some students will begin in the Fall, some in the Spring. Possibly one or two students can continue in the Summer as Interns.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
538

LAW644C: Int'l Bus Transactions

This survey course analyzes the key legal and practical aspects of doing business internationally. Designed for practicing international lawyers, government officials and as a foundation for many of the other economic law courses offered at Arizona Law, emphasis is placed on the international sale of goods (including terms, credit and insurance); transfers of technology (through licensing, franchising and distributorship arrangements), foreign investment (establishment, operation and withdrawal); and dispute settlement (choice of law, jurisdiction, enforcement of foreign awards). Key international agreements, such as the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards and the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials will also be analyzed, along with limited coverage of intellectual property issues. The "public" side of international trade law-- the GATT/WTO system, NAFTA, customs law, tariffs, etc.-- is not covered except very briefly in this course but is amply addressed in other Arizona Law course offerings.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
539

LAW644H: Intrntl Commercial Arbitration

A majority of cross-border contracts today provide for the adjudication of contract disputes by private, international arbitrators rather than governmental courts. This introductory seminar will examine the transnational consensus that has emerged with regard to international commercial arbitration, including the remarkable network of treaties and coordinated national laws that permit such arbitration and mandate domestic courts around the world to enforce international arbitral awards as if they were the judgments of such courts. Subjects to be addressed will include (i) the consensual basis of arbitration and the limits of arbitral jurisdiction, (ii) relevant norms that control arbitration, (iii) how to draft an effective arbitration clause, (iv) key elements of arbitral process and procedure, and (v) the effects/limits of international arbitral awards. The seminar will also feature a mock international commercial arbitration with student teams briefing and arguing a case.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
540

LAW645A: Trial Advocacy


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW645B: Trial Advocacy


Terms offered: Spring 2017
541

LAW645C: Trial Competition

The purpose of this course is to field two teams of four students (8 students total) to compete each year in the annual National Trial Competition, sponsored by the Texas Young Lawyers Association and the American College of Trial Lawyers. The first round of competition is a regional competition, (region 14, including Southern California, Arizona and Utah, in February. Regional finalist advance to a second round of competition in Austin, Texas, in March. This course is open only to the eight students selected to represent the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law in the National Trial Competition. The eight students, comprising "the team," who must be second or third year law students, will be selected in the Jenckes, intra-college closing argument competition during the fall semester.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
542

LAW646: Federal Income Tax


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW647A: Corporate Taxation


Terms offered: Spring 2017
543

LAW649: Economic and Dignitary Torts


Terms offered: Spring 2017
544

LAW649C: Complex Litigation

This course will study some of the most important issues in complex litigation. It will focus primarily on class actions as well as the contemporary civil justice reform movement and the rise of judicial case management. The course will be built around the following problems: How can courts resolve mass harms in a fair and efficient manner? How do courts solve problems created by the intersection of mass harms with overlapping jurisdictions that enjoy concurrent adjudicatory power? How do lawyers finance complex litigation? How do courts manage the burdens that complex litigation puts on parties? How do courts manage private litigation that has public regulatory effects?
Terms offered: Spring 2017
545

LAW649E: Advanced Tort Law

American tort law breeds controversy¿ damages determined by juries, standards that vary from state to state, punitive damages awards that provide plaintiffs more than full compensation. How do other countries address universal problems of injury response? In this class, we will learn about the tort law of other countries, particularly nations within the European Union and China. How do these countries view the mission of tort law? What sorts of standards to they apply to injured parties who seek recovery? Are common international norms developing in particular areas such as medical malpractice or products liability? What do divergences suggest with respect to potential directions for U.S. law? In this course we will learn more about other legal systems and discuss the ways in which those systems shed light on the unique features, challenges and strengths of U.S. tort law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
546

LAW649G: Federal Tax Policy

In this course, we will examine a number of the main theoretical issues in contemporary tax policy. While specific tax practice problems are not within our purview, we will often pay considerable attention to issues of practical implementation. We will also employ broader perspectives, derived loosely from economics and political science, to enrich our understanding of the issues. While the classes will include lecture portions, to provide background and develop the main issues for discussion, I am hoping that your responses to the readings and presentations - which often present conflicting points of view - will be a major focus of our discussion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
547

LAW650: Criminal Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017
548

LAW650A: Crime and Punishment

This course will explore the theories of criminal punishment in the context of examining the historical evolution of sentencing policies and procedures in this nation. We will focus particularly on the period of the mid-1980 to the present and the advent and role of mandatory minimum terms of imprisonment and determinate sentencing guidelines in dramatically increasing the population of incarcerated offenders. We will endeavor to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of such practices in protecting the public, deterring crime, and achieving justice for victims in an era of increasing competition for scarce tax dollars. We then will undertake to propose and weigh alternatives to incarceration for punishing various groups of offenders. The ultimate purpose of this course will be for each student to determine whether our current incarceration policies should be continued or, if not, what other alternatives should be considered or pursued.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
549

LAW651B: Judicial Opinion Writing

Students will learn about the process and ethics of judicial decision writing. Students will analyze and critique appellate decisions and practice adjudicative writing. Working in three-person "appellate panels", and utilizing real appellate briefs, students will collaborate to analyze a variety of legal issues, decide cases, and craft majority, dissenting, and concurring opinio
Terms offered: Spring 2017
550

LAW653C: Environmental Moot Court

The purpose of this course is to field a team of three law students to compete each year in the Pace Law School National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition held in White Plains, New York. This course is open only to the three students selected to represent the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in the Pace Competition. The team will produce an outline and a first and a final draft of a significant appellate brief of approximately 30 pages in length. The students will then attend and participate in the Pace Law School Moot Court Competition at Pace Law School.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
551

LAW654A: Bioethics and Law

This course studies the ethical, legal, and public policy ramifications of scientific and medical advances that fragment and rearrange certain natural processes, conditions, or relationships and social arrangements resting on them. Specific areas of investigation include biomedical research and experimentation; mind and behavior control; reproductive technology; genetic control and manipulation; death and dying; transplantation and implantation of natural and artificial organs and tissues; and enhancement of human attributes. The course will cover basic ethical theories and jurisprudential concepts that are relevant to analysis of the various subject matter areas. It will also entail examination of a broad array of cases, statutes, and administrative materials that have already been promulgated or proposed to deal with legal issues raised or portended by scientific and medical advances. These materials cut across many areas of the law, including constitutional, tort, property, contract, and administrative law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
552

LAW654D: Contract Drafting

This course focuses on the 'hows' and 'whys' of contract-drafting and generally accepted drafting practices of transactional attorneys. It explores the importance of those skills and the reasons behind those practices. Student assignments will simulate real-world legal experience.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW654E: Transactional Law Meet Skills

The course will serve as the cornerstone for the College of Law's transactional law team. In that regard, it will cover deal law and process, contract drafting, mark-up conventions, negotiations, and client interaction. The course will be offered in the fall to prepare students to participate in the National Transactional LawMeet in the spring. This meet is the premier interscholastic competition for law students interested in transactional practice. It provides students with a taste of "doing deals." The team will be selected based on course performance. A student must take the course to be eligible for the team.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
553

LAW655A: Trdmrks+Unfair Compet


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW655B: Copyright Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017
554

LAW655D: Journal of Emerging Technology

AZJet is a student-run journal supervised by the faculty at the College of Law, publishing legal scholarship at the intersection of law and emerging technology. Offers publication opportunities to computer science and other technical departments, as well as Law. Numerous positions are open for both legal and technical disciplines.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
555

LAW655M: State+Local Taxation

This course has two major components. First, the federal constraints on state taxation are explored. Specifically addressed are the Commerce Clause, Equal Protection Clause, Due Process Clause, Privileges and Immunities Clause, and several federal statutes. Second, students learn the basic structure and operation of the three major sources of state and local tax revenue: the sales, income, and property tax. Taxation on Indian Lands will also be addressed. Most state tax systems were developed in a far simpler time. Thus, a major theme of the course is tension between often anachronistic state tax systems and a changing world. The course does not concentrate on the law of any particular state nor is any other prior course in taxation required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
556

LAW655P: Corporate Governance

This course will explore some of the major corporate governance issues confronting public corporations in the United States today. The course will explore the techniques being developed to assure that corporate management properly serves the goals of the corporation and its shareholders. It will examine in depth the definition of corporate objectives, the role of the board of directors and board committees, the methods of electing boards and holding them accountable, and the role of lawyers and independent accountants in the governance process.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW655R: Intellectual Prop Law

This is a survey course covering the main areas of intellectual property law - patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets. It introduces each subject and explores commonalities and differences among different systems of intellectual property protection. This course is intended for the non-specialist interested in a general introduction to intellectual property law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
557

LAW655V: Patent Litigation Fundamentls

This course is designed for students who want to learn about patent litigation from either a litigation or business perspective. The course should appeal to students who are interested in technology-based litigation, those who are thinking of specializing in patent prosecution, as well as those who are interested in learning how to evaluate the risks and benefits associated with actual and potential patent suits from the perspective of a venture capitalist or business lawyer.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW656A: Intergovernmental Relations

The course will address the relationship between Indigenous nations and other governments.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
558

LAW656B: Comparative Indigenous Governa

The course will examine different Indigenous systems across the world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW656F: Clt Prop Indigenous Peop

This course will cover tangible and intellectual cultural property, its identity, ownership, appropriation and repatriation and will begin with the history of the appropriation of cultural materials and the development of national and international laws.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
559

LAW656J: Nat Security Law+Litigat

This class will address the law governing national security investigations, foreign and domestic, and related litigation. Topics will include electronic surveillance, FISA, the Terrorist Surveillance Program, the Classified Information Procedures Act encompassing the handling of classified information at trial, and recent cases in national security law. We will complete the class with a practical problem regarding the federal response to a bioterrorist attack. National Security Law is often inaccessible, and can be particularly hard to follow when divorced from the context of historical tradition, governmental structures and the operational reality in which it functions. Without disclosing and classified or confidential information, this class will attempt to present the law in context.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
560

LAW656P: Prosecution+Adjudication

This course examines pretrial and trial procedures. The course begins at the point where a suspect has been arrested. The police and investigators have finished their work, and it is time for lawyers to take control of each case and of the criminal process. The first (and some would say defining) question for this course is which lawyer a defendant will receive, with what kind of expertise, caseload, and resources, and when that lawyer will first appear. This class ends at the point where issues of sentencing, punishment, appeals and post-conviction review arise.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW657B: Case Stdy in Patent Litigation

This short course focuses on the Apple v. Samsung litigation currently pending in the Northern District of California (Case No. 11-cv-01846-LHK-PSG). Students taking the class will do a post-mortem of the litigation, focusing on selected, patent-related topics pivotal to the outcome of the litigation. Readings will be based on actual court filings from the Apple v. Samsung litigation. The course will give students interested in patent law or patent litigation an opportunity to practice some of the skills that they acquired while taking Patent Law course or Patent Litigation Fundamentals course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
561

LAW659: Internat'L Human Rights


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW661A: Moot Court National Team


Terms offered: Spring 2017
562

LAW661B: Moot Court Board


Terms offered: Spring 2017
563

LAW661C: NALSA Moot Court

This course is for students who are representing the College of Law at the National NALSA Moot Court Competition. Each year, the team(s) will be selected in the early fall. The competition problem is traditionally released in the middle of the Fall semester, with the brief due in January and the competition itself in February. The students chosen for the team will meet on a regular basis to prepare for the competition. The content and timing of the meetings will vary and will depend on the competition time table. Students will be expected to meet with each other and with the coach regarding brief writing and oral arguments. Students who are unable or unwilling to attend the vast majority of scheduled meetings will be dropped from the team.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
564

LAW663: Intro Bus Reorg/Bankrupt

This course develops issues arising in Chapter 11 business reorganization bankruptcy cases. Pieces of the puzzle include an overview of the Bankruptcy Code; understanding secured, unsecured and priority claims; property of the estate; the automatic stay; use, sale or lease of property; executory contracts; avoidance powers of the trustee or debtor in possession, substantive consolidation or joint administration; negotiation and confirmation of a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization; allowance, disallowance and equitable subordination of claims; and ethical issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
565

LAW667A: Sentencing Law

This class examines the principles and practices of sentencing. Any brief study of sentencing can only hint at the rich and complex field that has emerged indeed, that has been created, in the past twenty years. While sentencing as an aspect of the legal process has been around for several thousand years, sentencing as a distinct field of study and practice is quite a recent event. Sentencing reform movements revealed a gap in law, a lawlessness in many of the justice systems in the U.S. for most of the 20th century. But what has filled that gap in many systems (sentencing guidelines) is one of the most controversial law reform projects of our era.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
566

LAW668: Pre-Trial Litigation


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW669: Environmental Law


Terms offered: Spring 2017
567

LAW671: Law And Humanities


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW678: Jessup Moot Court

The Jessup International Moot Court Competition is an international law advocacy competition. The Jessup promotes awareness, study and understanding of international issues and law. Students research and write an advocacy brief on issues of international concern and practice oral argumentation during the course. This course runs for the entire academic year and is divided into Jessup I and Jessup II. Jessup I is offered for 2 units; pass/fail; Jessup II is offered for 1 unit, pass/fail.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
568

LAW680B: Mediation


Terms offered: Spring 2017
569

LAW681A: Case Stds Pub Interest & Prof

In conjunction with public service summer employment, students will study 1) the agency's impact on and definition of its client(s); 2) the lawyer's role, in particular the lawyer's ethical responsibilities and challenges, and the lawyer as decision maker and public policy maker or precedent setter; and 3) at least one individual case or project on which the student is working as part of the student's summer agency placement. The course will require students to attend pre-and/or post-agency placement sessions where issues of the unique role of agency attorneys, as will as the particular ethical responsibilities of agency attorneys, are addressed. This course will be carried over from Summer I to Summer II without the students having to re-register for the course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
570

LAW681B: Anatomy of a Criminal Case

This course will focus upon the development of facts by lawyers in criminal cases, in and out of court, from the perspective of both state and federal courts and the use of out of court fact development tools such as investigators, computers and public record requests.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW684: Law and the Elderly


Terms offered: Spring 2017
571

LAW686: Intnl Law Journal


Terms offered: Spring 2017
572

LAW689A: Teaching Legal Research

This course is for students who seek to be law librarians. The course will meet once a week for two hours where the students will develop lesson plans and practice teaching legal research in specific areas such as the case, the statute and legislative history, secondary sources, non-legal research, CALR, administrative law and the internet. We will videotape their practice classes to critique and to allow students to monitor their own teaching styles. They will also develop web pages for the course. The course will culminate with the students actually teaching the Intermediate Legal Research (boot camp) class which takes place the week after the Spring semester ends.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
573

LAW689B: Administrative Law Research

This course will focus on administrative law research skills. These skills are important because so many areas of law in our modern economy are heavily regulated by agencies (tax, securities, environmental, health and welfare, to name only a few). There is no focus on one specific area of law; the idea is that once students understand administrative law research in general they can use their knowledge to quickly master research in their own areas of interest. By the end of the course, students will understand administrative law research and demonstrate mastery of strategies for finding the primary and secondary information necessary to answer legal questions and develop legal arguments. Toward that end, students will thoroughly examine agencies and their powers, state and federal regulatory processes, organization of administrative law materials, and a variety of online sources of administrative law. Students will learn to efficiently utilize a variety of free and commercial sources and employ a variety of search strategies to find regulations, enabling and authorizing statutes, administrative decisions, guidance documents, executive orders, cases, and secondary source information. In addition, students will learn different techniques for tracking regulatory developments and participating in the regulatory process.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
574

LAW692A: Information Privacy

This course will explore a range of contexts in which the courts (and other branches of government) have attempted to give definition to a legal right to privacy. The right to privacy is puzzling. It must coexist with other countervailing policies like free speech, law enforcement, national security, and public access to government records. Though the right to privacy has never had a fixed definition, privacy law is in a particularly important period of development right now. Courts and policymakers are grappling with the rules that ought to govern the collection and use of personal information in the age of the Internet. Since nearly every private industry and public agency has a stake in the matter, the stakes are high, and the need for privacy experts is great.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
575

LAW693: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW694C: Juv Detention Tchng Pgm

Law students teach in two or three person teams at the Juvenile Detention Center. The program is presented to juveniles from age 13 to 18 held in custody at the Pima County Juvenile Detention Center. Law students attend three sessions for planning and training, followed by each team's consultation with Juvenile Justice personnel. The suggested curriculum is grounded by the eight law-related videos , but law students are free to create their own law-related curriculum for the training sessions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
576

LAW695C: Distinguished Schol Colloquium

Open to students with Distinguished Scholars designation at the College of Law, along with others by application. Course begins with an organizational meeting and scholarly presentation, followed by 25-30 scholarly talks and 5-10 major lectures offered at the Law College throughout the year. Students must attend 10 of these events for each credit to be earned. Students choose which events to attend, and instructor ensures they receive adequate notice of opportunities, exercising discretion as to which events qualify. Professor hosts a second collective meeting at the end of the year in which students share their experiences.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW695D: Regulatory Science

Course is led by the director of the Regulatory Science Consultative Service along with RSCS fellows. For each module in the Foundations seminars, there will be a case-study discussion led by a UA scientist, contributing domain-specific expertise. The colloquia series will draw on campus speakers, as well as scholars, industry leaders and regulators nationwide.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
577

LAW695E: Judicial Clerking Pgm


Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW695Q: Writing Fellows

Instruction in the fundamentals of analysis, writing and research, as well as in the techniques of assisting others to learn the basic skills required of lawyers in analyzing, researching and writing about legal problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
578

LAW695S: Supreme Court Teaching Fellows

This course for law students will be a companion to an undergraduate course taught by the College of Law. Drawing upon thirteen key cases in which the Supreme Court has grappled with fundamental social questions such as segregation (Brown) and abortion (Roe), this course will explore the Court¿s role and rationale in shaping American democracy, culture, and law. The course will consist of guest lecturers each focusing on one case per week, and will emphasize critical thinking and writing skills. In addition to the lecture, law students will attend a workshop each week, with the guest lecturer and Professor Robertson. This session will allow further inquiry into the case of the week, and help the law students prepare for leading their discussion sessions. Law students will also lead weekly discussion sessions for up to 20 undergraduates each. The law students will assist the undergraduates in understanding the cases and the issues raised by the lectures, and will cultivate critical thinking, speaking, writing, and listening skills.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
579

LAW696A: Estate Planning

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW696C: Clinical Practice

Experiential learning is an essential ingredient in the educational process. Our extensive clinical education offerings include in-house clinics and placement clinics. Whether in-house or placement, when enrolled in a clinic, you will be working on real cases, with real clients, under the supervision of a practicing attorney. Enrollment in a clinical course also fulfills the JD graduation requirement of a professional skills course. For many students, working in a clinic brings added meaning to their law school experience. For more information on the individual clinics, please visit law.arizona.edu. Clinics are listed as 696C courses.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
580

LAW696H: Sports Law

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW696K: Refugee Law+Policy

The course will involve an in-depth examination of any of a variety of topics in refugee rights law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
581

LAW696N: Substantial Paper Smnr

A substantial paper is a graduation requirement for the JD program. Students may elect to fulfill this requirement by enrolling in a substantial paper seminar or by electing to do a student-initiated substantial paper, with faculty supervision. All substantial papers must be 3 units, must be graded, and must meet specific requirements including doing an oral presentation. For a full list of requirements and seminar offerings, visit the course schedule at www.law.arizona.edu. All substantial paper course offerings are listed as LAW 696N under their respective sections.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW696P: Rts of Children & Adolescents

Topics include constitutional protections for youth in juvenile delinquency, rights of children to be heard in child welfare proceedings, legal issues regarding children in foster care, unique policies in Indian child welfare, decision-making regarding children's medical care, and international recognition of children's rights.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
582

LAW697D: Intl Human Rts Advoc Workshop

This workshop provides an opportunity for students to be involved in live cases or advocacy efforts with a substantial international human rights dimension. The workshop focuses mostly, although not exclusively, on cases involving indigenous peoples, including cases before United Nations human rights institutions and the inter-American human rights system that is linked to the Organization of American States. Workshop cases may also involve efforts to implement international human rights standards in particular situations through domestic court proceedings or other advocacy efforts at the domestic level.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW697Z: Patent Practice

This course would instruct students in all aspects of patent applications. It would build on the theoretical concepts covered in Patent Law and involve both analysis of sample (existing) patent applications and drafting of new ones. The key elements of patent applications will be emphasized and detailed examination of the requirements of a successful patent application undertaken.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
583

LAW698A: Pre-Bar Professional Skills

The Arizona Supreme Court limits 3L students who are taking the February Bar Exam to enrolling in no more than two (2) semester hours or its equivalent in quarter hours during the month of early bar examination testing and the immediately preceding month. To fulfill these credits, students will have the opportunity to enroll in this two unit February Pre-Bar Professional Skills Study course offered by the Law College. This course is designed to improve student chances for success on the bar, provide a path to the law college's post-Bar experiential learning program, and offer a head start on developing the set of fundamental skills needed for success in professional practice. The emphasis in this newly designed course will focus on writing, analysis and test-taking skills, along with practical skills training in core substantive areas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
584

LAW698B: Adv.Professionalism&LawPractic

This course is intended to be the signature course of Arizona Law's groundbreaking theory-to-practice curriculum. It is designed to give Arizona Law graduates a 'leg up' with some practical skills, knowledge, and insights regarding law practice in a variety of settings, including available resources, tools and best practices for success, and common pitfalls. Incorporating a focus on many of the 'soft skills' that articles and commentators complain that new lawyers lack, the course will emphasize aspects of professionalism, ethics, and skills that are not covered in most classes in the existing curriculum. The course also includes an innovative module on the economics of law practice, which is designed in part to provoke student thought and discussion about (1) how to quickly become as valuable as they can to whatever law enterprise they join, (2) how they might chart their own career development, (3) how to build a successful solo practice, whether they choose to do so immediately after law school or later in their careers, and (4) the different practical and economic considerations driving different types of clients and different types of law offices. The course will culminate in a day spent in Phoenix for a Flinn Foundation program on civic leadership and a meeting with judges. Students will leave this class armed with the tools to be savvier, more effective, and more confident new lawyers, and with a concrete vision of how to craft a productive and rewarding career in the law and as constructive members of their communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
585

LAW698C: Post-February Bar Externship

This course will permit students to enroll in externships during the February Bar Experiential Curriculum (March - May). These externships can be offered for 2-6 credits with a field placement in a corporate law office, government agency, or a public interest organization. The February Bar Experiential Curriculum Working Group will provide students with a list of the law college's possible externships for which students can apply. Students taking courses with a field placement component are expected to devote approximately 50 hours of work/field placement time per credit. For example, students enrolled in a 2 credit externship would devote roughly 100 hours of time, or approximately 12.5 hours per week, to the course for 8 weeks. Students enrolled in a 6 credit externship for example, will devote approximately 37.5 hours per week to the course for 8 weeks.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
586

LAW698D: Basic Trial Advocacy

The basic trial practice course is an introduction to the procedural, evidentiary and ethical requirements as well as persuasive trial techniques involved in civil and criminal trials. Each week students will act as trial counsel executing the various skills employed during the stages of a jury trial-jury selection, opening statements, direct examination, exhibits, cross-examination, impeachment and closing arguments. Student performances will be reviewed and critiqued, and may be periodically videotaped.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
587

LAW698H: Advanced Family Law Practice

This course will teach the student practitioner the basics of handling a family law case from the moment a client walks in the door. We will address fee agreements and ethics of running a law practice, with a focus of special issues in family law. The students will work a case (based on a fact scenario), including the drafting of a petition for dissolution, preparing and filing a motion for temporary orders for support, legal decision-making, and parenting time, conducting a mock temporary orders hearing, calculating child support in AZ, developing a parenting plan and mediating a case (including drafting of a position statement). They will also learn how to effectively deal with difficult clients who have personality disorders or take unreasonable positions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
588

LAW698I: IP Transactions

The Intellectual Property Transactions course will be a two-unit practical course regarding how to draft, negotiate and close intellectual property agreements. The course will cover intellectual property transactional language, including terms for the licensing of copyrights, patents, trademarks and trade secrets, as well as the use of variations of such intellectual property transactional language in drafting various types of agreements, including agreements with customers, development partners, competitors, and vendors. The class will also cover negotiating and closing intellectual property transactions. The primary goals of the class will be (a) to arm students with basic drafting skills for intellectual property terms; (b) to expose students to a variety of types of agreements that include intellectual property terms; and (c) to demonstrate negotiation techniques to close intellectual property transactions, all so that, once in practice, the student will be able to draft and close intellectual property agreements to meet client needs.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
589

LAW698M: Practicalities of Suing Govt

This experiential course is intended to give students hands-on, practical training in litigating against any level of government, state or federal, primarily to overturn abuses of authority. Examples include counties exercising their authority to create special taxing districts; state departments exercising their authority to deny licenses; counties misspending public funds; state commissions abusing their authority to create voting districts; and federal government causing harm to private property while firefighting. (Civil rights litigation, a vast field with more direct constitutional foundations, is not intended to be covered here.) Through role-playing and drafting, students will form 'firms' and litigate against each other by drafting complaints, motions to dismiss, and oral argument. Students will become familiar with statutes and rules unique to suits against the government, including notices of claim, statutes of limitation, attorneys fees and sovereign immunity. Guest lecturers from practice (US Attorney's Office, Administrative Law Judge, mediator) will be invited to some classes and attendance in court is planned for another class.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
590

LAW698N: Intro to Real Estate Finance

This course is an introduction to the underwriting, structuring, documenting and negotiating of certain financial transactions secured by real property assets such as hotels, skyscrapers, condominiums or apartment buildings. Students will examine a fully negotiated deal term sheet and act as either lender's counsel or borrower's counsel to negotiate and build the documents that memorialize such deal terms. The course will expose students to real estate related diligence items such as title insurance, surveys, non-disturbance agreements and tenant estoppels. Students will also learn certain financial underwriting measures and risk mitigants, such as debt-service, loan-to-value ratios, LIBOR and limited recourse. By the end of the course, students should be able to articulate how real property secured financing is structured and identify potential issues in the collateral and financing of such transactions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
591

LAW699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LAW910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation of research, artistic creation, or thesis writing) maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
592

LAW920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library, research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
593
Linguistics
594

LING104B: Beginning Navajo

Study of the sound system and spelling conventions of Navajo, and acquisition of basic oral and literacy skills. Cultural and grammatical information is conveyed by using situations in Navajo life as topics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
595

LING114: Learning a Foreign Language

The goal of the course is to provide students with important tools to help them become successful foreign language learners. Students will become familiar with basic elements of language such as parts of speech and the pronunciation of new sounds as a means of enabling them to anticipate and effectively deal with problems in pronunciation, vocabulary building, and sentence formation that often come up in foreign language study. They will also learn about the intertwining of culture and language, such as how expressions of politeness and body language differ across cultures. They will also be exposed to different language teaching and learning styles, typical mistakes language learners make, and strategies for making language learning more effective. This information will be presented in the context of the wide variety of languages taught at the University of Arizona
Terms offered: Spring 2017
596

LING123: Intro to Math & Language

If you say "Ernie is a male dog" that means that Ernie is male, but if you say "Diane is a racecar driver" that doesn't mean Diane is a racecar. Why? If I say "I was looking for a unicorn", you'll say I was wasting my time, but if I say "I was kissing a unicorn", you'll think I'm truly crazy. Why? "Beavers build dams" is true, but "Dams are built by beavers" isn't. Why? This introductory course will work through concepts like set theory, basic logic, and formal language theory from the ground up to help explore and understand differences like these, which occur in our language (and any other) every day. The notions we will use are very rich and powerful, but are really intuitive and easy to work with. The course is an excellent opportunity to explore powerful tools that have mathematical power and precision (but with virtually no numbers!) to model accessible and intriguing data in the language domain.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
597

LING150A1: Language in the World

All human communities have language - and our language is central to our lives. We use language not only to communicate with each other, we use to in our dreams, in our art, and some have even argued that language is the stuff of thought itself. This course introduces concepts and methods in linguistics - the scientific study of language - along with important concepts and tools from psychology, anthropology, biology, computation, and philosophy. Students learn to understand their own everyday language behavior and that of others as regular, creative, productive and rule-governed. Students develop understanding and appreciation of the complexity, intricacy and beauty of human language by learning about real languages - including spoken and signed languages, thriving and endangered languages, local and remote languages -and consider whether non-human animal communication systems might, or might not, be thought of as 'languages'. Students learn about language in the brain, and the complex interplay of 'nature' and 'nurture' in language acquisition and development, understand the normal and healthy roles that multilingualism play in human development and in society, recognize the rich and diverse linguistic heritage of Arizona, the US and the world, analyze their own innovative language use and linguistic repertoires, and practice applying the tools of the linguist to the languages they see and hear every day, as well as those they've never before experienced.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
598

LING199: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING201: Intro to Linguistics

Fundamentals of linguistics; phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and language acquisition; provides basis for further study in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
599

LING202: Intro to Symbolic Logic

Truth-functional logic and quantification theory; deductive techniques and translation into symbolic notation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING204B: Intermediate Navajo

Continuation of vocabulary development, oral skills enhancement and mastery of Navajo verb paradigms. Native speakers undertake original research and writing in Navajo.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
600

LING210: Amer Indian Languages

This course surveys American Indian languages and the communities that speak them, focusing on a representative sample for closer study. The role of language in maintaining cultural identity is examined, and prospects for the future of American Indian languages are assessed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING211: Meaning In Lang+Society

Introduction to linguistic, psychological, philosophical and social aspects; meaning structures; meaning in the mind/brain; acquisition of word meaning; the differences between literal/figurative meaning; metaphors; meaning in social contexts, models of representation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
601

LING299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING299H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
602

LING300: Introduction To Syntax

Fundamentals of syntactic analysis. Central notions of generative grammar. Aspects of the structure of English and other languages.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING304: Intro Japanese Lang+Ling

Sounds, words, grammar, change, writing, variation, and use of the Japanese language; provides basis for further study in the field.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
603

LING307B: Elem O'Odham Language

Speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension in the Tohono O'odham (Papago) language.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING310: Linguistic Typology

Introduces the student to the commonly shared (or typological) features of morphology, syntax, and phonology of the world's languages. Students will have many problem sets containing data from dozens of languages.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
604

LING314: Phonetics

Students in this course will become familiar with the latest developments in phonetic science. They will become familiar with the International Phonetic Alphabet, and at the end of the course they will be able to write with a high degree of confidence any English word or phrase. They will learn about the prosodic properties of English that play a crucial role in determining the phonetic structure of English. There is also a serious laboratory component of this course and students will carry out sophisticated instrumental experiments that bear on current issues in phonetic theory
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING315: Intro To Phonology

Considers the sound structure of a wide variety of human languages, with the aim of finding principles that describe in an insightful way the properties of their sounds and sound patterns. In addition the course will introduce the student to the higher level organizational principles governing the combinations of sounds into morphemes, words, and phrases.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
605

LING322: Struct+Meaning Of Words

An in-depth introduction to the sounds, structures, meanings and history of English words. At the end of the course, you will know more about the answers to questions like this: Why are English alphabet letters pronounced they way they are? How do we use our mouths to make the sounds of English? What makes certain poems sound rhythmic and metrical? What are the rules that govern the construction of English words from suffixes and prefixes? How do children begin to identify and acquire words from the speech they hear? How did English come to be the language spoken in England? Why is English full of borrowed words? Why is English spelling so inconsistent?
Terms offered: Spring 2017
606

LING330: Languages & Societies:Mid East

A course designed to explore the social and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of Middle Eastern countries.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING341: Language Development

Introduction to theory and research on language development, with emphasis on word learning and grammatical development.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
607

LING364: Intro Formal Semantics

This course provides an introduction to formal linguistic approaches to the study of meaning. Topics include quantifiers, scope, definite descriptions, anaphora, tense and aspect, knowledge of meaning, metalanguages and the syntax-semantics interface.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING388: Language+Computers

Fundamentals of processing of natural language and computational linguistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
608

LING392A: Directed Rsrch In Ling

Introductory individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty into an area of linguistic theory, experimentation, or applications.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
609

LING399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING412: Adv Japanese Linguistics

Advanced readings in Japanese and English on specific topics in Japanese linguistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
610

LING419: Ling Struc Mod Chinese

Linguistic study of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems of modern Chinese, with particular attention to linguistic analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING421: Lang Maint,Preserv+Revit

This course examines potential ways to avert the massive language endangerment and death the world is experiencing. A variety of approaches and methods are considered, including linguistic documentation, teaching language courses, immersion (pre)schools, and the master-apprentice program. The course also covers ethical issues, goals of communities, and the balance between linguists and communities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
611

LING432: Psychology of Language

Introduction to language processing. The psychological processes involved in the comprehension and production of sounds, words, and sentences. Other topics may include language breakdown and acquisition, brain and language, and bilingual processing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING440: The Bilingual Mind

This course surveys bilingualism from a variety of perspectives: linguistic, cognitive, social, and instructional, and addresses such questions as: Do bilingual speakers ¿turn off¿ one language while they speak the other? Does acquiring two languages affect children¿s academic performance? Are the two languages completely separate or mixed together in the bilingual mind (and brain)? What is the best way to learn a second language?
Terms offered: Spring 2017
612

LING449A: Biolinguistics

Biolinguistics is the study of language from the perspectives of neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics and philosophy of mind and evolutionary theory. Topics include language pathology, language genetics, language evolution and language from the perspective of the laws of form.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING453: Thry Span Morphosyntax

An introduction to the current theories of syntax and morphology to describe specific aspects of the structure of Spanish. Central notions of generative grammar.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
613

LING467: Tops French Linguistics

Examines in detail current topics in the linguistic analysis of French. May be repeated when topics vary. Taught in French with readings in French and English.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING492A: Directed Rsrch In Ling

Intermediate and advanced individual or small group research under the guidance of faculty into an area of linguistic theory, experimentation, or applications.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
614

LING493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING495A: Linguistics

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research about Linguistics, Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Short research projects are required of participants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
615

LING496C: Topics in Japanese Ling

This course involves the development and exchange of scholarly information on specific topics in the field of linguistics. Course rotates between various topics and may be taken up to four times. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING496M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
616

LING498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
617

LING499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING499H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
618

LING504: Adv Syntactic Thry

A continuation of LING 503, Foundations of Syntactic Theory I, taught within the Minimalist approach to syntactic theory, with a focus on principles of theory construction and empirical issues in binding, control, movement, structure, and the interfaces with semantics and morphology.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
619

LING507: Statistical Anlys/Ling

Students will learn to use the statistical methods common in linguistics and related fields in order to apply them in the design and analysis of their own research. Methods covered will include ANOVA, ANCOVA, correlation, regression, and non-parametric tests, as well as some specialized analyses such as Multidimensional Scaling Analysis. The course will focus primarily on methods and problems of psycholinguistic, phonetic, and sociolinguistic research. Discussion of the statistical analyses in published articles in these areas will form a substantial part of the course, and application of the methods covered in the course to the students' own research will also be discussed. The course will include instruction in use of statistical software packages.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
620

LING512: Adv Japanese Linguistics

Advanced readings in Japanese and English on specific topics in Japanese linguistics. Graduate-level requirements include a substantial term paper and a class presentation based on that paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING514: Found Phonol Theory II

Investigation of the evidence and arguments for non-linear representations (autosegmental and metrical) and of the organization of the phonological component of grammar, including evidence for its interaction with morphological structures and rules.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
621

LING521: Lang Maint,Preserv+Revit

This course examines potential ways to avert the massive language endangerment and death the world is experiencing. A variety of approaches and methods are considered, including linguistic documentation, teaching language courses, immersion (pre)schools, and the master-apprentice program. The course also covers ethical issues, goals of communities, and the balance between linguists and communities. Graduate-level requirements include 2 additional writing assignments, additional readings, and a longer (25 page) research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING522: Lexical Semantics

Study of word and sentence meaning, relationship between the lexicon and the grammar, idioms, metaphor, etymology, and change of meaning.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
622

LING540: The Bilingual Mind

This course surveys bilingualism from a variety of perspectives: linguistic, cognitive, social, and instructional, and addresses such questions as: Do bilingual speakers ¿turn off¿ one language while they speak the other? Does acquiring two languages affect children¿s academic performance? Are the two languages completely separate or mixed together in the bilingual mind (and brain)? What is the best way to learn a second language? Graduate-level requirements include completing all assignments, writing up a 10-page proposal for an experiment and presenting it (in a 10-15 minute presentation) to the class.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING549A: Biolinguistics

Biolinguistics is the study of language from the perspectives of neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics and philosophy of mind and evolutionary theory. Topics include language pathology, language genetics, language evolution and language from the perspective of the laws of form. Graduate-level requirements include an extra paper and more in depth readings and presentations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
623

LING567: Tops French Linguistics

Examines in detail current topics in the linguistic analysis of French. May be repeated when topics vary. Taught in French with readings in French and English. Graduate-level requirements include higher level of oral and written work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING573: Semiotics And Language

Introduction to semiotics, survey of major figures and trends. Saussure and structuralism, Jakobson and functionalism/poetics, Pierce and pragmaticism. Focus on what these trends tell us about language. Students' written work will represent students' specific interests.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
624

LING581: Adv Computational Ling

This course provides a hands-on project-based approach to particular problems and issues in computational linguistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING583: Sociolinguistics

Contributions of the ethnography of communication, language variation studies, and conversation/discourse analysis to the interdisciplinary development of sociolinguistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
625

LING588: Ling Elicitatn+Document

This course introduces students to the basic techniques for documentation, analysis and description of a language in the field. Topics will include (but are not limited to): ethical issues in language documentation, basic recording and transcription techniques, phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic elicitation, narrative and (if possible) discourse documentation. Students will work with a native speaker consultant of an unfamiliar language, both in a group setting and one-on-one.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING593A: Internship/Hum Lang Tech

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in Human Language Technology in a academic, technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
626

LING595A: Linguistics

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research about Linguistics, Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Short research projects are required of participants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING596C: Topics in Japanese Ling

This course involves the development and exchange of scholarly information on specific topics in the field of linguistics. Course rotates between various topics and may be taken up to four times. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
627

LING596M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling

The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general. Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles. Graduate-level requirements include teaching demonstration involving one hour of teaching with a prepared lesson plan and a follow-up review and critique of your performance.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING597A: Desc Ling Native Am Lang

Workshop includes methods and techniques on how to describe a language in the four basis sub-areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics; terminology and general processes associated with the four sub-areas.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
628

LING599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING689: Professionalism In Ling

This course will focus on how to work as a linguist, primarily as an academic one. Topics include how to write abstracts for submission to conferences, grant proposals at the student level, CVs, and job application letters. We will also discuss the academic job application/interview process, negotiations, the tenure process, and academic vs. other careers for linguists.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
629

LING696F: Tpc Psycholing+Lang Proc

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting with in depth investigation of topics in Psycholinguistics and Language Processing. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING696G: Tpcs Computational Ling

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting with an in depth investigation of computational linguistics theory and application. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
630

LING697A: Linguistic Theory

The practical application of theory and experimentation within a group setting and involving an exchange of ideas and practical methods, skills, and principles as applied to the original linguistic research of the participants. Participants will present their original research and papers and will participate in group feedback on the work. This class is a co-requirement for students writing their linguistics comprehensive exam papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
631

LING900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LING910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
632

LING920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
633
Library & Information Science
634

LIS417: Intro to Digital Cultures

Digital information technologies shape our lives. The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy. Students will have opportunities for active reflection on the ways in which digital technology shapes learning and social interaction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS418: Information Quality

This course will focus on how to insure that we can reliably get quality information and will also consider information quality from the perspective of the suppliers of information. Principles of evaluating information exchanges and sources will be discussed and topics will include the verification of the accuracy of information and the evaluation of resources in specialized subject domains.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
635

LIS472: Government Information

The U.S. government collects, generates, publishes and distributes a vast amount and variety of information. All information professionals-even those who do not intend to specialize as government document librarians-should understand the organization of and promote access to this body of work. In this course, lectures, discussions, and readings will acquaint students with theoretical and practical knowledge. The assignments will provide opportunities for deeper exploration of government information policies and resources.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
636

LIS504: Found Libr+Info Services

As the first course a SIRLS master's student takes, IRLS 504 provides an introduction to the library and information professions, to the SIRLS graduate program, and to roles and current issues in library and information services for the 21st Century.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS506: Rsrch Mth/Libr+Info Prof

Research methodology, research design, and elementary statistics.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
637

LIS515: Organization/Information

Introduction to the theories and practices used in the organization of information. Overview of national and international standards and practices for access to information in collections.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS517: Intro to Digital Cultures

Digital information technologies shape our lives. The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy. Students will have opportunities for active reflection on the ways in which digital technology shapes learning and social interaction. Graduate-level requirements include different percent break-down of requirements and more stringent expectations in work produced.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
638

LIS518: Information Quality

This course will focus on how to insure that we can reliably get quality information and will also consider information quality from the perspective of the suppliers of information. Principles of evaluating information exchanges and sources will be discussed and topics will include the verification of the accuracy of information and the evaluation of resources in specialized subject domains. Graduate-level requirements include a stronger emphasis on the group presentation. Participation, midterm exam, individual project, and short assignments will not contribute as heavily to the final grade.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS520: Ethics Library+Info Prof

Study of the basics of ethical theory and its application to problems in information management. Application and development of ethical codes in cases studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
639

LIS532: Online Searching

Overview of multiple types of digital searching tools used in commercial bibliographic databases, library catalogs, and on the Web for discovering texts, images, and data. Undergraduate students in this co-convened course will have different assignments from the graduate students, but interaction among all levels on the discussion boards will be supported.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS550: Inf Env/Hisp+Ntv Am Pers

Explores the interconnectedness of information forms and environments (libraries, museums, archives, electronic, mass media, etc.) from different theoretical and cultural perspectives. Contrasts each with Native American and Hispanic experiences in information and library settings.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
640

LIS572: Government Information

The U.S. government collects, generates, publishes and distributes a vast amount and variety of information. All information professionals-even those who do not intend to specialize as government document librarians-should understand the organization of and promote access to this body of work. In this course, lectures, discussions, and readings will acquaint students with theoretical and practical knowledge. The assignments will provide opportunities for deeper exploration of government information policies and resources. Graduate-level requirements include a policy paper worth 35% of their final grade.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS589: Scholarly Communication

Structure and workings of scholarly communication and products in the U.S. Examines the content and technology of scholarly communication in various disciplines.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
641

LIS608: Managing the Information Org

The planning/evaluation cycle as an approach to assessing various information center services.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS640: Adv Issues Archival Enterprise

This course considers different approaches to the archival profession. The course will conduct indepth discussions on theory and practice in the areas of appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, preservation, exhibitions, outreach, and electronic resource development. The course may include site visits to archives on or near the UA campus.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
642

LIS671: Intro Digital Collection

This course will address the impact of technology on the fundamentals of libraries, archives, and records management. Many librarians, archivists, and records managers who have been working for even a few years find that they need to know more about working with digital information. The shift from paper to electrons caused a shift in the fundamental nature of the professions. To thrive in the digital era, they need new skills to accomplish many of the same tasks. Collections will no longer be physical, but virtual. Patrons will often be thousands of miles away, not just the other side of the reference desk. This course is intended to help you understand this new environment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
643

LIS674: Preserv Digital Collects

This three-credit course is one of six required for completion of the Certificate in Digital Information Management (DigIn). This course will introduce the basic problems associated with digital preservation. It will give students a thorough orientation to the technological and organizational approaches, which have been developed to address long-term preservation concerns. Finally, the course will examine the current state of the art in digital preservation and assess what challenges remain in research and implementation efforts.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS675: Adv Digital Collections

This three-credit course is one of six required for completion of the Certificate in Digital Information Management (DigIn). This course will provide an in-depth look at the processes involved in building and managing digital collections and institutional repositories. The course will have a strong hands-on component in which students will apply advanced resource description methods to a collection, and then build a prototype repository along with a basic access system. Students will also analyze and discuss case examples of digital collections, focusing on technology management issues and organizational strategies for building different types of collections.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
644

LIS676: Digital Info Mgmt Capstn

This three-credit course is the last of six required for completion of the Certificate in Digital Information Management. IRLS 676 is designed to give students experience working on a major project that will utilize the hands-on as well as theoretical learning acquired through the DigIn courses. Capstone projects should make a significant contribution to an organization that hosts digital collections, such as a library, archives, or museum, or it should make a significant research contribution involving some aspect of digital curation or digital libraries, and should be clearly designed to highlight your abilities and career goals.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS693: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
645

LIS698: Capstone

The purpose of the capstone project is for the student to gain professional community-focused experience while placing the learning, skills and knowledge expected of a librarian or other information professional into a real world professional context. Should the student be approved for a project in lieu of an internship, the same requirement to document expected learning objectives and align the project with SIRLS competencies in the final eportfolio reflection applies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
646

LIS900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

LIS909: e-Portfolio

This is a one-credit required course that is normally taken in the student's final semester before graduating with a master's degree in library and information science.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
647

LIS920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
648
Mexican American Studies
649

MAS150B1: Sex & AIDS in the 21st Century

As we enter the third decade of the HIV/AIDS epidemic there is still no cure. This course examines the history of HIV/AIDS in the United States, its origins, and risk factors for transmission and acquisition. The course will also explore sexuality and drug use and its association with HIV disease. Health promotion programs targeted to various at-risk groups will also be discussed.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
650

MAS150B2: Social Justice

Course focuses on issues of social difference, self-identity, and social status as these are reflected in scholarship about social justice, and applied to social justice issues in the local, national, and international stages. The course has two distinct foci: understanding different leadership styles and preparing to conduct original research to address social and economic inequalities. The focus on leadership will be based on understanding different and contrasting styles of leadership. Students will examine different theories including concepts linked to authoritarian, totalitarian, democratic and social justice styles of leadership. Students will critically analyze examples of leaders with varying styles within the local community, across the nation, and around the world. Social justice leadership will be introduced to determine the degree to which contemporary leaders respond to the needs and interests of the community, whether that community exists at the local, national, and global level. The theoretical framework for social justice leadership derives from Antonio Gramsci's concept of "organic intellectualism," (See The Prison Notebook) which argues that ANY and ALL individuals (regardless of social and economic status) can develop their intellectual/critical capacities to produce change within their own communities. The literature on organic intellectualism will be reviewed and incorporated into students' analysis. Students will develop a plan for undertaking original research that addresses social or economic inequalities in either the local, national, or global context. In doing so, students will develop informed opinions about social and economic inequalities that exist locally and across the world. Students will learn different and competing theoretical and ideological interpretations of inequality as they are depicted in scholarship, popular discourse, and in the media. Social justice research will be introduced as intellectual and analytical means to improve the quality of life of those who are less fortunate. The methodological approach to social justice research is "participatory action research," (See Borda and Rahman's Action and Knowledge: breaking the monopoly with participatory action research) in which individuals work collectively to study and address social and economic problems within their communities. Students will complete proposals for participatory action research projects and present them at a community forum. Although the research proposal will be local, students will learn how these skills and practices can be applied to social justice issues around the world.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
651

MAS150C1: Pop Cult/Media+Latin Id

This course provides a broad-based introduction to the growing interdisciplinary field of popular culture and media studies with an emphasis on the Latina/o experience. Students will explore current theoretical ideas and debates about popular culture and chart its growing importance in all aspects of life. It is a central course for students interested in the social sciences, as well as for students interested in cultural and media studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS160A1: Am Indian Medicine+Well

This course is an overview of historic and contemporary ways that American Indians approach healing, illness and wellbeing. In traditional Native American healing, wellness and illness and result from conditions created by equilibrium/imbalance among individuals, kin, social order and the natural world. We will examine some shared values regarding health and illness (such as illness expressing an imbalance) as well as tribal specific methods of healing and American Indian traditional medicine. American Indian medicine will also be contextualized by social and historical processes that have impacted American Indian wellbeing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
652

MAS199: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS265: Overview: Mex Amer Std

Introduction to Mexican American studies from multidisciplinary perspectives.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
653

MAS291: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS293: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
654

MAS295A: Special Topics in MAS

Special topics in Mexican American Studies.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
655

MAS299H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS307: Chicana Fem:Hst,Thr+Prac

This course will examine the varied and evolving concerns of Chicanas as they forge new visions of feminism through the Chicano Movement of the 1960s; organizing among Chicana lesbian communities; Chicanas' entrance into academic, literary and artistic arenas; diverse community and national activist efforts in the 1980s; and current transnational initiatives.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
656

MAS317: Latin American Immigration

Migration is currently re-shaping American cities, families, urban landscapes, rural areas, and politics, and altering the nation's racial and cultural make up. In response, societal attitudes shift and are re-imagined. This course examines the quasi-permanent presence of undocumented immigrants in the United States in an age of global movements, how this confounds established spatial orders that have conventionally defined nationhood, and the ensuing struggles for belonging and place within 'a nation of immigrants.'
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS319: Mexican American Culture

Historical background, cultural institutions, identity problems, social relations, and expectations of people of Mexican ancestry in the United States.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
657

MAS334A: Mesoamerican Civil:Maya

The course provides an overview of Maya archaeology from the origins of agriculture through the Spanish Conquest.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS337: Survey Mexican Folk Mus

Examination of the traditional folk music of Mexico and its influence. This course covers the history and evolution of the mariachi as well as the vast potpourri of Mexican music traditions. A working knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not required. Open to all undergraduate University students, regardless of major.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
658

MAS341: Trnsl+Intrp:Scl Just+Prc

Professional, social justice, sociolinguistic, and cognitive aspects of Translation and Interpretation. Includes language policy and social justice goals to providing language services for limited and non-English speaking populations, role of translators and interpreters, simultaneous and consecutive interpretation, role of norms in legal translation, meaning of translation, health care interpretation and translation, business and technical translation, observation of professional settings, translation and interpretation practice. This course is a prerequisite for the following courses: MAS 306, MAS 308, MAS 309, MAS 311, MAS 408, MAS 409.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS361: U S Mexico Border Region

Evolution of the borderlands since the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on bi-national interaction and interdependence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
659

MAS365: Latinos+Latinas:Emrg Isu

Using a comparative and multi-disciplinary focus this course critically examines major issues in Latino/a scholarship. Major topics include: immigration, political economy, class, the politics of ethnic identity creation and maintenance, the construction of race, gender, sexuality, and policy issues.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS368: Colonial Mexico

From discovery through the War for Independence.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
660

MAS369: Mexico Snc Independence

Struggle for political, economic and social stability; international relations, cultural patterns.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS381: Medical/Business Trslatn

This course covers English/Spanish medical/business translation. It focuses on (1) building conceptual knowledge in the medical/business contexts and (2) language and translation competence in these settings. It introduces students to professional, nationally-accepted standards of translation practice and performance and uses authentic materials and contextually-meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
661

MAS382: Legal/Business Translatn

This course covers English/Spanish legal/business translation. It focuses on (1) building conceptual knowledge in the legal and business contexts and (2) language and translation competence in these settings. It introduces students to professional, nationally-accepted standards of translation practice and performance and uses authentic materials and contextually-meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
662

MAS399: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS399H: Honors Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
663

MAS435: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
664

MAS467: Race + Ethnic Relations

Social processes involved in minority groups in terms of race, caste, class, ethnicity, politics, and religion.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
665

MAS470: The Feminization of Migration

This a co-convened course that will include advanced 4th-year undergraduate students who along with graduate students (enrolled in MAS 570) will examine migration as a worldwide phenomenon in part due to the greater participation of women. In the Americas, in particular, there has been a steady increase in migration to the U.S. from Mexico and Latin America since the 1960s, much of which can be traced to the negative impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) resulting in the impoverishment of agricultural sectors and lack of employment opportunities, a combination known to produce the feminization of migration. In this class, we will explore this phenomenon and the various challenges borne by women and youths. We will consider relevant theories, such as neoliberal economics and structural violence, as well as a wide range of perspectives, combining demography, history, ethnography and public policy analysis to better understand issues of borders, transnational identities, human rights, labor rights, and responsibilities of host and sending states.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
666

MAS471: Beg Simultaneous Interpr

This course begins the in-depth study of simultaneous interpretation (continued in Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation). Its focus is (1) building conceptual knowledge in legal/medical/business contexts and (2) language and interpreting competence. Students are introduced to professional, nationally accepted standards of practice and performance using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS472: Beg Consecutve Interpret

This course begins the in-depth study of the theory and practice of consecutive interpretation and sight translation (continued in Advanced Consecutive Interpretation). It reviews legal and medical concepts and covers policy and law relevant to interpreter practice, theory, skill development, and special issues in legal, medical, and business settings using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
667

MAS473: Span Clsrm Tchr of Span

Practical Spanish for the elementary and secondary school subject-matter teacher who uses Spanish as the medium of instruction.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS481: Adv Simultaneous Interpr

This course continues the in-depth study (begun in Beginning Simultaneous Interpretation) of simultaneous interpretation. Its focus is (1) building conceptual knowledge in legal/medical/business contexts and (2) advanced language & interpreting proficiency. Students will review of professional, nationally accepted standards of practice and performance using authentic materials & contextually meaningful situations. Focus is on intensive skill development.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
668

MAS482: Adv Consecutve Interpret

This course continues the in-depth study (begun in "Translation and Interpretation: Social Justice and Practice") of the theory and practice of consecutive interpretation and sight translation. It focuses on a review of complex legal and medical concepts; policy and law relevant to interpreter practice; theory; skill development; and special issues in interpretation in legal, medical, and business settings using authentic materials and contextually meaningful situations. Focus is on intensive skill development.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS491: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
669

MAS493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS498: Senior Capstone

A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
670

MAS499: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
671

MAS535: Mex Traditional Medicine

This interdisciplinary course is a survey of various popular and Indigenous medicinal systems that fall under the rubric known as Mexican Traditional Medicine (MTM). Mexican scholar Carlos Viesca Treviño defines MTM as medicinal knowledge(s) that emanate from Mesoamerican world views and that have adapted to historical and social conditions in the Americas. This course will explore various expressions of MTM, with a special emphasis on Indigenous medicinal approaches to healing that exemplify both continuities and adaptations. We will compare across cultures some shared values in various Indigenous systems as well as how they are uniquely expressed in contemporary settings. We will also draw from the local knowledge holders of Indigenous populations from this region to compare various approaches in traditional medicine. This course will introduce students to the relationship between place, healing and cosmology in Indigenous-based cultures that maintain curing traditions and practices. We will explore the theories and philosophies that are used in MTM as well as applied knowledge and practices that are useful for self care and community wellness. Graduate-level requirements include projects with deeper analysis, additional three sessions to discuss their research projects, and research paper weighted twice as heavy as the undergraduate paper, with greater expectations in research, writing and analysis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
672

MAS570: Feminization of Migrate

Worldwide human migration and displacements are at an all time high because of political, economic, and environmental upheavals. In the Americas, in particular, there has been a steady increase in migration to the U.S. from Mexico and Latin America since the 1960s. The most significant change has been the greater participation of women due in part to the negative impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) resulting in the impoverishment of agricultural sectors and lack of employment opportunities, a combination known to produce the feminization of migration. In this class, we will explore this phenomenon and the various challenges borne by women and youths. We will consider relevant theories, such as structural violence, as well as a wide range of perspectives, combining demography, history, ethnography and public policy analysis to better understand issues of borders, transnational identities, human rights, labor rights, and responsibilities of host and sending states.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
673

MAS591: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
674

MAS595A: Special Topics

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
675

MAS699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
676

MAS910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MAS920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
677
Middle Eastern & North African Study
678

MENA103B: Elementary Modern Hebrew

Intensive introduction to establish foundation for beginning fluency in conversation, reading and writing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
679

MENA150C1: Islam Civ:Trad+Mod Mid E

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of the religion of Islam and its historical development from the seventh century to the present day. We will focus on Islam as a culture by asking how it spread and changed, how it produced traditions and institutions, and how it has both shaped and adapted to the realities of the modern world. The course will ask students to consider the religion and civilizations of the Islamic world as dynamic processes by looking for patterns of structure formation, institutionalization, change and decline in the political, economic, military and cultural realms. While the main focus will be on the Middle East heartland of classical Islam, the spread of Islam to Africa, South and Southeast Asia and the west will also be examined. Students will be expected to illustrate mastery of basic geographical, historical and doctrinal information, as well as to show increasing ability to critically evaluate certain central questions with regard to a variety of historical and geographical contexts and to mobilize evidence in defense of their views.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
680

MENA160A1: The Religion of Islam

This course provides an overview of the Qur'an, life and teachings of Muhammad, and the differences between Sunni and Shi'i Islam. Students also receive an introduction to Islamic intellectual traditions and cultures.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA160A2: Middle Eastern Humanities

Introduces students to the values, traditions, and development of Middle Eastern (Islamic) culture and civilization. This course is designed to familiarize students with the principal achievements in art, architecture and literature of Islamic civilization, to help students understand these achievements in their social and cultural contexts, and to consider the historical evolution of our knowledge and understanding of these achievements.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
681

MENA203B: Inter Modern Hebrew

Instruction to achieve moderate fluency in conversation, reading and writing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA251: Wrld Reg:Comp+Glob Persp

Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
682

MENA277A: History of Middle East

Middle East history from the rise of Islam to the Turkish conquest of Constantinople, 600-1453.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA277B: History of Middle East

Modern Middle East: the Ottoman Empire, Iran, and the Arab lands, 1453-present.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
683

MENA303B: Advanced Modern Hebrew

Advanced instruction in modern Hebrew language and literature.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA311E: Geography of Middle East

Physical environments and cultural areas of Southwest Asia, with emphasis on people-environment interrelationships, settlement systems, and impact of Islam.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
684

MENA330: Languages & Societies:Mid East

A course designed to explore the social and linguistic aspects of the languages and cultures of Middle Eastern countries.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA334: Islamic Thought

A consideration of Islam, one of the world's major religions, and the view of the universe and the modes of behavior and values it advocates. Most of the course will be dedicated to an examination of the majority (Sunni) opinion, but some attention will be directed also to the more significant minority (Shi'i, et al.) positions as well. The course has no prerequisite but does build on the information presented in TRAD 101 Middle Eastern Humanities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
685

MENA340: Persian World

This course provides students with a critical understanding of the histories and cultures of the Persian-speaking world, which includes the communities in Persian, Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, China, Pakistan, India, Turkey, Iraq, United States, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Canada, and European countries. This course introduces students to the Persian civilization from a variety of approaches. This course will help students to engage with major historical and cultural developments in Persian history and civilization. In light of the disciplinary methodologies related to those fields, students will study the texts and material culture of Iran in order to understand historical, literary, and political developments within their social contexts. Eventually, students will gain an understanding of how Persia developed into a world power, how it was divided, and how it continued to exist as a cultural concept. Students will read texts in English, watch films, and experience music, dance, and food. Through a comparative and critical approach, the course will also examine the value and limitations of theoretical perspectives offered by related disciplines such as literary, political science, religion, and cultural studies. Teaching will include lectures, discussions, and learner-centered activities using cooperative learning techniques. There will be live and interactive performances in some of the sessions on food and dance. Readings will be accompanied by short video and/or audio clips. All learning materials including articles, chapters, films, audios, etc. will be uploaded on the course's website and D2L.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
686

MENA365: Muslim Views of the West

This course investigates how consciousness of "the West" as a rival cultural entity emerged in Muslim societies, and how the West has been represented and evaluated by Muslim intellectuals from the colonial period to current debates over US hegemony and globalization.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA372A: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Biblical period through the Babylonian Exile; introduction to the Hebrew Bible.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
687

MENA372B: Hist+Reli:Israel Anc Tim

Survey of the history and religion of ancient Israel. Ezra-Nehemiah to the Roman Empire, with emphasis on the formation of rabbinic Judaism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA375: Ethnography Middle East

Introduction to and critical examination of the ethnographic literature on the peoples/cultures of the Middle East. Focus on social organization, cultural meanings, and regional political economy.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
688

MENA377: Modern Israel

Evolution of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the present. Survey of the origins of the State of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th Century Europe to the Declaration of the State of Israel in 1948. Evolution of the State of Israel from 1949 to the present. Emphasis on interactive generative processes and understanding of the interplay between past processes and present socio-political realities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA381B: Hist Of Muslim Societies

Evolution and global spread of Muslim societies, modernization and its problems.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
689

MENA385: Intro to Political Islam

Political Islam has become one of the most ubiquitous forces across the Muslim world in the last four decades. While most of these movements share a common commitment to promoting Islamic morality and resisting external forces, there is enormous diversity and change within what is generalised as "Islamism". Student will learn to grasp the basic differences as well as overlaps in identity and approach between the major streams of contemporary political Islam with regard to popularity and location, preference for armed vs. political strategies, nationalism vs. Pan-Islamist orientation, sectarian attitudes, levels of pragmatism, etc. Students are expected to be familiar with basic history, geography and religious terminology of the Muslim world prior to taking this course.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
690

MENA389: Mid East Ethnic+Rel Minr

Overview of ethnic and religious minorities in the contemporary Middle East, study of ethnic and religious diversity and its origin and manifestations in the modern Middle East. Examination of how the concept of religious and ethnic minority has emerged as a key factor in state policies towards minorities as well as the cultural, economic, political, religious, and educational lives of its people.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA393: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
691

MENA409B: Biblical Hebrew

Study of Biblical Hebrew grammar and literature: Poetry.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA435: Kabbalah & Jewish Mysticism

Surveys the ideology, symbolism, and major themes of Jewish mysticism as evidenced in several prominent mystical texts. The core of this course will be reading the texts in English translation and the development of skills in reading and understanding a Jewish mystical text.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
692

MENA456: Jews:Islam Wrld 1840-Pre

The course objectives are (1) to introduce students to the world of the Jewish communities in Islamic countries and (2) to acquaint students with the culture and history of Jewish communities of the Islamic world and the characteristics of Middle Eastern and North African Judaism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA473: Hist India+Pak:1750-Pres

Survey of political, social and economic developments in South Asia from the mid-18th century to the present. Writing emphasis for India-Pakistan specialization.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
693

MENA479: Ottoman Empire To 1800

History of Ottoman Empire from its origins through the direct Western European impact, focusing on the political and social history of the empire in Europe and Asia.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA484: Hist Arab/Israeli Confl

Origins of Zionism, and Palestinian and other Arab nationalisms from the nineteenth century and the post-1948 Arab-Israel state conflict in the Cold War era.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
694

MENA490: Women Mid East Societ

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA493: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
695

MENA494: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA495E: Strggl+Surv Mod Me+N Afr

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
696

MENA496B: Spcl Tops Mid East/N. Afri Std

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
697

MENA498: Senior Capstone

This course is a culminating experience and requirement for MENAS majors. In a weekly seminar students work with mutual support and the guidance of the instructor on the revision of a paper written for a past MENAS course. Students are expected to expand their papers into an 18-20 page research paper that draws on primary sources. Students should choose a paper for this purpose that is strongly connected to their concentration within the major. Students who are concentrating in Language and Culture are expected to utilize some original language source material for their revised papers. The resulting papers will be submitted for evaluation to the instructor and presented to an audience of students and faculty. Students are also required to submit a 400-500 word reflective essay on their course of study and intellectual development in the MENAS major. Enrollment in this course requires senior standing.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
698

MENA498H: Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA535: Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism

Surveys the ideology, symbolism, and major themes of Jewish mysticism as evidenced in several prominent mystical texts. The core of this course will be reading the texts in English translation and the development of skills in reading and understanding a Jewish mystical text. Graduate-level requirements include a substantial research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
699

MENA573: Hist India+Pak:1750-Pres

Survey of political, social and economic developments in South Asia from the mid-18th century to the present. Writing emphasis for India-Pakistan specialization. Graduate-level requirements include additional research or writing; see instructor for details.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA579: Ottoman Empire To 1800

History of Ottoman Empire from its origins through the direct Western European impact, focusing on the political and social history of the empire in Europe and Asia. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
700

MENA584: Hist Arab/Israeli Confl

Origins of Zionism, and Palestinian and other Arab nationalisms from the nineteenth century and the post-1948 Arab-Israel state conflict in the Cold War era. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and an extensive research paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA590: Women Mid East Society

Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women. Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities. Graduate-level requirements include an additional paper.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
701

MENA593: Internship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA594: Practicum

The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
702

MENA595E: Strggl+Surv Mod Me+N Afr

The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons. Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA596B: Spcl Tops Mid East/N. Afri Std

The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
703

MENA599: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA699: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
704

MENA799: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA900: Research

Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
705

MENA908: Case Studies

Individual study of a particular case, or report thereof.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA909: Master's Report

Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
706

MENA910: Thesis

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

MENA920: Dissertation

Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Terms offered: Spring 2017
707
Public Management & Policy
708

PA205: Ethics+Econ/Wealth Creat

We will study the ethics and the economics of such phenomena as market competition, institutions of private and public property, trade restrictions, globalization, and corporate welfare. How do people create wealth? How do societies enable people to create wealth? Are some ways more ethical than others? Why do some societies grow rich while neighboring societies remain poor? People have various ways of creating wealth. Which are ethical and which are not? Why? (PHIL 205 is not an introduction to the principles of Economics and is not a substitute for ECON 200, ECON 201A or ECON201B.)
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA206: Public Policy + Admin

Theory and practice of executive agencies, including policy making and other functions, processes, personnel and fiscal management, and administrative law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
709

PA241: Criminal Justice Admin

Theory and practice of criminal justice organizations: police, courts and correctional institutions.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA291: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline. Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
710

PA299: Independent Study

Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA321: Medical Ethics

Ethical issues that arise in relation to medicine and health care: abortion, euthanasia, the allocation of scarce medical resources, socialized medicine, doctor-patient confidentiality, paternalism, etc.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
711

PA323: Environmental Ethics

Do we have an obligation to recycle? What can and what should we do about the quality of our air and water? In general, what are the proper environmental responsibilities of government, business, community organizations, and individual citizens?
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA324: Law and Morality

Exploration of classic and contemporary philosophical issues about law and morality. Topics covered will vary but may include, among others, the limits of social interference with individual liberty, legal paternalism and physician-assisted suicide, legal moralism, freedom of speech and expression, legal punishment and capital punishment, and civil disobedience.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
712

PA330: Ethics for Public Admin

This course is required for public administration students and is four parts. The first section is devoted to the context of ethics in the public and non-profit sectors. Specifically, the students will read, discuss and contrast applied ethical postures, e.g., consequentialist and deontological. Most of the course will be devoted to the learners resolving ethical dilemmas in criminal justice organizations, health and human services organizations and government generally. The final section will examine larger issues in the civic culture.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA331: Criminal Justice Ethics

This is a course in applied ethics and not a course in philosophy or religion. Using short lectures and interactive discussions the course allows Criminal Justice students to view the systems and issues within in it from the basic philosophical positions of teleology, deontology and virtues ethics. Using those frameworks, it allows the students to view ethical issues from the basic ethical standing points.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
713

PA338: Guns in America

This course examines guns from historical, criminological, political, legal, sociological and cultural perspectives. Grounded in the American context, the course focuses on the relationship between gun rights and gun rules; between crime and self-defense; and between the past and present politics of guns.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA340: Police Management

This course examines the principles of administration, management, politics and leadership with emphasis on their applicability to police planning, organization, direction, control, and personnel management.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
714

PA341: Juvenile Delinquency

Nature, causes, and consequences of delinquent behavior.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA342: Criminology

Study of the social origins of criminal law, criminal behavior, and reactions to crime.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
715

PA344: Law and Public Policy

Analysis of selected principles of criminal law, criminal procedure and correctional law.
Terms offered: Spring 2017

PA347: Nature of Murder

This course will explore the definition, history and types of homicide.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
716

PA350: Police Accountability

While modern police departments have always been at odds with the citizens they serve, the events of recent years have thrust this dichotomy into the public spotlight. The conflict is contentious and a resolution is not entirely clear. This course examines the police and their role and authority, the most common ways that police abuse that authority, the consequences of police abuses, and efforts to curtail police abuse of authority.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
717

PA351: Police Comm Rel

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of community policing. The history of policing is examined in such a way as to explain why this concept became so important in American policing in the 1960's and how that idea has evolved into the 21st century. Proactive policing and problem solving are emphasized along with overcoming resistance to community policing within police bureaucracies. Students will gain an understanding of the benefits and challenges of creating partnerships with the community and how to implement policing strategies with regard to creating safe neighborhoods, improving the quality of life for communities, reducing specific and/or violent crime and preventing potential acts of terrorism.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
718

PA352: Gang Theory

This course will explore the definition, history and types of American based gangs and some globalized gangs. The course will seek to connect lecture and text with real world events. Classroom activities and discussion will be emphasized with the objective of assisting the student in understanding and evaluating his/her own beliefs and values concerning the topic of gangs. This course will include the study of gangs, guest speakers involved in this field of work, simulation and discussion. Gang prevention, intervention and interdiction strategies will be covered and assessed as community strategies to gang problems. As a result, students should have a better overall understanding of the gang issues that confront American society from the individual to the societal level.
Terms offered: Spring 2017
719

PA391: Preceptorship

Specialized work on an individual basi